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Emory College 2018 - 2019 Catalog

About the College

faculty and student at blackboardEmory College of Arts and Sciences combines the personal engagement and excellent teaching of a traditional liberal arts college with the ground-breaking scholarship and resources of a major research university.

Our diverse, ethically engaged, and inquiry-driven community seeks to transform the world through leadership in research, teaching, and service. Our mission is supported by an internationally recognized faculty, dynamic staff, and superb facilities that adopt the latest innovations in technology and environmental sustainability.

Nearly 40% of College students have some international experience by graduation, placing Emory among the top U.S. research universities for study abroad. Emory College faculty have published more than 750 books and have been distinguished recipients of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Humanities Medal, and the National Book Award. Through participation in interdisciplinary research centers across campus, College faculty bridge traditional barriers between the disciplines and work together to advance the frontiers of knowledge.

College Profile

candler roofEmory College of Arts and Sciences combines the personal concern of a small, liberal arts college with the rich diversity of a major, urban university.

The oldest and largest division of Emory University, Emory College of Arts and Sciences has provided instruction in the arts and sciences to talented, highly motivated students for more than 165 years. Today its faculty of some four hundred offers more than twelve hundred courses to nearly five thousand students drawn from every section of the United States and many foreign countries.

The College offers students off-campus opportunities to participate in a wide range of internship programs or to study abroad, including the Bobby Jones Scholars Program with St. Andrews University in Scotland.

Emory College of Art and Sciences resources are enriched by those of Emory University, a research university comprising

Most members of the college faculty also teach in graduate or professional programs. Emory University is a community of scholars where undergraduates, graduate and professional students, faculty, and staff benefit from the presence of each other as well as from the presence on or near campus of the

Emory is expanding its international programs and opportunities to rise to the challenge of globalization. This effort underscores the University’s conviction that a liberal arts education in the twenty-first century must embrace global perspectives and enhance cross-cultural understanding. Emory is committed to training its students to pursue their professions and live their lives in a world that is fast becoming a global neighborhood. Emory College requires courses on foreign language and international and comparative issues; the other schools have strong international and global components in their curricula. A growing number of international scholars are teaching and conducting research at Emory; professors from Emory are pursuing scholarly research and service abroad, and their students gain from their experiences, insights, and broadened perspectives. The enrollment of international students is rising. Emory faculty and students are participating in The Carter Center action programs in developing countries. Mutually beneficial linkage agreements with foreign universities present challenging opportunities. Substantial new funding is stimulating exciting initiatives in global education.

Emory College offers a variety of study abroad opportunities through exchange agreements, Emory study abroad programs, and programs run by other institutions. While earning direct Emory credit in most academic disciplines, students can study in most parts of the world, including: Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Chile, China, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Egypt, France, Germany, Greece, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Korea, Namibia, Portugal, Russia, South Africa, South Pacific, Spain, Turkey and the United Kingdom. The Center for International Programs Abroad advises students about studying abroad and works with college faculty to develop and administer academic year, semester, and summer study abroad programs designed specifically for Emory undergraduates.

Among the centers for specialized research and study at Emory are the Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts; The Carter Center of Emory University; the Emory Center for International Studies; the Center for Ethics in Public Policy and the Professions; the Center for Research in Faith and Moral Development; and the Michael C. Carlos Museum. Independent affiliates include the National Faculty of Humanities, Arts, and Sciences and the Georgia Humanities Council.

commencementTo qualify for baccalaureate degrees, students of Emory College must fulfill distribution requirements that ensure both basic competency in essential skills and a general knowledge of each of the major areas of human inquiry, and they must fulfill major requirements that ensure a command of the area of inquiry of most interest to them. Since these requirements permit flexibility and also reserve a substantial portion of each course of study for free electives, students work with faculty and student advisers to fashion programs that fit their individual interests. In this way Emory not only prepares students to face demanding tasks and complex problems but also introduces them to the full range of human achievement and aspiration in the hope of deepening their most searching questions and intensifying their resolve to attain their life goals.

To encourage full participation in its programs, Emory College encourages students to partake of an active residential life on campus. The college’s commitment to campus residence reflects its conviction that largeness of mind and spirit may be learned in dormitories and concert halls, on stages and playing fields, as well as in classrooms, laboratories, and libraries. Students are, therefore, encouraged to participate in cocurricular activities that range from lectures, colloquia, and symposia, to concerts, exhibits, and plays, to intercollegiate and intramural sports, to scores of social clubs, civic organizations, and religious groups.

Although the college faculty is deeply committed both to discovering knowledge through scholarship and research and to communicating it through teaching, it also values informal interaction with students through advising programs and cocurricular activities. Students who become members of the Emory community should expect, therefore, to meet challenges in a variety of contexts and to learn from other students as well as from the faculty and staff.

Members of the college also join members of other divisions of the University in bringing distinguished guests for comprehensive symposia or consultations on themes of common interest. The Carter Center of Emory University regularly sponsors major consultations. Topics have focused on the Near East, national health policy, arms control and international security, reinforcing democracy in the Americas, global health, the Middle East, and women in the Constitution.

Surrounded by a hilly residential section of Atlanta called Druid Hills, the Emory campus combines natural beauty with historic interest. Peavine Creek, a branch of Peachtree Creek, winds through the campus. Flowering shrubs—azaleas, dogwoods, and redbuds—abound; and towering trees—magnolias, maples, oaks, and pines—provide shade. Several buildings on the main quadrangle are listed in the National Register of Historic Places, and several markers on the campus commemorate historic events.

Atlanta night shotA few miles south and west of the campus, the center of Atlanta bustles with activities stimulated by government, business, and transportation as well as research, education, and culture. A contemporary city of energy and charm, Atlanta has increasingly gained national and international prominence. This was highlighted by its selection as the host of the 1996 Olympic Games. It is the home of some twenty colleges and universities, including Agnes Scott College, the Atlanta College of Art, Clark Atlanta University, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia State University, Morris Brown College, Morehouse College, Oglethorpe University, and Spelman College. Several professional sports teams are based in the city. Opera and theater have been strong since the opening of DeGive’s Opera House in 1893. Today Atlanta’s Woodruff Arts Center includes the High Museum of Art and the Alliance Theatre as well as the Atlanta Symphony and Chorus.

Located more than one thousand feet above sea level, Atlanta offers four distinct seasons. A few hours north of the city, students hike on the Appalachian Trail, canoe and raft on the Chattooga, Chestatee, and Hiawassee rivers, or ski on Sugar Mountain. East and south, they swim and sun on the coasts of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Through organizations such as Volunteer Emory, the college encourages students to explore the city of Atlanta and the region surrounding it and to contribute to the lives of other people—its hope being that the education and the lives of all of its students will be enriched both by their human and civic concerns and by their work and play.

Emory University is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award associate, baccalaureate, master's, doctorate and professional degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404.679.4500 for questions about the accreditation of Emory.

Mission Statements

University Mission Statement

Emory University's mission is to create, preserve, teach, and apply knowledge in the service of humanity.

students in lectureTo fulfill this mission, the University supports the full range of scholarship, from undergraduate to advanced graduate and professional instruction, and from basic research to its application in public service. While being a comprehensive research university, Emory limits its academic scope to those fields in which, by virtue of its history and location, it can excel. Hence its academic programs focus on the arts and sciences, business, law, theology, and the health professions. These disciplines are unified by their devotion to liberal learning; by cooperative interdisciplinary programs; and by the common pursuit of intellectual distinction.

The Emory community is open to all who meet its high standards of intelligence, competence, and integrity. It welcomes a diversity of ethnic, cultural, socioeconomic, religious, national, and international backgrounds, believing that the intellectual and social energy that results from such diversity is a primary asset of the University.

In keeping with the demand that teaching, learning, research, and service be measured by high standards of integrity and excellence, and believing that each person and every level of scholarly activity should be valued on its own merits, the University aims to imbue scholarship at Emory with

The University, founded by the Methodist Episcopal Church, cherishes its historical affiliation with the United Methodist Church. While Emory's programs are today entirely nonsectarian (except for those at the Candler School of Theology), the University has derived from this heritage the conviction that education can be a strong moral force in both society and the lives of its individual members.

College Mission Statement

The scholarly mission of Emory College involves research and creativity, teaching, and service.

As an institution dedicated to intellectual discovery and creativity, Emory College is charged both with generating new knowledge and with inventing new ways of understanding what is already known. Faculty, administrators, and students cooperate to expand the boundaries of the known through

As a teaching institution, Emory College imparts to its students the kinds of knowledge that traditionally compose a broad liberal education:

Through instruction that aims to be the symbiotic complement of research, Emory College prepares its graduates to live an active life of the mind, aware of their responsibilities to assume a part in the intellectual leadership of the nation.

As an institution responsive to the various communities of which it is a member, Emory College acknowledges a commitment to service in its local community, in the national and international academic community, and in the nation as whole.

Each aspect of this threefold mission must be carried forward in an atmosphere of intellectual and moral integrity, one of habitual regard for the ethical dimensions of research and creativity, teaching, and service.

College Statement on Diversity

Emory College of Arts and Sciences is committed to valuing difference and ensuring that the students, faculty, staff, and administrators are diverse in ethnicity, gender, religion, philosophy, sexual orientation, and physical ability. At the same time, we are unified in the goal of achieving academic excellence, preparing for life and work in a global society. We strive to offer multicultural and gender-balanced education in the curriculum, instruction, and services that address learning and physical disabilities and support for staff and faculty development.

University Environmental Mission Statement Precis

We, the Emory University community, affirm our commitment to protect and enhance the environment through our teaching, research, service, and administrative operations. We seek to foster a community that sustains ecological systems and educates for environmental awareness, local action, and global thinking. We seek to make environmentally sound practices a core value of the University.

College History

Gary S. Hauk 91PhD
Vice President and Deputy to the President

Cor Prudentis Possidebit Scientiam: "The wise heart seeks knowledge."
-Emory University motto, Proverbs 18:15

class photoIn 1836, when the Cherokee nation still clung to its ancestral lands in Georgia, and Atlanta itself had yet to be born, a small band of Methodists dedicated themselves to founding a new town and college. They called the town Oxford, linking their little frontier enterprise with the university attended by the founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley. The college they named Emory, after an American Methodist bishop who had inspired them by his broad vision for education that would enhance the character as well as the mind of men and women.

From its beginning, Emory has sought to preserve and carry forward the ideals of the nineteenth-century public spirit out of which Emory and other colleges had their beginnings. These ideals owed much to the peculiarly American blend of hope for a perfect future, democratic conviction about the importance of individuals, and progressive reform of educational curricula. That philosophy has shaped a university that aims to nurture moral imagination as well as critical intellect and aesthetic judgment.

On December 10, 1836, the Georgia legislature granted a charter to Emory College, named for the young Methodist bishop John Emory, from Maryland, who had died in a carriage accident the previous year. Not until two years after the chartering would the College open its doors, and on September 17, 1838, the College's first president, Ignatius Alphonso Few, and three other faculty members welcomed fifteen freshmen and sophomores. They hailed from as far away as Charleston, South Carolina, and they included a future Emory president, Osborn L. Smith, and a future member of the faculty, George W. W. Stone.

In retrospect, the mission of the nineteenth-century college appears to have been to rein in the spirit as much as to expand the mind. Certainly that was true at Emory. Students had to be in their rooms during study hours and could not go beyond the town limits more than a mile without the president's consent. Signing their names into the Matriculation Book, the earliest students bound themselves to obey the "Laws and Statutes of the College." Despite the watchful attention of their "guards," students often found ways to work up enough mischief for the faculty to put them on probation, even to expel them. Covington, an apparent seedbed of temptation, provided the allure of taverns and traveling shows.

Other social outlets proved more harmonious with the academic tenor of the campus. Two principal venues for student gatherings were Phi Gamma Hall and Few Hall, named for the two literary societies that brought students together for sharing meals, preparing their lessons, and talking about matters of the intellect. A keen competitiveness developed between the two societies, leading to a tradition of debate that permeated the campus, and laying the groundwork for Emory's national preeminence in debate-a tradition carried forward since 1955 in the Barkley Forum.

Athletics, too, has had an important place at Emory for well over a hundred years-although Emory has never played intercollegiate football and still proudly proclaims, under the emblem of a football on T-shirts, "Undefeated Since 1836." For many years, going back to the presidency of Warren Candler in the 1890s, Emory prohibited intercollegiate sports. His principal objection was the cost of intercollegiate athletics programs, the temptation to gambling, and the distraction from scholarship. Candler was not unalterably opposed to athletics, however. During his presidency he oversaw the creation of the nation's first model intramural program. In spirit the program made it possible for every student to participate in athletics, and this possibility became at Emory a guiding principle-"Athletics for All."

pushball 1950sIn time, the Board of Trustees modified its position on intercollegiate sports by reaffirming the ban on major sports-football, basketball, and baseball-but allowing the possibility of competition in others. Soon Emory was competing in soccer, swimming, tennis, track and field, and wrestling, and in 1985 Emory helped to found the University Athletic Association, a league of Division III members that stresses academics first. Emory's intercollegiate programs regularly rank among the top ten NCAA Division III programs in the country and graduate more academic all-Americans than any other university in Division I, II, or III.

For the first half-century of its life Emory struggled for existence, clinging to a tenuous financial lifeline. When war broke out between North and South in 1861, every student left to fight, and the College's trustees closed the College for the duration. When Emory reopened in January 1866, three faculty members (including President James Thomas) returned to a campus whose buildings had been used for military hospitals and whose libraries and equipment had been destroyed.

By the turn of the twentieth century, Emory's curriculum had evolved from a traditional liberal arts program dependent on rote memorization and drill, to become broad enough for students to earn degrees in science, to study law or theology, and even to pursue learning and expertise in technology and tool craft. President Isaac Stiles Hopkins, a polymath professor of everything from English to Latin and Math, had launched a department of technology that struck the fancy of state legislators, and soon enough they were luring him away from Emory to become the first president of what is now the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Still, the sleepy little town of Oxford offered little advantage to a college whose trustees might have their visions set on higher aspirations. By happenstance, the road from Oxford to Atlanta was paved by Vanderbilt University. In 1914, following a protracted struggle between the Vanderbilt University Board of Trust and the bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, over control of the university, the church severed its long relationship with Vanderbilt and made plans to create a new university in the Southeast. Asa Candler, the founder of The Coca-Cola Company and brother to former Emory President Warren Candler, helped the church decide that the new university should be built in Atlanta. Writing to the Educational Commission of the church on June 17, 1914, Candler offered $1 million and a subsequent gift of seventy-five acres of land.

Emory College trustees agreed to move the college to Atlanta as the liberal arts core of the university. Those seventy-five acres, about six miles northeast of downtown Atlanta, lay in pasture and woods amid Druid Hills, a parklike residential area laid out by landscape architect Frederick Law Olmstead, the designer of New York City's Central Park. Within a year marble buildings were under construction out in the Druid Hills, and within four years-by September 1919-Emory College had joined the schools of theology, law, medicine, business, and graduate studies at the University's muddy new campus.

The course of Emory's history changed dramatically and forever when, in November 1979, Robert Woodruff, an Emory alumnus and former Coca-Cola chairman, and his brother, George, transferred to Emory $105 million in Coca-Cola stock (worth nearly one billion dollars in 2005). At the time the largest single gift to any institution of higher education in American history, the Woodruff gift made a profound impact on Emory's direction over the next two decades, boosting the University into the top ranks of American research universities. In the quarter-century since, Emory has built on its considerable strengths in the arts and humanities, the health sciences, and the professions, through strategic use of resources.

The small community of scholarship founded in Oxford has grown, but Emory's growth in research has in no way diminished the insistence on great teaching by the faculty. The 1997 report of the University Commission on Teaching reaffirmed Emory's historical emphasis on the high quality of teaching at all faculty levels and in all schools and recommended various means of support to ensure the perpetuation of this great tradition.

Since September 2003 the University has undertaken to refine its vision for its future and to develop a strategic plan for how to get there. The Vision Statement calls for Emory to be

"a destination university internationally recognized as an inquiry-driven, ethically engaged, and diverse community, whose members work collaboratively for positive transformation in the world through courageous leadership in teaching, research, scholarship, health care, and social action."

This vision harmonizes with Emory's heritage, which has blended the pursuit of truth with a commitment of service to the wider community. As summed up by Emeritus Professor James Harvey Young in an earlier history of Emory, the University has sought, throughout its life, "to make the chief ends of teaching and learning not simply the advancement of scholarly knowledge and professional expertise but also the cultivation of humane wisdom and moral integrity." True to this commitment, Emory continues to shape an education for the twenty-first century that will enable the wise heart to seek knowledge for service to the world.

Read more about the history of Emory College of Arts and Sciences and Emory University.

Trustees and Administrators

Emory College Leadership

President's Cabinet

Deans

Administrative Council

Board of Trustees

Other University Administration

Contact Us

Main campus

Emory's main campus is located a few miles from downtown Atlanta in the Druid Hills neighborhood, between the Virginia Highland neighborhood and the small city of Decatur.

The Haygood-Hopkins Memorial Gateway, the traditional main entrance to campus, overlooks the intersection of North Decatur and Oxford roads.

Driving directions to main campus

From Interstate 20 Eastbound

Take exit 60-B, the Moreland Avenue exit. Turn right on Moreland and follow it approximately 3 miles. Moreland will change to Briarcliff Road once it crosses Ponce de Leon Avenue. Continue straight on Briarcliff approximately 2 miles to North Decatur Road. Turn right and follow North Decatur one mile, passing through one roundabout, to the Oxford Road intersection. Turn a soft left to enter by the main gates of the campus.

From Interstate 20 Westbound

Take exit 60, the Moreland Avenue North exit. Turn right on Moreland and follow it approximately 3 miles. Moreland will change to Briarcliff Road once it crosses Ponce de Leon Avenue. Continue straight on Briarcliff approximately 2 miles to North Decatur Road. Turn right and follow North Decatur one mile, passing through one roundabout, to the Oxford Road intersection. Turn a soft left to enter by the main gates of the campus.

From Interstate 75 North or South

Take exit 248-C, the Freedom Parkway exit. Cross Boulevard; continue on Freedom Parkway; veer left at split; continue until it ends at Ponce de Leon Avenue; then turn right. Off Ponce, turn left on Briarcliff Road. Go approximately 2 miles to North Decatur Road. Turn right and follow North Decatur Road one mile, passing through one roundabout, to the Oxford Road intersection. Turn a soft left to enter by the main gates of the campus.

From Interstate 85 North and Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

The airport is located in the southwest section of the city, approximately 25 minutes from the Emory University campus. Visitors driving from the airport should take I-85 North.

To Emory from Interstate 85 North, take exit 248-C, the Freedom Parkway exit. Cross Boulevard; continue on Freedom Parkway; veer left at split; continue until it ends at Ponce de Leon Avenue; then turn right. Off Ponce, turn left on Briarcliff Road. Go approximately 2 miles to North Decatur Road. Turn right and follow North Decatur Road one mile, passing through one roundabout, to the Oxford Road intersection. Turn a soft left to enter by the main gates of the campus.

From Interstate 85 South

Take exit 91, the Clairmont Road exit. Turn left (east) on Clairmont and follow it approximately 3 miles to North Decatur Road. Turn right and follow North Decatur approximately one mile to the Emory campus and the Oxford Road intersection. Turn right to enter by the main gates of the campus.

Using Public Transportation

MARTA schedules
http://itsmarta.com
MARTA information
404.848.5000

Atlanta's mass transit system is MARTA, which operates a coordinated system of bus and train lines around much of the Atlanta area. The Emory campus is accessible from the Lindbergh MARTA station, and from the Inman Park station via the #6-Emory bus, or from the Arts Center station and the Avondale station on the #36-North Decatur bus. Also, the #245 "Blue Flyer" Kensington/Emory express bus serves Emory from the Lindbergh and Kensington stations.

For the Clairmont Campus, take the #19-Clairmont bus from the Brookhaven or Decatur stations.

Coming from the airport, take any train northbound to the Lindbergh MARTA station, and take the #6-Emory bus to the Emory campus. Ask the bus driver to stop in Emory Village near the Emory main entrance.

Courses By Subject

African American Studies

AAS 100: Intro To Afric Amer Studies

This course introduces students to the multiple disciplines that comprise the field of African American Studies and the most salient themes and topics that continue to guide scholars' research interests. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 190: Fresh Sem: Africn Amer Studies

Variable topics in African American Studies. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 215: Jazz: Its Evolution & Essence

Critical and analytic study of jazz idioms from the turn of the century to the present, including the blues, ragtime, Dixieland, swing, bop, and modern jazz. Emphasis on such figures as Armstrong, Ellington, Parker, Monk, and Coleman. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 238: History of Afric.Amer. to 1865

The course examines the experiences of African Americans from the emergence of the transatlantic slave trade to the end of the Civil War. Emphasizes social and cultural history and interpretation of race, class, and gender. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 239: Hist.of Afric.Amer. Since 1865

Examines African American history from 1865 to the present. Emphasizes regional, gender, and class distinction within African American communities, and the ways in which industrial transformations shaped African American life, thought, and resistance. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 239W: Hist.of Afric.Amer. Since 1865

Examines African American history from 1865 to the present. Emphasizes regional, gender, and class distinction within African American communities, and the ways in which industrial transformations shaped African American life, thought, and resistance. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 247: Racial & Ethnic Relations

Relations between and within groups, and conflict and cooperation in light of a number of models of social interaction. Application of principles to racial, religious, and ethnic minorities. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 261: Survey Af-Am Lit Before 1900

An overview of African-American literature prior to 1900. Students will read and examine writings by major contributors to each period in the genres of fiction (short story and novel) essay, poetry, and narratives of enslavement. Students will write four five-page critical essays. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 261W: Survey Af-Am Lit Before 1900

An overview of African-American literature prior to 1900. Students will read and examine writings by major contributors to each period in the genres of fiction (short story and novel) essay, poetry, and narratives of enslavement. Students will write four five-page critical essays. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 262: Survey Af-Am Lit Since 1900

An overview of African-American literature since 1900. Students will read and examine writings by major contributors to each period in the genres of fiction (short story and novel) essay, poetry, and narratives of enslavement. Students will write and revise four five-page critical essays. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 262W: Survey Af-Am Lit Since 1900

An overview of African-American literature since 1900. Students will read and examine writings by major contributors to each period in the genres of fiction (short story and novel) essay, poetry, and narratives of enslavement. Students will write and revise four five-page critical essays. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 267: The Civil Rights Movement

An exploration and analysis of the struggle for African American equality with an emphasis on the Civil Rights Movement's development, successes, failures and legacy. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 267W: The Civil Rights Movement

An exploration and analysis of the struggle for African American equality with an emphasis on the Civil Rights Movement's development, successes, failures and legacy. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 272: Race, Gender & Visual Repres

This course explores representations of race and gender in American and European art and culture and the strategies and modes of visual representation that African Americans and members of the African Diaspora community deployed to counter derogatory images. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 274: Black Resistance Mvmt in Amer

This course will trace the trajectory of black resistance in America, from seemingly spontaneous slave revolts, to a few major, highly organized efforts, such as the Civil Rights Movement. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 275: Black Images In the Media

Students in this course will study representations of blacks in major forms of mass media, including newspapers, literature, radio, tv, and film. Students will explore the evolution of those representations and the impact of negative portrayals on the self-images of blacks and society at large. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 279: Intro.to African American Art

The purpose of this course is to examine African American art and some of the historical and cultural considerations that affected the nature of its developments. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 285: Special Topics in AAS

Wide range of topics pertinent to the African American experience. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

AAS 285W: Special Topics in AAS

Wide range of topics pertinent to the African American experience. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

AAS 288: Black Women's Poetry

This course introduces the lesser known poets and poetry of black women in the United States and abroad; explains the elements of poetry and how to analyze a poem; and discusses the aspects of poetry orally and in writing. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 303: Black Music

This course considers the idea of Black Music. What is it? What does it sound like? Who created it? These musical questions are set in the context of an equally complicated web of ideas about race and the relationship between racial expectation and black music/cultural production. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 304: Music & Revolution in 1960s

The 1960s was a decade of turbulence and dramatic social and cultural change. The war in Vietnam, the civil rights and Black Nationalist movements, the so-called sexual revolution, and the popularization of psychedelic drugs all had considerable impact in shaping the musical culture of the day. This course considers the music of the period, the relationships between musical forms, and the shifting relationships between the communities associated with them. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 306: Music of Harlem Renaissance

Designed to introduce the student to the music associated with the so-called Harlem Renaissance. The course will examine African American and American works, composers, and performers referred to in the famous essays and controversies of this important period. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 306W: Music of Harlem Renaissance

Designed to introduce the student to the music associated with the so-called Harlem Renaissance. The course will examine African American and American works, composers, and performers referred to in the famous essays and controversies of this important period. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 307: Bebop and Beyond

This more advanced jazz history course focuses on the various styles and trends in jazz since 1945. The course will look specifically at Bebop, the Post Bop musics such as Hard Bop and Funky Bop, and the Cool School, Third Stream, avant-garde expressions, Fusion, Jazz Rock, and Acid Jazz. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 318: Art and Social Change

The purpose of this class is to examine how African American art forms have addressed social issues and affected social change over time. Visual art, literature, music and contemporary media may be discussed. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 320R: African - American Religion

Development of religion among African Americans; trends and tendencies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 320RW: African - American Religion

Development of religion among African Americans; trends and tendencies. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 325: Black Love

"Explores historical & contemporary notions of love with emphasis on love's powerful & controversial presence/absence in the lives of Black people in the North American context. Readings include religious studies, philosophical, historical, literary, social scientific and neurobiological texts.". General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 326: Black Christian Thought

Spiritual transformations involving worship, magic and healing, ritual, and aesthetic performance in Black speech and literature, music, and drama; and spiritual uses of Biblical themes to empower social political movements. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 326W: Black Christian Thought

Spiritual transformations involving worship, magic and healing, ritual, and aesthetic performance in Black speech and literature, music, and drama; and spiritual uses of Biblical themes to empower social political movements. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 334: Contemporary African Politics

Politics of sub-Saharan Africa are examined, with emphasis on the major issues of social and political analysis as well as the African economic predicament and its political implications. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 345: The Black Freedom Struggle

Students will explore the various typologies of African American resistance movements, including civil rights liberalism, Black nationalism, Black power, Black feminism, Black conservatism, and LGBT movements in the post-emancipation period. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 346: African American Politics

Comprehensive examination of African American politics and its critical influence upon the American political system. Civil rights and black power movements; the voting rights act and redistricting; African American political participation, attitudes, and governance. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 350: African American Pedagogy

African Americans created a model of educational excellence during de jure segregated schools whose historical practices link with West Africa and whose implications extend to Finland. The class explores the components of this model and considers their implications for contemporary practice. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 352: Issues in Black Education

This course utilizes foundational qualitative research methodology and literature review skills to allow students to explore a variety of class-identified issues challenging the successful engagement of African American students in educational spaces. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 355: Historical Arts of Africa

Traditional genres of African art with a focus on masks and figure sculpture in West and Central African city-states and chiefdoms from 1500 to European colonization. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 358: Studies in AF/AM Lit to 1900

Major literary traditions of African American writers to 1900. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 358W: Studies in AF/AM Lit to 1900

Major literary traditions of African American writers to 1900. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 359: Studies AF/AM Lit.1900-Present

A topics course dealing with major traditions and issues in African American literature from 1900 to the present. Possible topics include passing and miscegenation, black novels since 1950, Afrofuturism, and black theater. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 359W: Studies AF/AM Lit.1900-Present

A topics course dealing with major traditions and issues in African American literature from 1900 to the present. Possible topics include passing and miscegenation, black novels since 1950, Afrofuturism, and black theater. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 360: Ethnic Minority Families

Examines a variety of ethnic groups in terms of strengths as well as weaknesses, lodging these characterizations in historical socioeconomic contexts and focusing on the structure and functioning of family life. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 364: Afric.Civilztn.Tranatl.Slave

Political, social, economic, and cultural history of sub-Saharan African civilizations, from the rise of the Sudanic empires through the impact of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 364W: Afric.Civilztn.Tranatl.Slave

Political, social, economic, and cultural history of sub-Saharan African civilizations, from the rise of the Sudanic empires through the impact of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 370: Education History in Georgia

This course examines the cyclical intersection of politics, education, and race in the history of public school education in Georgia from the Civil War to the present era, considering both the forms of systemic oppression as well as the continuity of community responses. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 371: Anth.of African Americans

An exploration of the complexity and diversity of African American culture in the United States from the perspectives of twentieth century anthropologists. Major themes include: (i) the influence of African culture on the populations of the Caribbean and the United States, (ii) the legacy of slavery throughout the Diaspora, and (iii) the extent to which racism and sexism as systems of inequality affect everyday life in African American communities. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 371W: Anth.of African Americans

An exploration of the complexity and diversity of African American culture in the United States from the perspectives of twentieth century anthropologists. Major themes include: (i) the influence of African culture on the populations of the Caribbean and the United States, (ii) the legacy of slavery throughout the Diaspora, and (iii) the extent to which racism and sexism as systems of inequality affect everyday life in African American communities. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 375: Topics Black Women's Studies

The course examines how constructions of race and gender control the way black women are represented in literature, film and popular culture from the 19th c. to the present. Students will look carefully at American and Western ideologies of black women. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 378: Topics: Blk.Cultural Movements

This course will examine the relationships of black cultural movements to their historical periods and approach the movements as interdisciplinary phenomena. Movements that have been covered in the past include the Black Arts Movement, the New Negro Renaissance, and the Black Power movement. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3-4.

AAS 381: Race & the American Presidency

This course explores the historical relationship between Blacks and chief executives and the range of presidential attitudes and actions pertaining to the problems of slavery and emancipation, segregation, discrimination, and economic exploitation. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 382: Race & American Political Dev

This course explores the ideological and structural foundations of race in American political culture. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 384: Slavery in US Hist & Culture

An in-depth study of the current historical knowledge of 19th century slavery in the southern United States; and how slavery has been depicted in popular culture, films and literature in the 20th and 21st centuries. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 385: Topics in Afr Amer Studies

This course explores one of a wide range of topics pertaining to the African American experience in the fields of human and civil rights, social and literary texts, and the social sciences. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

AAS 385W: Topics in Afr Amer Studies

This course explores one of a wide range of topics pertaining to the African American experience in the fields of human and civil rights, social and literary texts, and the social sciences. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

AAS 387RW: GA Civil Rights Cold Cases

Intermediate level workshop in writing and researching Southern Georgia's Civil Rights history. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 388: Topics:Race,Gender,& the South

The "South" has played a central role in our national imagination.This course explores the ways in which certain stereotypes suchas Southern Bell, Mammy, Southern Gentleman, Jezebel, and Uncle Tom remain relevant across the decades. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 398R: Directed Readings

Students will explore aspects of African American history and culture in collaboration with a faculty member and complete a research project based upon a mutually agreed upon reading list. Credit Hours: 1-12.

AAS 410: American Human Rights Policy

This course surveys and analyses the factors shaping the U.S. response in the 20th and 21st centuries to human rights, domestically and globally. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 410W: American Human Rights Policy

This course surveys and analyses the factors shaping the U.S. response in the 20th and 21st centuries to human rights, domestically and globally. Writing requirement. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 412: War Crimes & Genocide

This course will explore the development of international law, international consciousness and U.S. foreign policy on the two distinct but often related issues of war crimes and genocide during the late 19th and throughout the 20th centuries. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 412W: War Crimes & Genocide

This course will explore the development of international law, international consciousness and U.S. foreign policy on the two distinct but often related issues of war crimes and genocide during the late 19th and throughout the 20th centuries. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 481: Atlanta Civil Rights Histories

This course will examine the ways in which the twentieth-century black Civil Rights Movement and the movement for LGBT rights have intersected through the activism of black LGBT activists in the city of Atlanta. Students will conduct ground-breaking research in Atlanta's black LGBT community. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 481W: Atlanta Civil Rights Histories

This course will examine the ways in which the twentieth-century black Civil Rights Movement and the movement for LGBT rights have intersected through the activism of black LGBT activists in the city of Atlanta. Students will conduct ground-breaking research in Atlanta's black LGBT community . General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 482: Black Women Writers

Course focuses on the works of 19th and 20th century black women writers. Writers vary but may include the works of Harriet Jacobs,Pauline Hopkins, Zora Neale Hurston, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Gloria Naylor. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 483: Reading Alice Walker

This course explores the life, literary work, and legacy of novelist Alice Walker. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 483W: Reading Alice Walker

This course explores the life, literary work, and legacy of novelist Alice Walker. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 484: Maj. Figs: E Gaines & A Walker

General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 485: Special Topics Seminar

This advanced course explores one of a wide range of topics pertaining to the African American experience in the fields of human and civil rights, social and literary texts, and the social sciences. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

AAS 485W: Special Topics Seminar

This advanced course explores one of a wide range of topics pertaining to the African American experience in the fields of human and civil rights, social and literary texts, and the social sciences. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

AAS 490R: Senior Seminar

Spring. Multidisciplinary in nature, the readings of the senior seminar reflect the centrality of the historical and cultural contributions of African Americans to American history and culture. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AAS 490RW: Senior Seminar

Spring. Multidisciplinary in nature, the readings of the senior seminar reflect the centrality of the historical and cultural contributions of African Americans to American history and culture. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

AAS 495A: Honors Research

Fall semester. Variable credit with a maximum credit of eight hours. Prerequisite: approval of adviser and the director of undergraduate studies. Open to majors and minors writing honors thesis.Includes writing proposal for thesis requirement. Credit Hours: 1-8.

AAS 495BW: Honors Thesis

Variable credit with a maximum credit of eight hours. Prerequisite: approval of adviser and the director of undergraduate studies. Open to majors and minors writing honors thesis. Writing requirement. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

AAS 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent Emory course in African American Studies. Credit Hours: 1-99.

African Studies

AFS 110: African Language Studies I

Introductory-level African Studies language course. May be repeated for credit when language varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

AFS 150R: World Cultures

Examination of culture areas, language distributions, and social organization of societies south of the Sahara. Colonialism and modern African issues. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 190: Frsh Seminar: African Studies

Introduces first-year students to the interdisciplinary field of African Studies, including historical context, sources, and methods of inquiry; aims to improve critical reading, analytical, and writing skills in small group discussion. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 221: The Making of Modern Africa

Traces the gradual incorporation of Africa into an expanding world economy and examines the impact of this incorporation on the development of African societies and modern nation states. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 263: Intro to African Studies

Introduction to the African humanities and social sciences through in-depth study of three African regions. Explores major historical trends and their impact on culture, including the slave trade, colonialism, and postcolonial international contacts. Content is drawn from literature (both written literature and oral traditions), film, history, religion, anthropology, sociology, and art. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 270: Topic Seminar

An introductory course on African Studies. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

AFS 270W: Topic Seminar

An introductory course on African Studies. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

AFS 280R: Anthro. Perspectives

Anthropological perspectives on the people and cultures on different regions of the world. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. HSC, may be repeated when topic changes. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 282: Intro.to African Art & Museums

This course focuses on arts linked to the African continent as well as operations of museums. It examines how objects enter museum collections and what information accompanies objects when they arrive at museums. The course does not require previous study of Africa, African arts, or museums. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 302: Luso-African Texts & Cultures

This course primarily examines literary and cinematographic artistic productions of the five African countries whose official language is Portuguese. Students formulate responses in Portuguese to the various themes addressed in the different texts and films, both orally and in writing. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: PORT 201 as prerequisite.

AFS 302W: Luso-African Texts & Cultures

This course primarily examines literary and cinematographic artistic productions of the five African countries whose official language is Portuguese. Students formulate responses in Portuguese to the various themes addressed in the different texts and films, both orally and in writing. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: PORT 201 as prerequisite.

AFS 311: Nutritional Anthropology

Introduction to the evolution, diversity, and social significance of human diet and nutrition. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 312: Women In Africa

The varied experience of women in Africa, with attention to the impact of colonization and decolonization on women's lives and cultures. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 319: Media,Islam,& Social Movements

How do we understand the events that recently erupted with different degrees of violence in North African and Middle Eastern countries? Why were experts including diplomats, pundits, and politicians taken by surprise? How do media outlets like CNN, BBC, and Al Jazeera cover this "social uprising"?. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 334: Contemporary African Politics

Politics of sub-Saharan Africa are examined, with emphasis on the major issues of social and political analysis as well as the African economic predicament and its political implications. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 345: Gender Violence/Gender Justice

This course will examine sexual violence and gender in conflict, transitional justice, and post-conflict. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 353: Pol.Econ.of M.East & N. Africa

This course is a systematic and empirical journey through the economic, political and governance landscapes of Europe, Middle East and North Africa through a comparative assessment of the evolution of state institutions and markets. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 353W: Pol.Econ.of M.East & N.Africa

This course is a systematic and empirical journey through the economic, political and governance landscapes of Europe, Middle East and North Africa through a comparative assessment of the evolution of state institutions and markets. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

AFS 355: Historical Arts of Africa

Traditional genres of African art with a focus on masks and figure sculpture in West and Central African city-states and chiefdoms from 1500 to European colonization. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 364: Afric.Civilztn.Tranatl.Slave

Political, social, economic, and cultural history of sub-Saharan African civilizations, from the rise of the Sudanic empires through the impact of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 364W: Afric.Civilztn.Tranatl.Slave

Political, social, economic, and cultural history of sub-Saharan African civilizations, from the rise of the Sudanic empires through the impact of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

AFS 366: Development Issues for Africa

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to explore issues in economic development viewed from the perspective of sub-Saharan Africa from the impact of slavery and colonialism to the modern era of globalization. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON101/112/Bus 201 as prereq.

AFS 366W: Development Issues for Africa

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to explore issues in economic development viewed from the perspective of sub-Saharan Africa from the impact of slavery and colonialism to the modern era of globalization. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON101/112/Bus 201 as prereq.

AFS 367: The Making of South Africa

Evolution of South Africa from a society based on the principle of systematic racial segregation to a multiracial democracy. Origins of racial segregation and apartheid, nationalist struggles, challenges of post-apartheid development. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 386: Postcolonial African Art

Treatment of the major issues raised by the new genres of art that have resulted from the African experience of European colonization. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 389: Special Topics:African Studies

May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

AFS 389W: Special Topics:African Studies

May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

AFS 398: Dir Reading:African Studies

A course of readings decided in consultation with a member of the faculty. Instructor permission required to enroll. Credit Hours: 1-4.

AFS 456W: Capitalism and Anthropocene

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course is an exploration in world history, with a particular interest in how humans have altered planetary processes such as climate. A central issue will be understanding the historical development of capitalism. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

AFS 468: Economic Development in Africa

Analysis of economic behavior in low income countries, with attention to factors that promote or inhibit sustainable development, such as local cultural practices, migratory patterns, and foreign investment. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 489: Spec.Topics Sem.:African Stud.

Study of particular subjects pertaining to African Studies. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

AFS 489W: Spec.Topics Sem.:African Stud.

Study of particular subjects pertaining to African Studies. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

AFS 490R: Senior Sem in African Studies

Study of particular subjects pertaining to African Studies. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 3.

AFS 495A: Honors Thesis

Open to students approved by the department to write an honors thesis. Credit Hours: 4.

AFS 495BW: African Studies Honors

Open to students approved by the department to write an honors thesis. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

AFS 498R: Supervised Reading

A course of readings decided in consultation with a member of the faculty. Instructor permission required to enroll. Credit Hours: 1-4.

AFS 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in African Studies. Credit Hours: 1-99.

American Studies

AMST 190: Freshman Sem: American Studies

Fall, spring. Variable topics related to the U.S. and the Americas that combine interdisciplinary perspectives and methods from the humanities and social sciences. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

AMST 201: Intro. to American Studies

An interdisciplinary, historically grounded introduction to scholarly approaches to the U.S. and the broader Americas, with emphasis on issues of class, ethnicity, gender, and cross-cultural studies. Pre-requisite: ENG 223 Rhetorical Grammar (1 credit), which can be taken simultaneously. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AMST 201W: Intro. to American Studies

An interdisciplinary, historically grounded introduction to scholarly approaches to the U.S. and the broader Americas, with emphasis on issues of class, ethnicity, gender, and cross-cultural studies. Pre-requisite: ENG 223 Rhetorical Grammar (1 credit), which can be taken simultaneously. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENG 223 as corequisite.

AMST 253: US Politics/Popular Culture

An introduction to the study of popular culture--movies, pulp fiction, music, and television--in the context of historical analysis. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AMST 253W: US Politics/Popular Culture

An introduction to the study of popular culture--movies, pulp fiction, music, and television--in the context of historical analysis. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

AMST 285: Spec Top: American Questions

Seminars arranged around current issues and controversies in American culture. May be repeated as topic changes. . Credit Hours: 1-4.

AMST 285W: Spec Top: American Questions

Seminars arranged around current issues and controversies in American culture. May be repeated as topic changes . General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

AMST 321: American Routes

Explores the variety of traditional musical cultures in the United States, their historical and geographical influences on each other, and their influences on contemporary popular music. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AMST 322: Baseball and American Culture

Examines the history if the sport from its nineteenth-century beginnings to the present day, including its engagement with changing social realities and persistent social myths. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AMST 322W: Baseball and American Culture

Examines the history if the sport from its nineteenth-century beginnings to the present day, including its engagement with changing social realities and persistent social myths. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

AMST 330: Segregated Cinema in Atlanta

This course examines the interaction of race relations and ordinary leisure of movie-going from 1895-1996. Attention to the business of distribution and the content of film shown in segregated venues. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AMST 348: Ethnic Experience in America

African Americans, Indians, Irish, and Jews in recent American history. Explores patterns of immigration and the limits of assimilation. Also treats anti-ethnic reactions such as racism and anti-Semitism. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

AMST 385: Special Top: American Studies

Specialized courses in American culture and history. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

AMST 385W: Special Top: American Studies

Specialized courses in American culture and history. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

AMST 387RW: GA Civil Rights Cold Cases

Intermediate level workshop in writing and researching Southern Georgia's Civil Rights history. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

AMST 388: Topics:Race,Gender,& the South

The "South" has played a central role in our national imagination.This course explores the ways in which certain stereotypes suchas Southern Bell, Mammy, Southern Gentleman, Jezebel, and Uncle Tom remain relevant across the decades. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AMST 489: Adv Spec Topics American St

An advanced interdisciplinary treatment of American culture issues, historical events or eras, or literature. The ILA and AMST programs support interdisciplinary inquiry of the Americas across Emory College of Arts and Sciences; this course will be frequently cross-listed with other departments. Credit Hours: 1-4.

AMST 489W: Adv Spec Topics American St

An advanced interdisciplinary treatment of American culture issues, historical events or eras, or literature. The ILA and AMST programs support interdisciplinary inquiry of the Americas across Emory College of Arts and Sciences; this course will be frequently cross-listed with other departments. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

AMST 490: Senior Seminar

IDS 491 senior seminar serves as the capstone experience for all each class of interdisciplinary undergraduate scholars. Students write and present a portion of their senior project, read contemporary debates about interdisciplinarity, and design a shared unit of interdisciplinary study. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

AMST 490W: Senior Seminar

IDS 491 senior seminar serves as the capstone experience for all each class of interdisciplinary undergraduate scholars. Students write and present a portion of their senior project, read contemporary debates about interdisciplinarity, and design a shared unit of interdisciplinary study. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

AMST 495R: Honors Thesis

Fall, spring. Prerequisite: permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Open only to honors candidates in their senior year. Independent research, culminating in the thesis. . General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

AMST 495RW: Honors Thesis

Fall, spring. Prerequisite: permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Open only to honors candidates in their senior year. Independent research, culminating in the thesis. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-8.

AMST 496R: Internship

Credit variable. Prerequisite: permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Opportunity to integrate the theory and practice of studying American culture and history. Credit Hours: 1-6.

AMST 498R: Supervised Reading and Study

Credit variable. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and the director of undergraduate studies. Study of an area not covered in regular course offerings. Credit Hours: 2-4.

AMST 499R: Senior Research

Credit variable. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and the director of undergraduate studies. Independent research and writing on a topic associated with the area of concentration in the major, undertaken with faculty supervision. Credit Hours: 2-4.

AMST 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Course number used for administrative purposes.Non-equivalent transfer course in American Studies. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies

ANCMED 101: Intro to Anc't Med Societies

Social, anthropological, and cultural aspects of two or more ancient Mediterranean cultures from a comparative perspective. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANCMED 190: Freshmen Seminar

Variable topics course introducing students to the interrelated cultures and histories of the ancient Mediterranean world. Emphasis is on the study and interpretation of primary texts and objects, including those in Emory's Carlos Museum. . General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

ANCMED 201R: Mediterranean Archaeology

Cultural history of the ancient Mediterranean through an examination of the materials, methods, and history of archaeology. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANCMED 202R: Literature & Traditions

Interdisciplinary study of texts and themes from ancient Greece, Rome, Egypt, and the Near East, and their reception in Western and Near Eastern traditions from antiquity to the present. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ANCMED 495A: Honors Independent Writing

Honors thesis research and writing. Credit Hours: 4.

ANCMED 495BW: Honors Independent Writing

Honors thesis research and writing. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ANCMED 498R: Independent Writing

Senior thesis written under direction of an advisor from the program core faculty. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ANCMED 498RW: Independent Writing

Senior thesis written under direction of an advisor from the program core faculty. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ANCMED 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Ancient Mediterranean Studies. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Anthropology

ANT 101: Introduction to Anthropology

Survey of the study of the human species: its evolution, prehistory, language, and comparative social and cultural systems. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 185: Anthropology: Special Topics

Seminar or Lecture series on topics of anthropological interest at an introductory level. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ANT 185W: Anthropology: Special Topics

Seminar or Lecture series on topics of anthropological interest at an introductory level. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ANT 190: Freshman Seminar:Anthropology

Seminar on various anthropological topics. Satisfies general education Freshman Seminar. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 200: Foundations of Behavior

This course presents an introduction to evolutionary processes and biological bases of behavior. Lectures and readings will be organized around a developmental and life history perspective and will emphasize the importance of context in biological mechanisms and the interaction of social life, behavior, and cognition. Examples drawn especially from humans and nonhuman primates will be used to place human behavior in the Context of other species and to illustrate the dual inheritance of biology and culture in our species. Topics covered will include evolutionary mechanisms, adaptation, phylogenetic constraints, neural and neuroendocrine mechanisms of behavior, life history theory, developmental programs, principles of allometry, sexual selection and alternative reproductive strategies, social bonds and socialization, and the cognitive bases of social interaction in humans and nonhumans. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 201: Concepts & Meth in Biol Anth

Biological and cultural evolution and adaptation of the human species, fossil populations, human variation, and primate behavior. Methods in biological anthropology, survey of the prehistoric evolution of cultures, contemporary issues in paleoanthropology. Weekly lab in biological anthro methods. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 202: Concepts & Meth in Cult Anth

Basic concepts and theories of cultural anthropology and linguistics. Comparative economic and political systems, social organization and the family, belief systems, and modes of communication. Diverse levels of sociocultural complexity from primitive tribes to industrial societies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 202W: Concepts & Meth in Cult Anth

Basic concepts and theories of cultural anthropology and linguistics. Comparative economic and political systems, social organization and the family, belief systems, and modes of communication. Diverse levels of sociocultural complexity from primitive tribes to industrial societies. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 5.

ANT 203: Foundations of Linguistics

An introduction to the systematic study of human language, surveying the fields of phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, sociolinguistics, child language acquisition, and historical linguistics. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 204: Introduction to Archaeology

Principles of archaeological analysis and field excavation. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 205: Foundations of Global Health

An introduction to the overall field of global health, its history, methods, and key principles, with case studies illustrating the burden of disease in nations with strikingly different political-economic contexts. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 207: Foundation Development Studies

Introduces students to the growing field of development studies and provides a solid foundation for subsequent course work in the Minor. Key topics include human rights, gender, environment, poverty and inequality, democratic reforms and governance, market reforms, rural development, and conflict. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 210: Hum Biol:Life Cycle Approach

Human biology from conception to senescence, in an evolutionary and cross-cultural context, emphasizing neural and neuroendocrine processes underlying behavior and reproduction. Conception, fetal development, birth, infant growth, puberty, pregnancy, adult sexuality, and aging. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 217: East Asian Calligraphy

Studies East Asian calligraphy in artistic, cultural, and historical contexts, starting with the immediate aspects of calligraphy as a traditional art form, and then reaching beyond the classically defined discipline to examine its aesthetic values, intellectual metaphors, and moral criteria. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 217W: East Asian Calligraphy

Studies East Asian calligraphy in artistic, cultural, and historical contexts, starting with the immediate aspects of calligraphy as a traditional art form, and then reaching beyond the classically defined discipline to examine its aesthetic values, intellectual metaphors, and moral criteria. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 230: Medical Anthropology

Comparative study of disease ecology and medical systems of other cultures; sociocultural factors affecting contemporary world health problems; cultural aspects of ethnomedicine and biomedicine; ethnicity and health care. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 230W: Medical Anthropology

Comparative study of disease ecology and medical systems of other cultures; sociocultural factors affecting contemporary world health problems; cultural aspects of ethnomedicine and biomedicine; ethnicity and health care. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 231: Predictive Health and Society

This course introduces the evidence base for the science of health and emphasizes STEM educational translations to the population, clinic and individual levels. Innovative efforts are needed to drive changes in health care from a reactive, disease-focused system to a proactive health-focused one. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 240: Language and Culture

Study of language in context, focusing on relations between language and culture, thought, social identity, and political process. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 240W: Language and Culture

Study of language in context, focusing on relations between language and culture, thought, social identity, and political process. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 250: Today's World: Special Topics

Course surveys cultural diversity in the contemporary world through current ethnographies from different world areas. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ANT 250W: Today's World: Special Topics

Course surveys cultural diversity in the contemporary world through current ethnographies from different world areas. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ANT 252: Fast Food/Slow Food

Debates and issues of the contemporary industrial food system and emerging alternatives; experiential learning in farmers markets, cooking, and local farm; independent research and ethical alternatives for a more sustainable food system. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 258: Anthropology of the Jews

Introduction to Jewish populations and cultures within the framework of four fields of general anthropology: biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 270: Quantitative Methods for Anth

The aim of this course is to show how anthropologists (biological, cultural, and archaeologists) structure their research hypotheses, organize their data, select and run statistics, and describe their written results and discussions. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 280R: Anthro. Perspectives

Anthropological perspectives on the people and cultures on different regions of the world. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. HSC, may be repeated when topic changes. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 285: Anthropology; Special Topics

Seminar or lecture series on topics of anthropological interest at an intermediate level. Maybe repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ANT 285W: Anthropology; Special Topics

Seminar or lecture series on topics of anthropological interest at an intermediate level. Maybe repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ANT 302: Primate Behavior & Ecology

This course surveys the social behavior, behavioral ecology, and adaptations of nonhuman primate species, the extant prosimians, monkeys, and apes. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 303: Modern Human Origins

This course will examine the origins of modern humans, their unique cultural abilities, and their relationships to more archaic beings, such as Neanderthals. What makes us human and how we evolved will be explored. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 304W: Paleolithic Archaeology

This class surveys issues, methods and theory in Paleolithic Archaeology. Rather than providing a detailed review of prehistory, it examines key debates and the methods used to address them. Special attention is given to stone tool analysis, including substantial practical work. work. General Education Requirement: SNTW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ANT 201 or 204 as prerequisite.

ANT 305: The Human Brain

Upper-level intro to basis of complex human behavior in the brain, focused on human brain structure and function. The overall goal is to master the anatomy underlying higher human capacities, acknowledging how our brain's evolutionary past can inform our understanding of how the brain works now. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 306: Primate Mating Strategies

Comparative study of primate mating strategies and sexual behavior. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 306W: Primate Mating Strategies

Comparative study of primate mating strategies and sexual behavior. General Education Requirement: SNTW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 307: Human Evolution

This class aims to integrate data and theory from genetics, geology, and paleoanthropological evidence to trace the evolution of the human species. Opposing theories regarding the interpretation of data will be the focus of student evaluation. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 307W: Human Evolution

This class aims to integrate data and theory from genetics, geology, and paleoanthropological evidence to trace the evolution of the human species. Opposing theories regarding the interpretation of data will be the focus of student evaluation. General Education Requirement: SNTW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 308: Evolution of Social Behavior

Prerequisite: Anthropology 201 or Biology 142. Application of evolutionary theory to social behavior of a variety of animals, including humans. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 309: Seminar in Primate Behavior

Prerequisite: Anthropology 101, 201, or 302. Relationship between ecology and individual and social behavior, dominance relations, intelligence, and communication. Topic varies. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 310: Communication in Primates

This course examines human as well as non-human primate communication systems from an evolutionary perspective. Topics covered include signal structure and function, information content of signals, honesty, deceit, and the evolution of language in humans. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 311: Nutritional Anthropology

Introduction to the evolution, diversity, and social significance of human diet and nutrition. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 312: Human Skeletal Biology

This course focuses on theory and method for understanding variation in prehistoric skeletal populations. Determination of age and sexual activity, disease and demography will be undertaken. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 6.

ANT 314: Race&Racism:Myths&Realities

The social construction of race relies on differences that lack biological significance. The social and biological cast of racism from the continued entrenched concept of race in America is considered. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 315: Ancient DNA & Human Evolution

The course focuses on the key methods adopted in the study of ancient DNA, such as next generation sequencing and population genetics, as well as a thematic approach to the major evolutionary questions. Topics include human migrations, archaic humans, domestication, and ancient pathogens. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 316: Evolution: Human Brain & Mind

This course is concerned with evaluating neuroscientific, psychological and behavioral evidence of modern human cognitive specializations as well as archeological, paleontological, and comparative evidence of their evolutionary origins. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 317: Human Social Neuroscience

Neurobiological substrates supporting human social cognition and behavior. Review and synthesis of relevant research in neuropsychology, psychiatry, neuroimaging, and experimental animal research. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 318: Predicting Lifespan Health

This is a research seminar exploring the intersection of genomics, the environment, and lifestyle/behavior as it pertains to human health from a developmental perspective with the aim of understanding human health over the lifespan. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 319: Anthropology of Fatherhood

This course will describe and explain variation in male parental care across species, across cultures and across individuals within a culture. Emphasis will be placed on hormonal and neurobiological foundations of paternal care, evolutionary theory, ethnography and developmental psychology. . Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 324: Women in Cross-Cultr Persp

Cross-cultural study of gender and women's lives in diverse cultures, including the United States; comparative study of work, child-rearing, power, politics, religion, and prestige. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 325: Language, Gender and Sexuality

Cross-cultural examination of how language reflects, maintains, and constructs gender identities. Topics include differences in male/female speech, the grammatical encoding of gender and childhood language socialization. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 328: Women, Religion & Ethnography

Cross-cultural ethnographic study of women's religious lives, including ritual and leadership roles, forms and contexts of religious expression, and negotiations between dominant cultural representations and women's self-representations. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 328W: Women, Religion & Ethnography

Cross-cultural ethnographic study of women's religious lives, including ritual and leadership roles, forms and contexts of religious expression, and negotiations between dominant cultural representations and women's self-representations. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 330: Global Food Security

This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of food insecurity. To do so, we study what food insecurity is, how it is defined and measured, how it is experienced and managed by people in different settings, what causes it, and what its consequences are for human well-being. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 331: Cross-Cult Iss in Mental Hlth

Focuses on cultural approaches to mental health and illness. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 333: Disease & Human Behavior

Biological and cultural adaptations to disease, the role of specific diseases in evolution, social epidemiological patterns related to culture, contemporary issues in disease control, and economic development. Diseases covered include malaria, tuberculosis, AIDS, diabetes, and depression. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 334: Evolutionary Medicine

Biological and cultural adaptations to disease, the role of specific diseases in evolution, social epidemiological patterns related to culture, contemporary issues in disease control, and economic development. Considers a variety of diseases including malaria, tuberculosis, AIDS, and malnutrition. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 335: Women's Hlth:Anth & Fem Persp

Exploration of issues pertaining to women's bodies and health, juxtaposing Western women's health problems with those faced by women in the non-Western (i.e., developing) world. The disciplinary/analytical perspectives of medical anthropology and feminist scholarship will be compared. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 336: Anth. of Emerging Disease

Disease emerges as humans disrupt their environment, exposing them to novel pathogens. Students will examine this pattern from the Paleolithic to the present pattern of globalization of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 336W: Anth. of Emerging Disease

Disease emerges as humans disrupt their environment, exposing them to novel pathogens. Students will examine this pattern from the Paleolithic to the present pattern of globalization of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. General Education Requirement: SNTW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 337: Religion Health and Healing

This class explores issues such as what makes for a healthy self or person, the role of religious practices and belief in healing, and the relationship of body and mind. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 338: Global Health:Biosocial Model

This course surveys the global landscape of challenges to physical and mental health that confront us today, and traces the emergence of biosocial approaches to both explaining and tackling these challenges. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 338W: Global Health: Biosocial Model

This course surveys the global landscape of challenges to physical and mental health that confront us today, and traces the emergence of biosocial approaches to both explaining and tackling these challenges. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 339: Defining Health: Biocult.Persp

Evolutionary perspectives provide a background for understanding the limitations imposed by biomedical frameworks in our understanding of human biological variability. Flexibility in gene expression and human phenotypes reflect the importance of biocultural influences on health. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 340: Topics in Sociolinguistics

This course studies relations between language and society, relations between language and sociocultural context. Topics may include: language variation; multilingualism; verbal interaction; discourse analysis; ethnography of communication; sociolinguistics of Spanish. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ANT 340W: Topics in Sociolinguistics

This course studies relations between language and society, relations between language and sociocultural context. Topics may include: language variation; multilingualism; verbal interaction; discourse analysis; ethnography of communication; sociolinguistics of Spanish. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ANT 341: Advanced Language and Culture

In-depth study of the relationship between language and culture by examining anthropological approaches to the study of language. You will learn how language both reflects and creates thought, culture and power relationships. You will also learn basic ethnographic methodology through a research project. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 342: Media and Culture

Explores the sociocultural dynamics of media institutions and the everyday use of different media in diverse societies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 342W: Media and Culture

Explores the sociocultural dynamics of media institutions and the everyday use of different media in diverse societies. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 343: Ethnographic Cinema

The course offers an introduction to ethnographic cinema. It focuses on classic and contemporary films. Students explore issues concerning the nature of evidence, salvage anthropology, the politics of representation, concepts of participation and collaboration, aesthetics and ethnography. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 351: Sustainable Dev: Anthro Persp

Anthropological perspectives on social change and economic development in the Third World today. Population growth, agricultural development, political instability, colonialism, imperialism, and urban problems in cultural context. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 351W: Sustainable Dev:Anthro Persp

Anthropological perspectives on social change and economic development in the Third World today. Population growth, agricultural development, political instability, colonialism, imperialism, and urban problems in cultural context. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 352: Globalizatn&Transnational Cult

This course explores the changing shape of the global economy and its relationships. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 352W: Globalizatn&Transnational Cult

This course explores the changing shape of the global economy and its relationships. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 355: Shipwrecks, Pirates, Palaces

An exploration of the archaeological evidence for economic patterns in the ancient Mediterranean world, including the emergence of complex, hierarchized centers, long distance networks, maritime trade and predation, coinage, and slavery. Case studies range from Mesopotamia to the Roman world. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 363: Ritual: Its Nature & Culture

Survey of the significance and functions of ritual in human life. Ethnographic accounts of sacred ritual followed by more theoretical readings dealing with the structure and function of human ritual, viewed as a special and primitive form of communication. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 366: Ritual and Shakespeare

Close reading of selected plays of Shakespeare in which ritual and other performance genres become central issues and problems. Readings in performance theory parallel reading of the plays. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 368: Classics and Anthropology

Examination of the history of cooperative efforts between classics and anthropology, and focuses on ongoing efforts in studies of ritual and religion, kinship studies, and archaeological theory. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 368W: Classics and Anthropology

Examination of the history of cooperative efforts between classics and anthropology, and focuses on ongoing efforts in studies of ritual and religion, kinship studies, and archaeological theory. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 369: Anthropology of Death & Burial

The course provides a multi-disciplinary approach to the universal human experience of death. It covers themes such as the process of death (biological and cultural), the human cadaver, grief and mourning, ritual responses, mass death, suicide, ethical issues, etc. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 369W: Anthropology of Death & Burial

The course provides a multi-disciplinary approach to the universal human experience of death. It covers themes such as the process of death (biological and cultural), the human cadaver, grief and mourning, ritual responses, mass death, suicide, ethical issues, etc. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 372: Ethnographic Methods & Writing

This course is about the writing of fieldwork-based case studies as a central practice anthropology. Students learn to read classical and contemporary ethnographic texts critically for content, method and style, as well as to produce ethnographic writing by combining description with analysis. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 372W: Ethnographic Methods & Writing

This course is about the writing of fieldwork-based case studies as a central practice anthropology. Students learn to read classical and contemporary ethnographic texts critically for content, method and style, as well as to produce ethnographic writing by combining description with analysis. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 377: Fieldwork into Performance

This course introduces students to ethnographic fieldwork methods and explores through both case study analysis and class-based ethnodrama processes how applied theater and performance (theater, dance, and spoken word) can be used to present anthropological insights and ethnographic material. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 377W: Fieldwork into Performance

This course introduces students to ethnographic fieldwork methods and explores through both case study analysis and class-based ethnodrama processes how applied theater and performance (theater, dance, and spoken word) can be used to present anthropological insights and ethnographic material. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 380: Muslim Cultures and Politics

How have anthropologists approached the study of Muslim cultures and politics and what have we learned from their scholarship about ritual and religion, gender and subjectivity, law and social justice, and the politics and poetics of "writing culture"?. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 381: Primate Conservation

This course reviews the local human and biological impact of conservation programs that affect primate communities in five areas of the world. Students discuss: methods, primate/plant interactions, forest fragmentation, historical perspectives on conservation and land use, agroforestry, ecotourism, and reintroductions. Students will become more aware of how conservation issues affect behavior and ecology of primates in nature. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 381W: Primate Conservation

This course reviews the local human and biological impact of conservation programs that affect primate communities in five areas of the world. Students discuss: methods, primate/plant interactions, forest fragmentation, historical perspectives on conservation and land use, agroforestry, ecotourism, and reintroductions. Students will become more aware of how conservation issues affect behavior and ecology of primates in nature. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 382: Ecol Context Human Evolution

Uses an ecological perspective to address the basic question of why and how humans evolved. Discussions include scrutinizing both biotic and abiotic factors that may have influenced the evolution of early hominids in East Africa. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 383: Primate Evolution & Extinction

This course focuses on the biological and ecological processes that have influenced primate anatomy, behavior, distribution, evolution, and extinction, as evidenced in the fossil record. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 385: Special Topics: Anthropology

(May be repeated for credit when topic varies.) Seminar or lecture series of topics of anthropological concern. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ANT 385W: Special Topics: Anthropology

(May be repeated for credit when topic varies.) Seminar or lecture series of topics of anthropological concern. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ANT 386: Special Topics:Anthropology

May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Seminar or lecture series of topics of anthropological concern. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ANT 386W: Special Topics:Anthropology

May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Seminar or lecture series of topics of anthropological concern. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ANT 387: Special Topics:Anthropology

Seminar or lecture series of topics of anthropological concern.May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ANT 387W: Special Topics:Anthropology

Seminar or lecture series of topics of anthropological concern.May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ANT 390: Special Topics Taken Abroad

Includes courses taken abroad that can count towards Anthropology credit at Emory. For detailed instructions on receiving approval, visit OISP's website at http://college.emory.edu/oisp/programs/. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ANT 390W: Special Topics Taken Abroad

Includes courses taken abroad that can count towards Anthropology credit at Emory. For detailed instructions on receiving approval, visit OISP's website at http://college.emory.edu/oisp/programs/. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ANT 391: Law, Discipline, and Justice

This course examines the social and cultural-political dimensions of law, discipline, and disorder in a wide variety of human societies, providing cross-cultural perspectives on how people manage conflict, construe justice, and organize and experience power, discipline, and resistance. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 391W: Law, Discipline, and Justice

This course examines the social and cultural-political dimensions of law, discipline, and disorder in a wide variety of human societies, providing cross-cultural perspectives on how people manage conflict, construe justice, and organize and experience power, discipline, and resistance. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 397R: Directed Readings

Consultation with faculty prior to registration required. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ANT 415: Meth In Biolog Anthropology

Hypothesis testing and the statistical analysis of data. Theoretical and methodological problems in biological anthropology. The study of human and nonhuman primate skeletal biology, human growth and development, and the observation of nonhuman primates. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 431: Many Diseases, Few Causes

A new science of health is emerging. The evolutionary background for generic processes will be discussed and the challenges posed by modern lifestyles will be the focus of this class. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ANT 231/HLTH 210+BIOL 141/142.

ANT 445: Meth In Cultural Anthropology

Design of research strategies for the study of human cultures. Data collection techniques including participant observation, interviewing, genealogies, hypothesis testing, and the qualitative and quantitative analysis of data. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 450: The Evolution of Childhood

Covers the evolutionary and anatomical foundations of psychological, especially social and emotional, development, as well as comparative socialization and cross-cultural varieties of enculturation. Among the topics covered will be relevant parts of: life history theory and cultural evolution. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 450W: The Evolution of Childhood

Covers the evolutionary and anatomical foundations of psychological, especially social and emotional, development, as well as comparative socialization and cross-cultural varieties of enculturation. Among the topics covered will be relevant parts of: life history theory and cultural evolution. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

ANT 495A: Honors Research I

Departmental invitation to Honors Program necessary before registration. Credit Hours: 3.

ANT 495BW: Honors Research II

Departmental invitation to Honors Program necessary before registration. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ANT 497R: Undergraduate Research

Consultation with faculty prior to registration required. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ANT 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Anthropology (ANT). Credit Hours: 1-99.

Arabic

ARAB 101: Elementary Arabic I

First in a series of courses that develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. Course includes video materials and stresses communication in formal and spoken Arabic. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

ARAB 102: Elementary Arabic II

Prerequisites: Arabic 101 or permission of instructor. Second in a series of courses that develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. Course includes video materials and stresses communication in formal and spoken Arabic. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

ARAB 201: Intermediate Arabic I

Prerequisites: Arabic 102 or permission of instructor. Third in a series of courses that develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. Course includes video materials and stresses communication in formal and spoken Arabic. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

ARAB 202: Intermediate Arabic II

Prerequisites: Arabic 201 or permission of instructor. Fourth in a series of courses that develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. Course includes video materials and stresses communication in formal and spoken Arabic. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

ARAB 301: Advanced Arabic I

Prerequisites: Arabic 202 or permission of instructor. Fifth in a series of courses that develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. Course includes video materials and stresses communication in formal and spoken Arabic. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

ARAB 302: Advanced Arabic II

Sixth in a series of courses that develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. Course includes video materials and stresses communication in formal and spoken Arabic. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

ARAB 302W: Advanced Arabic II

Sixth in a series of courses that develop reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. Course includes video materials and stresses communication in formal and spoken Arabic. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

ARAB 401: Advanced - Plus Arabic

This course combines advanced textbook-based instruction with various genres of Arabic literature. Students will practice the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing, with particular emphasis on written expression. All class activities will be conducted in Arabic. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

ARAB 401W: Advanced - Plus Arabic

This course combines advanced textbook-based instruction with various genres of Arabic literature. Students will practice the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing, with particular emphasis on written expression. All class activities will be conducted in Arabic. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

ARAB 402: Advanced - Plus Arabic II

Introduction to Arabic literary genres from classical and modern periods. Topics include history, sociology, politics, travel, biography, poetry, literature, philosophy, newspapers, scholarly journals, biography of the Prophet Muhammad (Sira), and Qur'anic exegesis (Tafsir). General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

ARAB 402W: Advanced-Plus Arabic II

Introduction to Arabic literary genres from classical and modern periods. Topics include history, sociology, politics, travel, biography, poetry, literature, philosophy, newspapers, scholarly journals, biography of the Prophet Muhammad (Sira), and Qur'anic exegesis (Tafsir). General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

ARAB 410R: Advanced Language and Culture

Study and discussion of written and audio visual texts dealing with various aspects of Arab culture and society. Texts vary according to interests of students; may be repeated for credit. Credit Hours: 3.

ARAB 425R: Arabic Dialectology

Arabic dialects have been spoken continuously from Mauritania in the west to Iraq in the east. This course combines a broad introduction to the field with concrete experience working with Arabic dialects, exploring the historical development of the dialects and their relationship to Literary Arabic. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ARAB 497R: Supervised Reading In Arabic

Prerequisite: Arabic 302 or equivalent and approval of MESAS curriculum committee. For advanced students who wish to pursue independent study and research of Arabic texts. Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARAB 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent teansfer course in Arab. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Arch

ARCH 1: ARCHE - Atlanta University

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 10: ARCHE - Clark Atlanta Univ

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 11: ARCHE - Kennesaw State

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 12: ARCHE - ITC

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 13: ARCHE - Spelman

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 14: ARCHE - Clayton State

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 15: ARCHE - Brenau University

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 16: ARCHE - Mercer University

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 17: ARCHE-Savannah Coll Art/Design

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 18: ARCHE - Univ of West Georgia

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 19: ARCHE - Morehouse Sch of Med

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 2: ARCHE - Columbia Seminary

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 20: ARCHE-Georgia Gwinnett College

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 21: ARCHE - Mercer University

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 3: ARCHE - GA State

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 4: ARCHE - Atlanta College of Art

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 5: ARCHE - Agnes Scott

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 6: ARCHE - GA Institute of Tech

Credit Hours: -12.

ARCH 7: ARCHE - Univ Of Georgia

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 8: ARCHE - Morehouse

Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARCH 9: ARCHE - Oglethorpe

Credit Hours: 1-12.

Art History

ARTHIST 101: Art Culture Context I

Introduction to fundamental concepts of art history through 101 representative works of art and architecture produced in Egypt, the Near East, Europe, the Americas, and the Islamic world before 1600. Focus on the formal structure and historical contexts in which the works were made and understood. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 102: Art Culture Context II

Introduction to the fundamental concepts of art history through 102 representative works of art and architecture produced in Europe, Africa, and the U.S. between 1600 and the present day. Focus on the works' formal structure as well as the historical contexts in which they were made and understood. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 103: Understanding Architecture

An introduction to architecture considering the built environment we experience daily as well as historical buildings and practices. We will study architecture as a process of design, negotiation, construction, and reception and explore critical and social issues of representation and meaning. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 104: Great Buildings

Great buildings stand as icons to their cultures: the pyramids, Parthenon, St. Peter's, Center Pompidou. In this course, we explore these and other monuments asking why and how they have driven the development of western architecture from antiquity to contemporary America. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 190: Freshman Seminar:Art History

Limited to freshmen and introductory in nature, these seminars may feature discussion, readings, museum visits, and presentations. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 210: Introduction to Graphics & CAD

An introduction to drafting, modeling, rendering and animation in which students explore the potential of the computer as an active analytical and design instrument. We take a hands-on approach, focusing on two projects selected according to students' own disciplinary interests. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 212: Intro.to Digital Art History

This course introduces students to digital humanities as a way of approaching art history and architecture. DH methods enable new ways of engaging with historical and cultural materials. Students will learn about these techniques by working with digital tools and exploring existing digital projects. Credit Hours: 2.

ARTHIST 213: Anc't Egypt Art 3000 - 1550,BC

An introduction to the art of ancient Egypt from the late Predynastic Period through the Old and Middle Kingdoms to the end of the Second Intermediate Period. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 214: Anc Egyptian Art 1550 - 30 BC

An introduction to the art of ancient Egypt from the beginning of the New Kingdom to the conquest of Egypt by Rome. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 216: East Asian Calligraphy

Studies East Asian calligraphy in artistic, cultural, and historical contexts, starting with the immediate aspects of calligraphy as a traditional art form, and then reaching beyond the classically defined discipline to examine its aesthetic values, intellectual metaphors, and moral criteria. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 216W: East Asian Calligraphy

Studies East Asian calligraphy in artistic, cultural, and historical contexts, starting with the immediate aspects of calligraphy as a traditional art form, and then reaching beyond the classically defined discipline to examine its aesthetic values, intellectual metaphors, and moral criteria. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 220: Bronze Age Greece

The material culture of the Greek Bronze Age architecture. ceramic, glyptic, sculpture, and metalwork; an investigation of the human activities surrounding these artifacts, the cultural systems in which they operated, the conditions and methods of production use and exchange. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 221: Art&Architecture of Anc.Greece

An investigation of ancient Greek art and architecture from its Iron Age beginnings through the legacy of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the creation of monumental stone sculpture and ordered buildings, visual interpretation of Greek mythology, and the interaction of art, ritual and politics. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 222: Art & Architec of Ancient Rome

The Roman genius for cultural assimilation and innovative techniques transformed the art of the ancient Mediterranean. The course investigates major achievements in sculpture, painting, and architecture and their resonances with Roman politics, society, and religion. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 225: Anc't Mesoamerican Art/Arch

Introduction to the art and architecture of ancient Mesoamerica (lower Mexico and upper Central America), particularly the Olmec, Maya, and Aztec cultures. Includes artworks in jade, ceramic, stone, obsidian, and bone from the Carlos Museum. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 226: Anc't South & Central Amer Art

Introduction to the art and architecture of ancient Central and South America (Northern and Central Andes) with emphasis on Costa Rica and Peru. Art of various media in the Carlos Museum collection will be featured. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 231: Early Medieval Art, 200-900

Explores of the world of late antiquity including the Roman mystery cults, arts of the Jews and early Christians. From these diverse beginnings, we will examine the rise of major new cultural centers in Ravenna, Byzantium, the British Isles, and Damascus. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 232: Monastery&Cathedral,900-1300

Arts of the Romanesque and Gothic period, including architecture, sculpture, stained glass, and manuscript illumination. Major topics include the revival of monumental sculpture, the cult of relics, the rise of urban centers, and the development of a stone-vaulted architecture. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 233: Introducing Medieval Buildings

Medieval architecture revolutionized the building techniques and aesthetic principles employed in the ancient world. These spaces served new practices, worshipers and pilgrims. This course examines how and why these soaring cathedrals, Byzantine churches and Islamic mosques came about. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 241: Northern Renaissance Art

Innovations in painting and sculpture of Germany and the Low Countries between 1400 and 1600; emphasis on methods of verisimilar imitation, on art as an instrument of soul formation, on the rise of new pictorial genres. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 242: Italian Renaissance Art/Arch.

An introduction to the art and architecture of Italy from the late thirteenth century to the middle of the sixteenth, featuring such artists as Giotto, Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo, and Titian. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 244: Art in Renaissance Europe

An introduction to the masters who transformed the visual arts in Europe between 1400 and 1600, from the age of Jan van Eyck to that of Michelangelo and his followers. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 251: Arch/City Plan Europe

Architectural styles and urban design in such centers as Rome, Venice, Turin, Paris, Versailles, London, Bath, Dublin, Vienna, Berlin, and Leningrad. Architects include Bramante, Sansovino, Palladio, Michelangelo, Bernini, Boromini, Cortona, Longhena, Mansart, Wren, von Erlach, Neumann, and Gabriel. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 252: European Painting, 1590-1789

Painting in Italy, Spain, France, Flanders, Holland, and England to the time of the French Revolution. Emphasis on the production of such artists as Caravaggio, Rubens, Poussin, El Greco, Velasquez, Hals, Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Vermeer, Watteau, Fragonard, Boucher, and Greuze. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 259R: Hist Perspect./Euro Art Topics

The cultural context of selected traditions of European art and architecture, from ancient Mediterranean to eighteenth century, exploring the interplay of culture with historical circumstances. May be repeated when topic changes. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ARTHIST 259RW: Hist Perspect./Euro Art Topics

The cultural context of selected traditions of European art and architecture, from ancient Mediterranean to eighteenth century, exploring the interplay of culture with historical circumstances. May be repeated when topic changes. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ARTHIST 261: Eur in the Age of Revolution

An introductory survey of European art and architecture (with some consideration of the decorative arts) from the Louis XV period through the age of revolution. Concentration on neoclassicism and romanticism in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, and Spain. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 262: Eur in the Late 19th Century

Focused survey of European art from around 1851 to 1900, including works by the Realists, Impressionists, Post-Impressionists, and Symbolists. Integrates art with the political, philosophical, and cultural currents of the time and examines the evolution of modernism. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 265: Europe in the 20th Century

Focused survey of modern art in Europe with an emphasis on aesthetic, social, and historical dimensions of modernist practices. Movements include Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Dada, Constructivism, and Surrealism. Writings by artists and critics will be considered in relation to the art. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 265W: Europe in the 20th Century

Focused survey of modern art in Europe with an emphasis on aesthetic, social, and historical dimensions of modernist practices. Movements include Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Dada, Constructivism, and Surrealism. Writings by artists and critics will be considered in relation to the art. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 266: Contemp Europe and America

Focused survey of avant-garde developments in the visual arts from 1945 to the present, ranging from painting and sculpture to performance and installation. Emphasis will be placed on the critical concepts and the aesthetic, social, and historical implications of these cultural activities. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 271: Amer Art/Arch Before Civ War

American painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Colonial, Federal and early Victorian periods. Topics include the work of John Singleton Copley, Gilbert Stuart, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Latrobe, A. J. Downing, William Sidney Mount, and Winslow Homer. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 272: Century After the Civil War

American painting, sculpture, and architecture of the later Victorian and modern periods. Topics include the work of John Singer Sargent, J. A. M. Whistler, Thomas Eakins, H. H. Richardson, Louis Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Georgia O'Keeffe. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 273: Survey of American Painting

A survey of U.S. painting and its context from the colonial period to within two decades of the present. Artists considered include Copley, Peale, Church, Eakins, Whistler, Ryder, O'Keeffe, Hopper, Pollock, Rauschenberg, Rothko, and others. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 275: Mod Architecture: 1880 - 1945

An introduction to the history and interpretation of major developments in architectural theory and practice in Europe and the United States from the late nineteenth century to World War II. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 276: Contemporary Architecture

Introduces students to the ideas and forms of the built environment from WWII to the present, investigating how buildings and urban spaces of the late 20th?? early 21st century were conceived and realized to affect local, and increasingly global, debates about the role of spatial design in society. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 279: Intro.to African American Art

The purpose of this course is to examine African American art and some of the historical and cultural considerations that affected the nature of its developments. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 282: Intro.to African Art & Museums

This course focuses on arts linked to the African continent as well as operations of museums. It examines how objects enter museum collections and what information accompanies objects when they arrive at museums. The course does not require previous study of Africa, African arts, or museums. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 289: Perspect Non-West Art Topics

Focuses on one of several diverse, non-European art historical traditions, such as ancient Egypt, pre-Hispanic Americas, medieval Islam, Oceania, and sub-Saharan Africa. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ARTHIST 289W: Perspect Non-West Art Topics

Focuses on one of several diverse, non-European art historical traditions, such as ancient Egypt, pre-Hispanic Americas, medieval Islam, Oceania, and sub-Saharan Africa. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ARTHIST 290R: Sem:Art&Arch America/Europe

Monuments and art collections studied in important cities such as Amsterdam, London, Munich, New York, Paris, Rome, and Venice. Details can be obtained from the art history department. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 319R: Spec Stud:Ancient Egyptian Art

Topics could include the treasures of Tutankhamun; images of women in Egyptian art; and the art of New Kingdom Egypt. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 329: Topics: Art of Class Antiquity

Topics could include ancient sanctuaries; early Greece: real and imagined and religious festivals; myth and art in ancient Greece; and Greek architecture. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ARTHIST 329W: Topics: Art of Class Antiquity

Topics could include ancient sanctuaries; early Greece: real and imagined and religious festivals; myth and art in ancient Greece; and Greek architecture. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ARTHIST 335: Spec Stud:Ancient Amer Art His

Topics include textiles of the Americas; sculpture and museology; Aztec and Inka art; art and shamanism. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 339R: Spec Stud:Medieval Art History

Topics include: Medieval Monumental Stained Glass, Hagiography,and Manuscript Illumination. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 340: Gothic Art and Architecture

The cathedral is a symbol of the Heavenly Jerusalem, masterpiece of structural engineering, reflection of Scholastic ideals, visual Bible for the illiterate, and house of worship. This course will explore all these aspects in the earliest French monuments that gave birth to Gothic architecture. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 345: The Formation of Islamic Art

An introduction to the early formative period of Islamic art in the sixth through the thirteenth centuries, drawing upon architecture, ceramics, textiles, metalwork, and manuscript illumination. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 349R: Spec Stud:Renaissance Art Hist

Topics in Italian or Northern art, ranging from Giotto to Pieter Bruegel. From artistic centers such as Florence, Rome, and Venice, to Bruges, Antwerp, and Haarlem. May be repeated for credit when topic changes up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 349RW: Spec Stud:Renaissance Art Hist

Topics in Italian or Northern art, ranging from Giotto to Pieter Bruegel. From artistic centers such as Florence, Rome, and Venice, to Bruges, Antwerp, and Haarlem. May be repeated for credit when topic changes up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 355: Historical Arts of Africa

Traditional genres of African art with a focus on masks and figure sculpture in West and Central African city-states and chiefdoms from 1500 to European colonization. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 359R: Spec Stud:17th/18th Cent Art

Topics could include problems in the study of Rubens; poetics and painting; the Carraci reform of art and its consequences; and problems in the study of Rembrandt. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 363: Lit & Visual Culture in Japan

An exploration of the complex interactions between written texts and the visual arts in Japan from the classical era to the present. Discussion will include prose, poetry, printing, picture scrolls, calligraphy, woodblock prints, and film. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 363W: Lit & Visual Culture in Japan

An exploration of the complex interactions between written texts and the visual arts in Japan from the classical era to the present. Discussion will include prose, poetry, printing, picture scrolls, calligraphy, woodblock prints, and film. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 365: Postcolonial African Art

Treatment of the major issues raised by the new genres of art that have resulted from the African experience of European colonization. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 367: 20th C African American Art

Developments in African American art in the United States in the twentieth century considering the key artists/movement/moments and larger themes in African American society and culture. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 369R: Spec Stud:19th/20th Cent Art

Possible topics include Post-Impressionism and its consequences; Matisse & Picasso; Art and Politics between the Wars; Dada and Surrealism; the Avant-Garde; Abstract Art; What is Art?; Theories of Modernism. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 369RW: Spec Stud:19th/20th Cent Art

Possible topics include Post-Impressionism and its consequences; Matisse & Picasso; Art and Politics between the Wars; Dada and Surrealism; the Avant-Garde; Abstract Art; What is Art?; Theories of Modernism. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 373: The Russian Avantgarde

Knowledge of Russian is not required. Introduction to interdisciplinary study of 20th-century Russian literature and the visual arts, with focus on issues of art and politics, time, space and identity in symbolist, supermatist, constructivist, socialist realist and post-Soviet "vision". In English. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 375: American Art: Civil War Era

This course focuses on American art created in the decades surrounding the Civil War (1861??65), exploring the ways American artists responded to that turbulent era through paintings, sculpture, photography, and popular prints. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 375W: American Art: Civil War Era

This course focuses on American art created in the decades surrounding the Civil War (1861??65), exploring the ways American artists responded to that turbulent era through paintings, sculpture, photography, and popular prints. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 379R: Spec.Studies American Art

Topics could include romanticism in England and the United States, issues in American painting; African diaspora ritual arts; and African American painting and sculpture. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 385: Special Topics

Special topics in Art History. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-3.

ARTHIST 385W: Special Topics

Special topics in Art History. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ARTHIST 387: Issues in Art Conservation

Students will explore the principle issues surrounding the care and preservation of art and cultural property, considering materials, deterioration, object history, and treatment. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 388: Technical Art History

Through technical investigation of museum objects, students will explore material choice, working process, authenticity, provenance, and restoration history. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 389R: Spec Studi African Art Arch

Topics could include African art and architecture; colonial and contemporary African art; and arts of ancient Africa. May be repeated for credit when topic changes, up to a maximum of twelve hours. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 393R: Special Studies History of Art

Advanced seminars dealing with various specialized problems in the history of art from antiquity to modern times, such as individual artists, genres (e.g. portraiture, landscape); themes (e.g. theory, iconography); artistic movements and museum studies. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 397R: Internship In History of Art

Supervised participation in museum, gallery, or other art-related activity. Requires approval by the ARTHIST Internship Coordinator. May be repeated, with permission, for up to 12 credit hours. Credit ranges from one (for 50 hrs., or 4 hrs./week) to four (200 hrs., or 14 hrs./week). Credit Hours: 1-4.

ARTHIST 398R: Supervised Reading & Research

Reading and research projects decided upon between the student and a member of the faculty, with final approval from the chair. May be repeated for credit. Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARTHIST 470R: Sem:Ancient Mediterr/Anatolian

Advanced seminar with emphasis on critical texts, methods, and techniques of art historical investigation. For art history majors; open to others with permission from the instructor. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 470RW: Sem:Ancient Mediterr/Anatolian

Advanced seminar with emphasis on critical texts, methods, and techniques of art historical investigation. For art history majors; open to others with permission from the instructor. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 475R: Sem:Med/Euro/Renais/Baroque

Advanced seminar with emphasis on critical texts, methods, and techniques of art historical investigation. For art history majors; open to others with permission from the instructor. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 475RW: Sem:Med/Euro/Renais/Baroque

Advanced seminar with emphasis on critical texts, methods, and techniques of art historical investigation. For art history majors; open to others with permission from the instructor. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 480R: Sem:Late18th Cont Eur&Am Art

Advanced seminar with emphasis on critical texts, methods, and techniques of art historical investigation. Permission from instructor required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 480RW: Sem:Late18th Cont Eur&Am Art

Advanced seminar with emphasis on critical texts, methods, and techniques of art historical investigation. Permission from instructor required. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 485R: Sem:Art-Anc Amer/Afr/Afr Diasp

Advanced seminar with emphasis on critical texts, methods, and techniques of art historical investigation. For art history majors; open to others with permission from the instructor. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTHIST 485RW: Sem:Art-Anc Amer/Afr/Afr Diasp

Advanced seminar with emphasis on critical texts, methods, and techniques of art historical investigation. For art history majors; open to others with permission from the instructor. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 495R: Honors

Open to candidates for honors in the senior year who are writing an honors thesis. For requirements and permission, consult the departmental honors coordinator. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTHIST 495RW: Honors

Open to candidates for honors in the senior year who are writing an honors thesis. For requirements and permission, consult the departmental honors coordinator. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ARTHIST 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Art History. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Visual Arts

ARTVIS 103: Intro Drawing & Printmaking

This course uses the tools/concepts of drawing and printmaking to develop skills in representation and observation. Students will acquire skills with the fundamental of visual observation, and the extrapolation to visual problem solving. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTVIS 105: Intro Painting

Offered in rotation. Credit, four hours. This course uses the tools and concepts of painting to develop skills in visual thinking. The fundamentals of visual observation and articulation are developed through visual problem solving. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTVIS 107: Intro to Digital Video

Creative as well as technical problems in these related media are examined; techniques in using cameras, projectors, and video editing equipment. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTVIS 108: Ceramics I

This course is designed to introduce students to the discipline of hand building in Ceramics. Students will learn the technical processes involved in forming and firing centered on fundamental sculptural concerns. Basic glaze and clay chemistry will also be covered. These techniques will be explored in the context of history of ceramic art history and in its contemporary concerns and theory. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTVIS 109: Intro Sculpture

Offered in rotation. Credit, four hours. A course designed to provide a firm grounding in the rudiments of sculptural practice. Students are exposed to an overview of processes, tools, and materials used in sculpture. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTVIS 111: Foundations in Art Practices

This course explores historical media and art practices from Prehistory to the Renaissance. Students will study materials, techniques and practices of drawing, painting, print making, sculpture and architecture. Specific projects will be supplemented by readings, presentations and discussion. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTVIS 112: Foundations in Art PracticesII

This foundation-level course exposes students to historical media and practices that undergird the creation of art objects. Designed as a studio course to complement ARTHIST 102. Strategies and materials of art-making from the late Renaissance through the present day will be explored. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTVIS 180: Special Topics Study Abroad

Monuments and art collections studied in important cities such as Amsterdam, London, Munich, New York, Paris, Rome, and Venice. Details can be obtained from the Art History Department. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ARTVIS 180W: Special Topics Study Abroad

Monuments and art collections studied in important cities such as Amsterdam, London, Munich, New York, Paris, Rome, and Venice. Details can be obtained from the Art History Department. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ARTVIS 203: Intermed Drawing/Printmaking

This course builds on the tools and concepts of drawing and printmaking and expands skills in observation and imagination. This course incorporates intermediate levels of conceptual and aesthetic awareness. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTVIS 204: Introduction to Media Studies

Examines mass media (photography, film, music, news reporting, radio, TV, video games) through a variety of approaches in the humanities and social sciences. This course is required for the minor in Media Studies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTVIS 205: Intermediate Painting

This course builds on the tools and concepts of painting. This course incorporates intermediate levels of conceptual and aesthetic awareness, creative problem solving, aesthetics and critical thinking with an emphasis on the 20th and 21st century aesthetic practices. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ARTVIS 105/104 as PreReq.

ARTVIS 208R: Ceramics II

This course will include experimentation and creative problem solving within the field of hand-built ceramics. Students will learn intermediate technical processes in forming, firing and glazing. Ongoing research into ceramic art history, and its contemporary context is an important part of the course. Rotating sub-themes allow this course to be repeated for credit. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ARTVIS 108 as PreReq.

ARTVIS 209: Intermediate Sculpture

Contemporary sculptural practice is emphasized in both practical and theoretical terms. Students will continue to investigate the relationship of ideas to materials and construction techniques. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ARTVIS 109 as PreReq.

ARTVIS 210: Contemp Art Issues Workshop

The emphasis in this course is on the exploration of contemporary issues in the twenty-first century. The axis being the artist as they view art making and art theory practices. Visiting artists, art critics, curators, and site visits are integral to this course. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ARTVIS 205/206/208/209 as PreR.

ARTVIS 215: Chn.ArtCultSoc thr Calligraphy

This course introduces students to Chinese calligraphy in its artistic, cultural and historical contexts. Combining systematic hands-on practice with reading, writing, and research, it engages students in examining the aesthetic values, intellectual metaphors, and moral criteria that calligraphy embodies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTVIS 290: Special Topics Study Abroad

Monuments and art collections studied in important cities such as Amsterdam, London, Munich, New York, Paris, Rome, and Venice. Details can be obtained from the Art History Department. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ARTVIS 290W: Special Topics Study Abroad

Monuments and art collections studied in important cities such as Amsterdam, London, Munich, New York, Paris, Rome, and Venice. Details can be obtained from the Art History Department. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ARTVIS 303: Drawing & Painting Tutorial

This advanced tutorial uses the tools and concepts of drawing and painting to develop skills in research and project development as well as advanced skills in drawing, painting and mixed media. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTVIS 305: Painting Tutorial

This advanced tutorial uses the tools and concepts of drawing and painting to develop skills in research and project development. Written documentation, oral presentations, critique skills and studio skills that support independent research are developed. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ARTVIS 205 as PreReq.

ARTVIS 308R: Ceramics III

Offered once a year. In this advanced course, students will continue to develop their skills, ideas and techniques in ceramic hand-building. Emphasis is placed on in-depth study and development of an independent body of work within the context of the contemporary ceramics field. Rotating sub-themes allow this course to be repeated for credit. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ARTVIS 208 as PreReq.

ARTVIS 309: Sculpture Tutorial

This course focuses on individual student inquiry into advanced sculptural practices utilizing the concepts, histories, practices, and potentialities of the field. Advanced level allows students to assume a greater role in defining the parameters of projects. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ARTVIS 209 as PreReq.

ARTVIS 311: Advanced Painting

This course explores advanced concepts in painting including new materials, mixed media, and contemporary approaches to space, scale, and installation. Exploration of diverse materials and techniques will be supported by theoretical examination and independent research projects. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTVIS 313: Advanced Printmaking

This advanced course explores the history, processes, and theories of printmaking. Creative problem-solving supplemented by theoretical examination, written documentation, oral presentation, critical writing skills, and supporting independent research is required. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTVIS 315: Advanced Video

Students will learn advanced video production techniques and strategies. Additional attention placed on theoretical and conceptual components of video as well as technical. Students will be required to attend screenings and are expected to produce a professional quality, short video. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTVIS 333R: Multidiscipline Design Studio

This course is a multi-disciplinary course that will teach students how to write an art proposal, how to gather field research, and how to talk with experts about important topics. This research will be woven into the process of creating visual models, designs, and drawings. Credit Hours: 3.

ARTVIS 390: Special Topics Study Abroad

Monuments and art collections studied in important cities such as Amsterdam, London, Munich, New York, Paris, Rome, and Venice. Details can be obtained from the Art History Department. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ARTVIS 390W: Special Topics Study Abroad

Monuments and art collections studied in important cities such as Amsterdam, London, Munich, New York, Paris, Rome, and Venice. Details can be obtained from the Art History Department. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ARTVIS 398R: Directed Study

This course may be repeated for up to 12 credit hours. This individually focused research is only available to advanced students with special projects. Permission of a sponsoring faculty member is required. Topics covered in the regular curriculum cannot be covered under directed study. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ARTVIS 405R: Experimntl/Avant-Garde Cinema

An historical/theoretical survey of the experimental avantgarde as an alternative to mainstream narrative, with an emphasis on its wide variety of forms. May include a filmmaking component. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTVIS 490: Senior Seminar

Offered once a year during the fall semester. This capstone course is required of all graduating IVAC co-majors and focuses on professional practices including documentation, research, development of an individual body of work situated in contemporary theory and methodology. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTVIS 495R: Honors

Open to candidates for honors in the senior year who are writing an honors thesis. Candidates are required to have a Three Person Faculty advising committee. For additional requirements and permission, consult the departmental honors coordinator. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ARTVIS 495RW: Honors

Open to candidates for honors in the senior year who are writing an honors thesis. Candidates are required to have a Three Person Faculty advising committee. For additional requirements and permission, consult the departmental honors coordinator. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ARTVIS 496R: Internship in the Visual Arts

Supervised participation in museum, gallery, or other art-related activity. Requires approval by the ARTHIST Internship Coordinator. May be repeated, with permission, for up to 12 credit hours. Credit ranges from one (for 50 hrs., or 4 hrs./week) to four (200 hrs., or 14 hrs./week). Credit Hours: 1-12.

ARTVIS 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Visual Arts. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Asia

ASIA 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Asia. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Biology

BIOL 120: Concepts In Biology W/Lab

Principles of genetics, physiology, ecology, taxonomy, and evolution with special reference to contemporary life situations. Intended for non-science majors. This course does not fulfill requirements for medical and dental schools or for a biology major. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 4.

BIOL 141: Foundations of Modern Biol I

Major topics include: biomolecules, cell structure and function, energy metabolism, and cell reproduction. Fulfills biology major and pre-health requirements. Note: students receiving credit for Biol 141 must still take Biol 141L. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

BIOL 141L: Found. of Modern Biol I Lab

Introduces students to scientific inquiry in the laboratory. Students design, implement, analyze and present authentic research projects. Along with Biology 141, 142 and 142L, meets the requirement for medical and dental school and the biology major. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: BIOL 141 coreq./CHEM 141 prere.

BIOL 142: Foundations of Modern Biol II

Major topics include: molecular genetics, population genetics, genomics, evolution, gene expression regulation, signal transduction, cancer and development. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 141/141L as Pre/Co-req.

BIOL 142L: Found. of Modern Biol II Lab

Students experience scientific inquiry in the laboratory. Students design, implement, analyze and present authentic research projects. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: BIOL 142 as a corequisite.

BIOL 151: Intro Expermntl Biol I W/ Lab

Biology 151 and 152 are a research-based, lab-focused sequence for the incoming student especially experienced and interested in basic research and in science in societal context. Credit Hours: 4.

BIOL 152: Intro Expermntl Biol II W/ Lab

Permission of instructor. Focuses on organismal physiology and development, behavior, and ecology. Advanced readings, inquiry-based labs, and discussion of current research will challenge the advanced student. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: Biol 151 as Prerequisite.

BIOL 160: Biology for the People

For non-majors, this course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an understanding of those elements of the biological and biomedical sciences, ecology, evolutionary biology, and applied statistics that are of direct importance to their lives as individuals and as citizens. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

BIOL 185: Special Topics in Biology

A course on topics of special biological interest, designed for non-majors. This course is repeatable when the topic varies. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 1-4.

BIOL 185W: Special Topics in Biology

A course on topics of special biological interest, designed for non-majors. This course is repeatable when the topic varies. General Education Requirement: SNTW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

BIOL 190: Freshman Seminar:Biology

Freshmen only. Variable topics. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

BIOL 200: Intro to Bio Research

This course will prepare students for a future laboratory or field research experience. Students will be introduced to the scientific research process. Emphasis will be on the use of scientific literature, planning a research project, preparing a proposal, and scientific writing/rewriting. Credit Hours: 2.

BIOL 205: Compar Vertebrate Anat W/Lab

Comparative studies of phylogeny and anatomy of vertebrates from both an evolutionary and functional perspective. Cat and shark dissected in laboratory. Credit Hours: 5. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 206: Biology of Parasites W/Lab

Protozoan, helminthic, and arthropod parasites of medical significance. Topics addressed include basic principles of parasitology, evolutionary trends, host-parasite ecological considerations, therapeutic measures, and control programs. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 210: Plant Biology with Lab

Topics will include plant structure, function, growth, development, physiology, and systematics. Evolutionary relationships within the plant kingdom will also be emphasized. For science majors. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 212: Comp.Model.Scient.& Engineers

Computation is one of the pillars of modern science, in addition to experiment and theory. In this course, various computational modeling methods will be introduced to study specific examples derived from physical, biological, chemical and social systems. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 4.

BIOL 223: Developmental Biology

How does a single cell embryo develop into a fully functional adult organism? We will examine the basic principles underlying development at the cellular, molecular, and organismal levels. Topics covered will include body plan development, examples of organogenesis and cell differentiation. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 224: Experimental Dev. Biology

How does an organism go from a single cell to a fully patterned embryo and how does a tissue regenerate after damage? This course will use a combination of and lecture and lab work to examine fundamental mechanisms and principles that govern early embryonic development and tissue regeneration. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142 as prerequisite.

BIOL 240: Organismal Form and Function

Major topics include the biology of animals and plants, physiology, evolution, and ecology. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 141 as Prerequisite.

BIOL 241: Evolutionary Biology

A study of the factors that cause genetic change and of the evolutionary consequences of such changes. Topics include population genetics, adaptation and natural selection, evolution of genes, proteins and genomes, sexual selection, kin selection, speciation, and diversification of taxa. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L PREREQ #788.

BIOL 247: Ecology

This course provides an overview of the principles of ecology and the study of relationships between organisms and their environment. Processes and properties of individuals, populations, communities, and ecosystems will be emphasized. Lectures will emphasize active and collaborative learning. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 247L: Ecology Laboratory

This is the laboratory portion of the Ecology class. Field studies will be conducted in various natural areas in Georgia, including a weekend trip to the mountains. Pre- or corequisite: Biology/ENVS 247. (This course meets the upper-level laboratory requirement for the biology major.). Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: BIOL142 & 247as a Prerequisite.

BIOL 247LW: Ecology Laboratory

This is the laboratory portion of the Ecology class. Field studies will be conducted in various natural areas in Georgia, including a weekend trip to the mountains. Pre- or corequisite: Biology/ENVS 247. (This course meets the upper-level laboratory requirement for the biology major and the WR GER.). General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL142 & 247as a Prerequisite.

BIOL 250: Cell Biology

We will explore cells at the molecular level. Major themes include membrane organization and transport, protein trafficking, cytoskeleton structure and cell motility, cell adhesion, cell signaling, and the cell cycle. Key medical issues associated with cellular dysfunction will be presented. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 260: Insect Biology

This course offers students hands-on experience to develop an understanding of insect biology. Through lectures, labs and fieldwork, students will develop the skills to distinguish the major groups of insects and to analyze the importance of insects for ecology and human food production and health. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/240 as PreReq.

BIOL 261: Biology of Insects

This course offers students hands-on experience to develop an understanding of insect biology. Through lectures, labs, and fieldwork, students will develop the skills to distinguish the major groups of insects and to analyze the importance of insects for ecology, human food production, and health. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142 or BIOL 240 as prereq.

BIOL 264: Genetics: A Human Perspective

This course provides a fundamental understanding of human genetics and builds on the concepts of genetics developed in Biology 142. Topics include modern analysis of the human genome, stem cell research, immunity and cancer. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 285: Special Topics in Biology

A course on topics of special biological interest, designed for Biology majors elective credit. This course is repeatable when the topic varies. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 285W: Special Topics in Biology

A course on topics of special biological interest, designed for Biology majors elective credit. This course is repeatable when the topic varies. General Education Requirement: SNTW. Credit Hours: 1-5. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 301: Biochemistry I

An integrated approach to the synthesis, structure, and function of macromolecular biomolecules, including proteins, carbohydrates, DNA, and RNA. First half of a two-semester biochemistry sequence. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L & CHEM 203/221.

BIOL 302: Biochemistry II

Prerequisites: Biology/Chemistry 301, Chemistry 222, Biology 141. Topics will include nitrogen and fatty acid metabolism, glycolysis, and respiration. The evolution of the pathways associated with these processes will be explored. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

BIOL 315: Ancient DNA & Human Evolution

The course focuses on the key methods adopted in the study of ancient DNA, such as next generation sequencing and population genetics, as well as a thematic approach to the major evolutionary questions. Topics include human migrations, archaic humans, domestication, and ancient pathogens. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

BIOL 320: Animal Behavior

Structure and function of animal behavior from a comparative, evolutionary perspective. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or BIOL_OX 142.

BIOL 325: Primate Social Psychology

Recent progress in the field of primate social behavior, particularly the role of cognition in complex social strategies. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: PYSC 110/BIOL 142.

BIOL 329: Coastal Biology with Lab

Emphasizes basic principles of coastal ecology, human impact on coastal ecosystems, and the diversity of organisms living in these ecosystems. The course involves an eight-day laboratory/field trip to St. Simons Island, Georgia and other Georgia Sea Islands over Spring Break. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 330: Chem Bio & Molecular Modeling

Examine the world including issues around natural and unnatural molecules, disease and society in the context of topics like drugs, molecules for Mars, aging, AIDS, bioterrorism, and crime in the courtroom using computer graphics, the molecular structure of small molecules and proteins, and energy. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 222/172 as Prereq.

BIOL 336: Human Physiology

A study of human physiology emphasizing integrated body functions. Topics include respiration, circulation, contractility, osmoregulation, endocrinology, and neurophysiology. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 345: Conservation Biology

This course focuses on the conservation of biodiversity and introduces students to ways that ecological and evolutionary principles can be used to conserve and protect species and ecosystems at risk. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131, BIOLOX111, BIOL 142.

BIOL 346L: Biomolecular Chemistry

Experiments involve analysis and characterization of the major classes of biological compounds. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: BIOL142/301,CHEM301 as prereq.

BIOL 347: Disease Ecology

Research on the ecology of infectious diseases has increased tremendously, fueled by challenges to global human health and ecological conservation as well as advances in theory and molecular technologies. This course introduces major issues and advances in the ecology of infectious diseases. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L and QTM 100.

BIOL 348: Mechanisms Of Animal Behavior

A survey of current topics in neural development and neural basis of behavior. Emphasis is on research work that uses a combination of physiological, genetic, cellular, and molecular techniques to understand neural systems and their evolution and development. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/CHEM 141 PreReq.

BIOL 349: Ecology of Invasions

This course will familiarize students with principles of ecological invasions and methods for assessing the spread and impacts of invasive species on a global scale. Students will also become familiar with major sources of exotic species introductions and methods available for prevention and control. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131, BIOLOX111, BIOL 142.

BIOL 352: Epigenetics & Human Disease

Epigenetics is the study of heritable characteristics not caused by changes in DNA sequence, but rather induced by non-genetic factors that alter gene expression and are dependent on time and location. The course explores epigenetics and its relation to normal development and disease. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142 & BIOL 264 as prereq..

BIOL 353: Genetics of Complex Traits

This course will study the fundamental principles and methodology of quantitative genetics and expose students to current primary literature on current genetic analyses of complex traits such as human diseases. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142 AND 241 as a prerequi.

BIOL 354: Origin & Evol of Immune System

This course will study the origins and evolution of the immune system from different fields such as immunology, molecular biology, and evolution. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 355: Intr. to Time Series Analysis

This course covers the fundamentals of time series analysis in both the natural and social sciences, utilizing analytical, statistical, and numerical approaches. We will focus on the application of these methods to complex, real world data from medicine, economics, geology, and other fields. Credit Hours: 3.

BIOL 360: Introduction To Neurobiology

Includes electrochemical and biophysical mechanisms for neuronal signaling, synaptic transmission, and neural bases of behavior and perception. GER Note: This course and BIOL360L satisfies half of SNTL requirement. This course w/o BIOL360L will award half of SNT only. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/CHEM 142 as prereq..

BIOL 360L: Neurobiology Simulation Lab

This course will explore topics in cellular and small network neuroscience by performing virtual electrophysiology experiments on the computer. The content matches the material covered in Biology 360/NBB 301 and will help students understand neurons and neuronal networks in greater depth. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: BIOL 142/360 as Prerequisite.

BIOL 361: Ecosystems Through Time

Introduction to paleoecology and paleoecological methods. Includes geological and paleontological evidence for marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems from past 600 million years; interpreting how ecosystems evolved; comparing ancient ecosystems with modern analogues. Fulfills ENVS Elective. Credit Hours: 3.

BIOL 365: Controversial Science

This course examines topics in science and technology that stir public controversy. Examples are human cloning, genetically modified organisms, nuclear power, human-caused global warming, evolution, etc. Topics are examined by exploring the arguments of stakeholders through group discussion. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 370: Introduction to Microbiology

Introduction to the concepts of microbial physiology, biochemistry, genetics, and evolution. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or BIOL_OX 142.

BIOL 370L: Intro to Microbiology Lab

Introduction to basic laboratory techniques in microbiology. Experiments dealing with the physiology, biochemistry, genetics, and molecular biology of microbes will be included. (This course meets the upper-level laboratory requirement and will count as elective credit for the Biology major.). Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: BIOL 142/370 as a Prerequisite.

BIOL 371: Ecology of the Tropics

Explores the diverse biomes of the tropics. Focus will be on tropical forests and grasslands, with an emphasis on ecological processes, biodiversity, human impact in the tropics, indigenous peoples, and ethnobotany. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: ENVS 131, BIOLOX111, BIOL 142.

BIOL 372: Ecology of the Tropics Field

Permission required. This is the field course to accompany the lecture course on tropical ecology. Field trip will take place during the spring recess. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: ENVS 371, BIOL 371.

BIOL 385: Special Topics in Biology

A course on topics of special biological interest, designed for Biology majors elective credit. This course is repeatable when the topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or BIOL_OX 142.

BIOL 385W: Special Topics in Biology

A course on topics of special biological interest, designed for Biology majors elective credit. This course is repeatable when the topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or BIOL_OX 142.

BIOL 386: Special Topics with Laboratory

Study of particular subjects pertaining to biology with laboratory or field experiences. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

BIOL 386W: Special Topics with Laboratory

Study of particular subjects pertaining to biology with laboratory or field experiences. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

BIOL 402: Neuroscience Live

Recent research publications by Emory neuroscientists will be read and discussed in preparation for talks by the authors in class. Writing assignments will accompany this work. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/360 as Prerequisite.

BIOL 402W: Neuroscience Live

Recent research publications by Emory neuroscientists will be read and discussed in preparation for talks by the authors in class. Writing assignments will accompany this work. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/360 as Prerequisite.

BIOL 415: Cancer Biology And Oncogenes

Prerequisites: Biology 142, Chemistry 221, and Math 111. The biological mechanisms regulating cell growth, differentiation, and migration will be examined through a focus on the mechanisms by which cancers grow and spread. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 430: Human Genome Project & Disease

Prerequisite: Biology 142. Course covers human genome projects. Geared toward developing independent thinking through solving human genetic problems and critically reviewing literature on human diseases. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 434: Physical Biology

The course explores physical and statistical constraints on strategies used by biological systems, from bacteria, to large organisms, and to entire populations, to sense external environmental signals, process them, and shape a response. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL/PHYS 212 & PHYS 220.

BIOL 440: Animal Communication

Functions, evolution, ecology, and significance of animal communication systems in a wide taxonomic range, from insects to primates. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 440W: Animal Communication

Functions, evolution, ecology, and significance of animal communication systems in a wide taxonomic range, from insects to primates. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 441: Molecular Biol & Evol Genetics

Course covers population genetics, molecular evolution, and genomics. Geared toward developing independent thinking by solving molecular biology and evolutionary genetics problems in natural populations. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 450: Computational Neuroscience

Intro to computational neuroscience with an emphasis on biophysical neuronal modeling of single neurons and small networks. Other topics include spike train analysis, dynamical systems analysis, and dimensionality reductions methods. Some Matlab and general programming skills are required. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL360/NBB301/IBS514.

BIOL 455: Immunology and Disease

The basic principles of immunology, the causes of pathogenesis during the course of infection with microparasites, and the limitations to the understanding of infectious diseases (such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria) caused by viruses, bacteria, and unicellular eukaryotes. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 460: Building Brains

Explores our current understanding of the mechanisms that regulate development of the nervous system. Topics covered include neurogenesis, axon guidance, programmed cell death, and synapse formation. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 463: Pop Biol & Evolutn Of Disease

Application of basic principles of population genetics and population biology to the study of infectious diseases, aging, and cancer. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 475: Biology Of The Eye

For juniors and seniors interested in a basic understanding of the eye. This course will review principles and state-of-the-art information on ocular anatomy, embryology, biochemistry, physiology, genetics, immunology, microbiology, pharmacology, and pathology. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 480: Modeling Biological Systems

Will cover the construction and analysis of mathematical models of cellular and population processes in biology. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 480L: Modeling Biological Syst - Lab

This laboratory course must be taken concurrently with the lecture course Biology 480. Credit Hours: 1. Requisites: BIOL 142 AND 480 as a Prerequi.

BIOL 485: Special Topics in Biology

A course on topics of special biological interest, designed for Biology majors elective credit. This course is repeatable when the topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or BIOL_OX 142.

BIOL 485W: Special Topics in Biology

A course on topics of special biological interest, designed for Biology majors elective credit. This course is repeatable when the topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or BIOL_OX 142.

BIOL 495A: Honors Research

Prerequisite: consent of departmental honors coordinator. Independent research for students invited to participate in the biology department Honors Program. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

BIOL 495BW: Honors Research

Prerequisite: consent of departmental honors coordinator. Final semester of independent research for students invited to participate in the biology department Honors Program. WR is satisfied by submission and acceptance of completed honors thesis based on this research. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: BIOL 142 and 495A as a Prerequ.

BIOL 497R: Supervised Reading

Credit, one to four hours per semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L as PreReq.

BIOL 499R: Undergraduate Research

For biology majors only. Permission required (see biology.emory.edu/research-opportunities). Must be taken for 4 credits/semester. Fulfills 4 elective credits (maximum) and upper-level lab requirement for Biology major only upon completion of two semesters. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or BIOL_OX 142.

BIOL 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Biology. Credit Hours: -99.

Community Building and Social Change

CBSC 370A: Community Bldg & Soc Change I

Open only to undergraduate students by permission of the instructor. Additionally, this course is required for all students seeking to apply for the fellowship in Community Building and Social Change. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CBSC 370B: Planning Community Initiatives

Open only to students admitted as fellows in the program in Community Building and Social Change. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

CBSC 370BW: Planning Community Initiatives

Open only to students admitted as fellows in the program in Community Building and Social Change. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 5.

CBSC 370L: Planning Comm.Initiatives-Lab

Open only to students admitted as fellows in the program in Community Building and Social Change. Credit Hours: 1.

CBSC 492R: Practicum:Comm Bldg & Soc Chng

Open only to students admitted as fellows in the program in Community Building and Social Change. Credit Hours: 2.

Chemistry

CHEM 105: How Things Work

No prerequisite courses. Topics such as lasers, CD recording, the pill, photocopying, jet engines, cocaine, genetic engineering, perfume, cooking/baking, and pheromones will be discussed. The goal is to impart an appreciation for various scientific and technical features of everyday life. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

CHEM 110: Concepts In Physics & Chem

General topics course covering material of societal interest to the general education community. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

CHEM 115: The Chemistry of Crime

Maymester Course. This course will first explore how chemicals can be used to deceive and destroy. Next, scientific techniques used by forensic chemists will be employed to evaluate and interpret evidence from a staged crime scene. New evidence will be presented each day as the mystery unfolds. Credit Hours: 4.

CHEM 125: Topics In Chemistry with Lab

This course will examine the science of chemistry using themes that delineate chemistry as a human activity. The broader impact that the practice of chemistry has on society will be emphasized using current, historical, and interdisciplinary topics. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CHEM 141: General Chemistry I W/Lab

Fall, summer. Laws and theories of chemistry; atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, properties of solutions; qualitative analysis. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 4.

CHEM 142: General Chemistry II W/Lab

Spring, summer. Kinetics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, and chemical properties of metals and nonmetals; quantitative analysis. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: Chem 141 as Prerequisite.

CHEM 150: Structure and Properties

This course will build a strong foundation in atomic and molecular structure. It starts with atomic structure and builds to ionic compounds and molecular structure, including stereochemistry and conformation. Students will interpret experimental data to explain structure, properties relationships. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

CHEM 150L: Structure and Properties Lab

CHEM 150L is the first lab for students taking Chemistry at Emory. The lab focuses on experimental practices including experimental design, accuracy and precision, data collection and analysis, and the use of evidence to make conclusions. Experiments will connect structure to properties of matter. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM 150 as co-requisite.

CHEM 190: Freshmen Seminar:Chemistry

Special topics freshman seminar. Variable content. Please contact the instructor of record for specifics. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

CHEM 202: Principles of Reactivity

CHEM 202 provides a basic understanding of the kinetics and thermodynamics associated with reactions, how these are related to the structures of reactants and products and the pathways between them, and how reactivity can be controlled through choices of reacting molecules and conditions. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 141 or 150 as prereq..

CHEM 202L: Principles of Reactivity Lab

CHEM 202L students will make qualitative determinations based on quantitative data. They will measure and analyze data including reaction rates, Rf values, etc. Lab will culminate in the development of the synthesis of an alcohol and the isolation of compounds, including a natural product. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM 150L prereq/CHEM 202 core.

CHEM 202Z: Principles of Reactivity

CHEM 202Z will provide students with a basic understanding of covalent bonding models, the energetics of reactions, and the kinetics and thermodynamics associated with reactions. The course will emphasize how reactivity is related to molecular structure and how reactivity can be controlled. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: AP score 4 or IB score 5.

CHEM 202ZL: Principles of Reactivity Lab

CHEM 202ZL students will use molecular modeling to build 3-D chemical structures. They will then prepare an ester derivative, perform a nucleophilic addition, and stusy elimination reactions. Products of these reactions will be analyzed using a variety of instruments (IR, NMR, HPLC, etc.). General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: AP score 4 or IB score 5.

CHEM 203: Advanced Reactivity

CHEM 203 will focus on the chemistry of organic and organometallic compounds; specifically how the molecular orbital theory can be used to predict structure and properties. This course covers kinetics, mechanisms, and catalysis. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 202 as prerequisite..

CHEM 203L: Advanced Reactivity Lab

IN CHEM 203L students will be exposed to the practical aspects of working with small molecules, both organic and inorganic. Students will learn to analyze and synthesize compounds and analyze their characteristic properties such as structure, function, size distribution, and purity. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM 202L prereq 203 coreq.

CHEM 203Z: Advanced Reactivity

CHEM 203Z builds on themes of structure and reactivity established in CHEM 202Z. The course will blend biomolecular, inorganic, and organic elements of reactivity, using molecular orbital theory to predict structure and properties, and introducing modern examples of catalysis and catalytic cycles. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 202Z as prerequisite.

CHEM 203ZL: Advanced Reactivity Lab

Chem 203zL introduces more sophisticated methods for studying the reactivity of compounds. The preparation and structure elucidation of organic and organometallic compounds will be studied in the context of a research lab type setting. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM 202ZL pre/CHEM 203Z coreq.

CHEM 204: Macromolecules

The relationship between sequence, structure, and function of macromolecules. The course will progress from exploring these themes in the context of synthesis, characterization, and utility of simple organic polymers to understanding the properties of complex,chemically diverse biomolecules. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 203 or 222 as prereq..

CHEM 204L: Macromolecules Lab

The relationship between sequence, structure, and function of macromolecules focusing on the practical aspects of macromolecular synthesis, structural and functional characterization, and degradation. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM 203L prereq./204 coreq..

CHEM 205: Light and Matter

CHEM 205 will address the origins of electronic orbitals and the quantized energy states associated with molecular motions. How light causes transitions between energy levels will be central to our discussion, illuminating topics from spectroscopy to the Earth??s climate and solar energy conversion. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 203/MATH 111 prereq..

CHEM 205L: Light and Matter Lab

CHEM 205L will connect your understanding of the interaction of light & matter to the determination of molecular structure through spectroscopic methods. Students will assign atomic/molecular spectra & analyze results to determine critical properties of the compound using rigorous math on real molecules. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM203L/MATH111CHEM205.

CHEM 221: Organic Chemistry I

Classes of organic compounds. Functional groups, bonding, stereochemistry, structure and reactivity, carbonyl chemistry, carboxylic acids. GER Note: When a student completes this course and associated lab course they will have satisfied the requirement for SNTL. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 142 as prerequisite.

CHEM 221L: Organic Chemistry Laboratory 1

This lab covers techniques for isolation, purification, preparation, and identification of organic compounds. Investigative experiments uncover relationships between molecular structure and function. Important skills are collecting and interpreting data, keeping a lab notebook, and working safely. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: Chem 221 as Pre/Co Req.

CHEM 221Z: Organic Chemistry I

Classes of organic compounds. Functional groups, bonding, stereochemistry, structure and reactivity, carbonyl chemistry, carboxylic acids. GER Note: When a student completes this course and associated lab course they will have satisfied the requirement for SNTL. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

CHEM 222: Organic Chemistry II

Spring, summer. Nucleophilic substitution, elimination reactions, electrophilic additions, electrophilic substitution, carbohydrates, amino acids and proteins. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 221/221Z/202 as prereq..

CHEM 222L: Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2

This course introduces more sophisticated methods for the preparation and structure elucidation of organic compounds in the context of a research lab. Emphasis is placed on experimental design, evaluation of data, structure determination using NMR, and keeping a research-style lab notebook. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM 221L/226L/222 as Pre/Co.

CHEM 222Z: Organic Chemistry II

This class emphasizes principles of structure elucidation, stereochemistry, synthesis, and mechanism. Reaction types are described using structural theory and principles of reactivity. Organic compounds and their reactivity in living organisms is discussed. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 221Z.

CHEM 226L: Organic Chemistry Lab I

Two three-hour laboratories a week. Designed for students planning to do graduate work. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM 221/221z as Prereq.

CHEM 227L: Organic Chemistry Lab II

Two three-hour labs per week. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM 221L/226L/222 as Pre/Co.

CHEM 250: Inorganic Chemistry I

The chemistry of common and important elements; applications of structural, thermodynamic, and kinetic principles. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 222Z(172) as prerequisite.

CHEM 260: Quant Analytical Chemistry

Quantitative analysis, including techniques such as electroanalytical chemistry, absorption and emission spectroscopy, gas-liquid chromatography, electrophoresis, and radioimmunoassay. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 142/171 202 as Prereq.

CHEM 260L: Analytical Chemistry Lab

Introduction to quantitative analytical techniques. Experiments will focus on titrations, spectroscopy, chromatography, and electrochemistry. Credit Hours: 1. Requisites: CHEM 260 as Pre/Co Req.

CHEM 300: Phys Chem. for Life Sciences

Basic thermodynamics, thermochemistry, chemical equilibria, kinetics, and related topics. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 260/MATH as Prereq.

CHEM 300L: Analytical Tools & Techniques

This is a project-design based lab course. It will bring together materials from previous lab courses, as well as covering new techniques/methods. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM 204L & CHEM 205L pre/co.

CHEM 301: Biochemistry I

An integrated approach to the synthesis, structure, and function of macromolecular biomolecules, including proteins, carbohydrates, DNA, and RNA. First half of a two-semester biochemistry sequence. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 222/BIOL 141 as prereq..

CHEM 302: Biochemistry II

Prerequisites: Biology/Chemistry 301, Chemistry 222, Biology 141. Topics will include nitrogen and fatty acid metabolism, glycolysis, and respiration. The evolution of the pathways associated with these processes will be explored. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 301or BIOL 301.

CHEM 320: Topic In Bio-Organic Chemistry

Chemistry of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, nucleic acids, vitamins and enzymes; emphasis on structure and reactions of compounds. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: CHEM 222/172 as Prereq.

CHEM 327: Organometallic Chemistry

Introduction to transition metal Organometallic chemistry. Structure of metal complexes, their reactivity, reaction mechanisms, catalysis and application in synthesis. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 222/172 as Prereq.

CHEM 327L: Organometallic Chemistry Lab

The laboratory focuses on the preparation and applications of transition metal organometallic complexes. The course involves an independent research project envisioned by the student. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM 327/222L/227L as prereq.

CHEM 328: Intro.to Atmospheric Chemistry

This course will provide knowledge in atmospheric chemistry, focusing on the physical and chemical processes. Students will be able to: 1) explain important atmospheric phenomena from the local to global scale; and 2) critically assess public discussions and media coverage on air pollution. Credit Hours: 3.

CHEM 330: Chem Bio & Molecular Modeling

Examine the world including issues around natural and unnatural molecules, disease and society in the context of topics like drugs, molecules for Mars, aging, AIDS, bioterrorism, and crime in the courtroom using computer graphics, the molecular structure of small molecules and proteins, and energy. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 221/221z as Prereq.

CHEM 331: Physical Chemistry I

Introduction to quantum chemistry, valence and bonding, physical properties, and molecular structure. GER Note: When a student completes this course and associated lab course they will have satisfied the requirement for SNTL. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: PHYS142/CH222/CH260/M112.

CHEM 331L: Physical Chemistry Lab I

Introduction to physical chemical measurement, with consideration given to analysis of data for precision, accuracy, and propagation of errors. Experiments focus on kinetics, spectroscopy, quantum mechanics, and application of computer techniques. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: Add CHEM 260L as prerequisite.

CHEM 331LW: Physical Chemistry Lab I

Introduction to physical chemical measurement, with consideration given to analysis of data for precision, accuracy, and propagation of errors. Experiments focus on kinetics, spectroscopy, quantum mechanics, and application of computer techniques. General Education Requirement: SNLW. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 331 as Prereq.

CHEM 332: Physical Chemistry II

Properties of materials, thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics. GER Note: When a student completes this course and associated lab course they will have satisfied the requirement for SNTL. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 331 as Prereq.

CHEM 332L: Physical Chemistry Lab II

Experiments focus on thermodynamics and material properties. Instruction in computer use continued. GER Note: When this course and its associated lecture course are completed, students will satisfy the SNTL requirement. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM 331L as prereq.

CHEM 332LW: Physical Chemistry Lab II

Experiments focus on thermodynamics and material properties. Instruction in computer use continued. GER Note: When this course and its associated lecture course are completed, students will satisfy the SNTL requirement. General Education Requirement: SNLW. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 331L as prereq.

CHEM 346L: Biomolecular Chemistry

Experiments involve analysis and characterization of the major classes of biological compounds. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: BIOL142/301,CHEM301 as prereq.

CHEM 347L: Bioanalytical Chemistry Lab

Topics in modern biological chemistry are studied using techniques that may include polymerase chain reaction, DNA cloning, electrophoresis, protein detection by immunoblot, and computer analysis of DNA and protein sequence data, and spectroscopy. Credit Hours: 1.

CHEM 350: Inorganic Chemistry

Intermediate-level course covering structures and reactivity of coordination compounds and solid state inorganic materials. GER Note: Completion of this course and associated lab satisfies the SNTL requirement. Completion of this course and lab only completes half of the SNT requirement. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM142/222/300/331 as prereq.

CHEM 355L: Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

Experimental techniques commonly used in synthetic inorganic research laboratories. GER Note: When this course and its associated lecture course are completed, students will satisfy the SNTL requirement. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM 350 as prereq.

CHEM 360: Instrumental Analysis

Advanced course covering topics such as treatment of chemical data, absorption and emission spectroscopy, electroanalytical chemistry, and modern separation techniques. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 260/331.

CHEM 365L: Analysis of Ancient Art

Introduce a variety of instrumental techniques, including spectroscopy, chromatography, and x-ray methods applied int eh context of cultural heritage studies and conservation research, with specific cases and laboratory exercises related to antiquities within the Michael C. Carlos Museum. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 222/222L/227L/260.

CHEM 370: Special Topics in Chemistry

A seminar for advanced students on topics of current interest in chemistry. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: CHEM 204 or CHEM 205 prereq..

CHEM 370W: Special Topics in Chemistry

A seminar for advanced students on topics of current interest in chemistry. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5. Requisites: CHEM 204 or CHEM 205 prereq..

CHEM 371L: Special Lab Topics in Chem.

A laboratory course for advanced students on topics of current interest in chemistry. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: CHEM 300L as prerequisite.

CHEM 371LW: Special Lab Topics in Chem.

A laboratory course for advanced students on topics of current interest in chemistry. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5. Requisites: CHEM 300L as prerequisite.

CHEM 392R: Chem Mentors:Peer-Led Learning

This purpose of this course is to train those students who have been selected by the Department of Chemistry to serve as Chem Mentors for Chem 141/142. The course is by permission only. Note that this course may not be used to satisfy elective credit for the chemistry major. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: CHEM 141 and CHEM 142 prereq..

CHEM 399R: Introduction To Research

Introduces students to instrumental procedures and empirical techniques used in chemical research. Total credit not to exceed four hours. Cannot be used to meet course requirements for a chemistry major. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CHEM 430: Computational Chemistry

Computational methods and examples in chemistry. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CHEM 331 as Prereq.

CHEM 435: Molecular Simulation Chem Bio

Content includes an introduction to techniques for modeling the dynamics and interactions of molecules, emphasizing biomolecules. Students will learn molecular dynamics and other methods and apply them, using state-of-the-art simulation and animation software. Credit Hours: 3.

CHEM 468: Perspectives in Chemistry

A capstone seminar series for graduating chemistry majors. The course takes an interdisciplinary look at applications of chemistry. Topics include the environment, art, medicine, forensics, etc. Credit Hours: 3.

CHEM 468W: Perspectives in Chemistry

A capstone seminar series for graduating chemistry majors. The course takes an interdisciplinary look at applications of chemistry. Topics include the environment, art, medicine, forensics, etc. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

CHEM 470: Special Topics in Chemistry

A seminar for advanced students on topics of current interest in chemistry. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CHEM 470W: Special Topics in Chemistry

A seminar for advanced students on topics of current interest in chemistry. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

CHEM 475R: Chemistry Seminar

This course explores current chemical research at an advanced level. Students will encounter specialized problems at the frontiers of chemistry by drawing on literature as well as presentations by guest speakers from industry, government, and academe, including the Emory community. Credit Hours: 1.

CHEM 495R: Honors Thesis

Honors Program. Credit Hours: 3.

CHEM 495RW: Honors Thesis

Honors Program. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

CHEM 497R: Supervised Reading

Credit, up to four hours per semester. May be repeated for credit, total credit not to exceed eight hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Cannot be used to meet course requirements for a chemistry major. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CHEM 499R: Undergraduate Research

Students do original research in accordance with ability and background and present their findings in an oral or poster session. May be repeated. Total research credit to be used toward an undergraduate degree not to exceed twelve hours. 4 hours can count to BS elective. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CHEM 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Chemistry. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Chinese Language

CHN 101: Elementary Chinese I

This is the first of two courses designed to introduce students to modern Mandarin Chinese. The course begins with an introduction to the sound system of Mandarin Chinese and moves on to basic skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing, and an introduction to Chinese culture. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

CHN 102: Elementary Chinese II

Prerequisite: CHN 101. This course is the second semester of the Elementary Chinese course.. Speaking, reading, listening and writing will be learned in communicative context. Students are expected to participate in class by engaging in interactive activities and reading and writing practices. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

CHN 103: Elem Chn: Heritage Speakers

This course is designed for students who already possess basic speaking skills of Mandarin Chinese but are not literate in Mandarin Chinese. It will focus on improving students' reading and writing skills. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

CHN 105: Chinese Language Studies Abrd

Placement determined according to proficiency. This course is exclusively for students studying Chinese through an Emory-affiliated summer abroad program. Students learn practical Mandarin Chinese in natural settings. A Chinese martial arts master will also provide instruction twice per week. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 111: Elementary Chinese Abroad I

This is the first of the two elementary Chinese courses, offered only in Emory's summer study abroad program in China. Students learn the sound system of Chinese, acquire basic communicative skills in Chinese in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. They also learn aspects of Chinese culture. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 112: Elementary Chinese Abroad II

This is the second of the two elementary Chinese courses, offered only in Emory's summer study abroad program in China. It is designed for those who have taken CHN 101 or CHN 111. The course aims to further develop communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Chinese. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 190: Freshman Seminar

Freshmen only to satisfy GER freshman seminar requirement. Please see website for updated offerings. Course topics have included Foreigners in Imperial China; Mind and Body in China; Shanghai: Lure of the Modern. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 201: Intermediate Chinese I

This course is designed to help students to reach intermediate level communicative skill both in spoken and written Chinese and to establish a solid base for more advanced language learning. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 202: Intermediate Chinese II

This course provides intermediate-level training in spoken and written Chinese in cultural context, based on language skills developed in CHN 201. Attention is given to complex grammatical patterns, discourse characteristics, and discussions of cultural topics. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 203: Interm.CHN for Heritage Spkrs

This course is designed for heritage speakers of Mandarin Chinese and is a continuation of CHN 103. The emphasis is on improving students' reading and writing skills. It prepares students for further study at the advanced level. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

CHN 210R: Chinese Calligraphy

Students will gain basic knowledge of how to write and appreciate East Asian brush calligraphy. Topics include: materials and tools, structure of characters, history and development of styles, the importance of calligraphy in East Asia, and the basic strokes of standard style. Credit Hours: 1.

CHN 211: Intermediate Chinese Abroad I

This is the first of two intermediate Chinese courses, offered only in Emory's study abroad program in China. It is designed to help students reach intermediate level communicative skills in both spoken and written Chinese by expanding their linguistic and cultural knowledge. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 212: Intermediate Chinese Abroad II

Offered only in Emory's summer study abroad program in China, the course provides intermediate level training in spoken and written Chinese in cultural context, based on skills developed in CHN 201 or CHN 211. Attention is given to complex grammatical patterns and discussions of cultural topics. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 215: Chn.ArtCultSoc thr Calligraphy

This course introduces students to Chinese calligraphy in its artistic, cultural and historical contexts. Combining systematic hands-on practice with reading, writing, and research, it engages students in examining the aesthetic values, intellectual metaphors, and moral criteria that calligraphy embodies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 216: East Asian Calligraphy

Studies East Asian calligraphy in artistic, cultural, and historical contexts, starting with the immediate aspects of calligraphy as a traditional art form, and then reaching beyond the classically defined discipline to examine its aesthetic values, intellectual metaphors, and moral criteria. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 216W: East Asian Calligraphy

Studies East Asian calligraphy in artistic, cultural, and historical contexts, starting with the immediate aspects of calligraphy as a traditional art form, and then reaching beyond the classically defined discipline to examine its aesthetic values, intellectual metaphors, and moral criteria. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 230: Descript'n & Analysis:Chn Lang

An overview of important elements of the Chinese language and its use. Students will gain an understanding of the history of the language, as well as the phonological, semantic, and syntactic structures of modern Chinese. Also examines cultural and social issues surrounding the Chinese language. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 232: Chinese:How Hast Thou Changed

"This course introduces the development of Chinese language from proto Sino-Tibetan roots to modern standard Chinese, and presents the chronological changes in syntax and phonology. We will discuss key historical stages in Chinese developments, and analyze it from the view of linguistics aspects.". General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 232W: Chinese:How Hast Thou Changed

General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 235: Chinese Writ. Systems in Asia

This course examines the manners and contexts in which the Chinese writing systems interface with other languages and cultures (Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) and the cultural identities that the Chinese orthographic symbols come to represent at both personal and social levels in and beyond Asia. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 235W: Chinese Writ. Systems in Asia

This course examines the manners and contexts in which the Chinese writing systems interface with other languages and cultures (Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) and the cultural identities that the Chinese orthographic symbols come to represent at both personal and social levels in and beyond Asia. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 250: Intro to East Asian Studies

Required for East Asian Studies Majors and Minors. An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to major topics and methodologies in East Asian Studies, with an emphasis on writing, research, and critical thinking. Themes include history, literature, religion, and the arts. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 250W: Intro to East Asian Studies

Required for East Asian Studies Majors and Minors. An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to major topics and methodologies in East Asian Studies, with an emphasis on writing, research, and critical thinking. Themes include history, literature, religion, and the arts. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 260: East Asia: 1500 to Present

This course will emphasize transnational aspects of East Asian history, focusing on how the East Asian international system interacted with Southeast Asia, South Asia, Inner Asia, as well as with Europe and the U.S. from 1500 to the present. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 271: Modern China in Film & Fiction

This course is an examination of twentieth-century Chinese society through cinematic productions and a critical reading of the writings of major Chinese writers in translation. Emphasis on self and society in a changing culture and the nature and function of literature in modern nation-building. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 271W: Mod China in Film and Fiction

This course is an examination of twentieth-century Chinese society through cinematic productions and a critical reading of the writings of major Chinese writers in translation. Emphasis on self and society in a changing culture and the nature and function of literature in modern nation-building. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 272: Lit.in Early & Imperial China

This course is an examination of twentieth-century Chinese society through cinematic productions and a critical reading of the writings of major Chinese writers in translation. Emphasis on self and society in a changing culture and the nature and function of literature in modern nation-building. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 272W: Lit. in Early & Imperial China

This course is an examination of twentieth-century Chinese society through cinematic productions and a critical reading of the writings of major Chinese writers in translation. Emphasis on self and society in a changing culture and the nature and function of literature in modern nation-building. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 273: The Heritage of China

This course is a general introduction to Chinese history, culture and literary tradition. It is designed to acquaint the students to ideas, institutions, aspects of life, literature and arts that are essential to an educated understanding of the Chinese world. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 278: Revolutions & Republics: China

Spanning the period that covers the First Sino-Japanese War (1895) through present, this course will explore the major transformations reshaping and reinventing cultural, political, and economic life in China through the shifting meanings of "revolution" and "republic.". General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 279W: Post-Mao? China After 1976

This course introduces students to the history, culture, society, and politics of China since 1976 through an exploration of the continuities and discontinuities knitting pre and post 1976 China. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 301: Adv Chinese I: Oral/Writ Comm

First semester of Advanced Chinese. The course emphasizes advanced reading, grammar and conversation. Authentic reading materials are included in each lesson, such as newspaper articles, television, works of fiction, and film. Students will learn to read both traditional and simplified characters. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 302: Adv Chinese II

Students will continue to develop their skills in Chinese by reading, discussing, and writing about topics in contemporary China. They will also practice formulating and expressing their ideas in Chinese. Students will develop an enriched understanding of traditions in Chinese culture and society. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 302W: Adv Chinese II

Students will continue to develop their skills in Chinese by reading, discussing, and writing about topics in contemporary China. They will also practice formulating and expressing their ideas in Chinese. Students will develop an enriched understanding of traditions in Chinese culture and society. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 303: Adv. Chn.for Heritage Speakers

An advanced course for heritage learners with emphasis on improving reading and writing abilities. Through reading and discussion of texts on Chinese life, culture, and society, the course enhances students??? overall Chinese proficiency and understanding of the Chinese culture. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 303W: Adv. Chn.for Heritage Speakers

An advanced course for heritage learners with emphasis on improving reading and writing abilities. Through reading and discussion of texts on Chinese life, culture, and society, the course enhances students??? overall Chinese proficiency and understanding of the Chinese culture. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 311: Advanced Chinese Abroad I

Offered only in Emory's summer study abroad program in China, the course focuses on developing students' advanced language abilities through reading and discussions of texts on the changing attitudes and values of modern China. Reading of authentic texts and conversationalist skills are stressed. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 312: Advanced Chinese Abroad II

Offered only in Emory's summer study abroad program in China, the course aims to develop students' advanced skills in Chinese through reading, discussing, and writing about topics on modern China. Students will develop an enriched understanding of the traditions and changes in Chinese culture. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 314: Sem.Study of Chn.Lang.Abroad

This course is designated for Chinese language courses taken on Emory approved study abroad programs in Fall or Spring semester. This is a variable credit hours course. Students will be avarded credit hours for this course in the event that they have completed other language courses at the appropriate levels. Credit Hours: 1-6. Requisites: CHN 202 as prerequisite.

CHN 315: Chinese Studies Abroad

This course is designated for topics of Chinese studies taken on Emory approved study abroad programs in Fall or Spring semesters. This is a variable credit hours course. Credit Hours: 1-6.

CHN 319: Chinese Drama

The course is an introduction to traditional Chinese drama, from the13th to the 20th century. We will focus on drama as literature but we will also explore the social, material, and performative dimensions of theater, including modern-day stage adaptations of traditional plays. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 319W: Chinese Drama

The course is an introduction to traditional Chinese drama, from the 13th to the 20th century. We will focus on drama as literature but we will also explore the social, material, and performative dimensions of theater, including modern-day stage adaptations of traditional plays. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 335: Chinese Lang,Culture & Soc.

Examines the intersection of language, culture, and society in modern China. Investigates the linguistic construction of social identities based on gender, ethnicity, age, power relation, and other factors, and ideologies that shape language use in China and in the global Chinese diaspora. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 335W: Chinese Lang,Culture & Soc.

Examines the intersection of language, culture, and society in modern China. Investigates the linguistic construction of social identities based on gender, ethnicity, age, power relation, and other factors, and ideologies that shape language use in China and in the global Chinese diaspora. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 350: East Asian Martial Arts

East Asian martial arts are often portrayed as ancient, timeless, and even mystical, but they have a history. In this course we explore how military techniques intended for use in war, policing, and banditry came to be practiced as methods of moral, spiritual, and physical self-cultivation. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 350W: East Asian Martial Arts

East Asian martial arts are often portrayed as ancient, timeless, and even mystical, but they have a history. In this course we explore how military techniques intended for use in war, policing, and banditry came to be practiced as methods of moral, spiritual, and physical self-cultivation. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 351: Business Chinese

This course is an introduction to basic written and oral communication skills for business and trade negotiations with Mainland China and Taiwan. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 358: War and Chinese Society

How did war transform Chinese society? From 1937-1949, China was engulfed in war. Using a wide range of primary and secondary sources, we explore both the major players and problems in wartime China, as well as the longterm social and cultural implications of war and society. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 358W: War and Chinese Society

How did war transform Chinese society? From 1937-1949, China was engulfed in war. Using a wide range of primary and secondary sources, we explore both the major players and problems in wartime China, as well as the longterm social and cultural implications of war and society. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 359: Women and Religion in China

This course will examine the impacts of Confucianism, Taoism and Mahayana Buddhism in shaping the social experiences, roles and images of women in twentieth-century China and Taiwan. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 359W: Women and Religion in China

This course will examine the impacts of Confucianism, Taoism and Mahayana Buddhism in shaping the social experiences, roles and images of women in twentieth-century China and Taiwan. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 360: Mod.Chn.Women in Film & Fict.

An examination of woman as a trope in Chinese literature and cinema. It explores how "woman" became a cultural construct and how that construct has redefined gender roles and femininity in changing historical contexts from pre-modern to modern Eras. All readings are in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 360W: Mod.Chn.Women in Film & Fict.

An examination of woman as a trope in Chinese literature and cinema. It explores how "woman" became a cultural construct and how that construct has redefined gender roles and femininity in changing historical contexts from pre-modern to modern Eras. All readings are in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 363: The Political Economy of China

This course covers the economic and political systems in the People??s Republic of China. It first presents a history of their coevolution, and then examines different sectors in depth, including the opportunities and challenges involved, for Chinese leadership, people, and the world. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 & ECON 112 as prereq..

CHN 365: Lit & Cult Late Imperial China

This course offers an introduction to the culture and literature of late imperial China. We will discuss a wide selection of literary works from the late 16th to 18th centuries as a prism to reflect on the broader intellectual, social, and cultural history of the period. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 365W: Lit & Cult Late Imperial China

This course offers an introduction to the culture and literature of late imperial China. We will discuss a wide selection of literary works from the late 16th to 18th centuries as a prism to reflect on the broader intellectual, social, and cultural history of the period. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 368: Writing Women in Trad.China

This course surveys the rich and varied tradition of women's literature that developed throughout imperial Chinese history (roughly from the 1st c. AD to the early 20th c.). General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 368W: Writing Women in Trad.China

This course surveys the rich and varied tradition of women's literature that developed throughout imperial Chinese history (roughly from the 1st c. AD to the early 20th c.). General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 370: Noodle Narratives/Silk Road

There are unmistakable similarities between Italian and Chinese cultures regarding the noodle. In fact, the noodle evokes family traditions, rituals, symbolism, and emotional connection in both cultures. Our class explores how identity, assimilation and cultural integration are manifested in food. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 370W: Noodle Narratives/Silk Road

There are unmistakable similarities between Italian and Chinese cultures regarding the noodle. In fact, the noodle evokes family traditions, rituals, symbolism, and emotional connection in both cultures. Our class explores how identity, assimilation and cultural integration are manifested in food. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 373: Confucian Classics

Confucian Classics shaped Chinese literati culture from late antiquity to the early 20th century. The goal of this course is to illustrate the diversity of literary and cultural practices that evolved around Confucius' unique body of writings (551 - 479 BC). Knowledge of Chinese is not necessary. . General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 373W: Confucian Classics

Confucian Classics shaped Chinese literati culture from late antiquity to the early 20th century. The goal of this course is to illustrate the diversity of literary and cultural practices that evolved around Confucius' unique body of writings (551 - 479 BC). Knowledge of Chinese is not necessary. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 375: Topics in Chinese Studies

Study of Chinese language, literature, thought or culture, alone or in conjunction with other literary or cultural trends. Topics to be announced in advance. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CHN 375W: Topics in Chinese Studies

Study of Chinese language, literature, thought or culture, alone or in conjunction with other literary or cultural trends. Topics to be announced in advance. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

CHN 388: The Cultural Revolution

A survey of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966 - 1976). Students will study revolutionary songs, films, and model plays, in addition to the visual and material culture of the period. Students will also stage a performance of Taking Tiger Mountain by Strategy. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 388W: The Cultural Revolution

A survey of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966 - 1976). Students will study revolutionary songs, films, and model plays, in addition to the visual and material culture of the period. Students will also stage a performance of Taking Tiger Mountain by Strategy. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 5.

CHN 394: Screening China

The course explores the history and development of Chinese cinema. It discusses "film in China" and "China in film" by focusing on the function of cinema and reconfigurations of time, space, gender, and history in Chinese films under different historical conditions since the early twentieth century. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 394W: Screening China

The course explores the history and development of Chinese cinema. It discusses "film in China" and "China in film" by focusing on the function of cinema and reconfigurations of time, space, gender, and history in Chinese films under different historical conditions since the early twentieth century. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 397R: Directed Study

Variable credit. Permission only, discretion of instructor. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CHN 401: Adv.Readings in Modern Chn.I

Conducted in Chinese, this course focuses on readings and discussion of authentic reading material. The goal is to develop students' knowledge of Chinese culture and ability to understand and use Chinese at a more advanced level. This course is designed for non-heritage track students only. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 401W: Adv Readings in Modern Chn I

Conducted in Chinese, this course focuses on readings and discussion of authentic reading material. The goal is to develop students' knowledge of Chinese culture and ability to understand and use Chinese at a more advanced level. This course is designed for non-heritage track students only. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 402: Adv Readings in Modern Chn II

This course focuses on readings and discussion of material from contemporary works of Chinese literature in conjunction with the movies that are based upon them; reading of Chinese newspapers and viewing TV programs. Class is conducted in Chinese. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 402W: Adv Readings in Modern Chn II

This course focuses on readings and discussion of material from contemporary works of Chinese literature in conjunction with the movies that are based upon them; reading of Chinese newspapers and viewing TV programs. Class is conducted in Chinese. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 403: Adv.High CHN for Heritage Spkr

This is a post-advanced course for Chinese heritage speakers. Through close reading and intensive writing on major social issues of contemporary China, it aims to further enhance students' Chinese language proficiency and deepen their understanding of the Chinese society beyond the advanced level. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 403W: Adv.High CHN for Heritage Spkr

This is a post-advanced course for Chinese heritage speakers. Through close reading and intensive writing on major social issues of contemporary China, it aims to further enhance students' Chinese language proficiency and deepen their understanding of the Chinese society beyond the advanced level. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 404: Contemp. Chinese Literature

This course enhances students' Chinese proficiency at the advanced level and understanding of the Chinese society through close reading and discussion of expository writings and short fictional pieces. Prerequisites: CHN402 for students in the non-heritage track; CHN303 in the heritage track. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 408: Intro to Classical Chinese

Students will read selections of philosophical and literary texts in Classical Chinese and acquire knowledge of Classical Chinese grammar and lexicon. The course is for students who have taken CHN401 and can be taken in place of CHN402 to fulfill the language requirement for the Chinese major. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 411: Adv.Read.Mod.Chinese Abroad I

Offered only in Emory's summer study abroad program in China, the course focuses on readings and discussions of authentic texts from a variety of genres including social, political, journalistic texts and important works on literature. It aims to enhance language skills at more advanced levels. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 412: Adv.Read.Mod.Chinese Abroad II

Offered only in Emory's summer study abroad program in China, the course focuses on readings and discussions of authentic texts from contemporary Chinese literature, Chinese newspapers, internet, and TV programs. Acquisition of written style Chinese is stressed in this course. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 425: Food and Culture in East Asia

In this course, we will place food under analytic scrutiny and explore the variegated histories of food in East Asia. We will interrogate the different ways of imagining, understanding, and defining Asian foods and explore how human relationships to food in East Asia have changed over time. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 425W: Food and Culture in East Asia

In this course, we will place food under analytic scrutiny and explore the variegated histories of food in East Asia. We will interrogate the different ways of imagining, understanding, and defining Asian foods and explore how human relationships to food in East Asia have changed over time. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 450: Seminar in East Asian Studies

Required for East Asian Studies majors. An advanced seminar probing themes in the study of East Asia. Topics may include issues in comparative colonialism, the volatility of shared meanings of identity as well as reconstructions of national subjects in literature, popular culture, and the arts. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 450W: Seminar in East Asian Studies

Required for East Asian Studies majors. An advanced seminar probing themes in the study of East Asia. Topics may include issues in comparative colonialism, the volatility of shared meanings of identity as well as reconstructions of national subjects in literature, popular culture, and the arts. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

CHN 495A: Honors Chinese I

Permission only, discretion of instructor. See requirements for Honors Degree. Credit Hours: 3.

CHN 495BW: Honors Chinese

Permission only, discretion of instructor. See requirements for Honors Degree. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

CHN 496R: Chinese Language Internship

Variable credit. Permission only, discretion of instructor. Provides students of Chinese an opportunity to use their Chinese language skills outside the classroom, exposing them to a variety of native speakers in a number of different situations. Students will be assigned to a number of tasks: interpreting at appointments with social workers, doctors, dentists, welfare workers, food and clothing banks and at job interviews, as well as assisting customers and doing Chinese word processing in Chinese travel agencies and other types of businesses. Students are advised to be flexible as different tasks may be assigned each day. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CHN 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Chinese. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Classics

CL 100: Hero and Antihero

An examination of the heroic figure in Greek and Roman literature and culture, focusing on such famous texts as Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and Vergil's Aeneid in their historical, political, and/or artistic context. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 101: Hero and Antihero Expanded

An examination of the heroic figure in Greek and Roman literature and culture, focusing on such famous texts as Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and Vergil's Aeneid in their historical, political, and/or artistic context. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

CL 102: Classical Mythology

An introduction to Greek and Roman myths and the variety of approaches available for their study. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

CL 103: Greek Archaeology

An introduction to the archaeological evidence of ancient Greek culture. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

CL 104: Anc't Cities and Urban Culture

An introduction to the urban life and city planning of the ancient world, including the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

CL 150: Masterworks of Classical Lit

This reading-intensive class introduces students to some of the major authors, works, and genres of the classical canon, stretching from the 8th century BC epics of Homer to the works of Imperial Rome. We will wrestle with the major themes and concerns of a variety of ancient poetic and prose texts. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 190: Freshman Seminar

Limited to freshmen. Topic changes to reflect changing interests of faculty and students. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 201: The Greeks

A general survey of ancient Greek literature and culture. Study of the major texts of ancient Greece in their social, historical and archaeological context. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 202: The Romans

A survey of ancient Rome, from its origins in legend and myth to late antiquity, as seen through its principal literary texts in their historical, social, and cultural context. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 203: Greeks & Romans By Hollywood

Study of the influence of Greek and Roman culture on films and the film industry. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 204: Classical Greek Drama

A survey of Greek tragedy and comedy of the fifth century BC, focusing on selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 211: Classicl Epic & Its Influence

Readings in such classical epics as Homer's Iliad or Odyssey, Vergil's Aeneid, and their influence on later works such as Dante's Divine Comedy, Milton's Paradise Lost, or Kazantzakis' Odyssey: A Sequel. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 212: Anc't Lyric and Its Influence

"Study in translation of Greek and/or Roman lyric poetry and its influence on later lyric. Selections from Greek poets such as Sappho, Anacreon, Simonides, and Pindar, and Roman poets such as Catullus and Horace.". General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 213: Ancient Comedy

An introduction to the plays of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus and Terence. Topics include the nature of humor and jokes, parody, and comedy's role in ancient societies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 214: Ancient Drama

A survey of ancient drama, focusing on selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 215: Greek and Roman Religion

Introduction to the religions of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds: ritual types, forms of evidence, and methods of investigation, from the Bronze Age to the early Christian era. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 216: Greek and Roman Historians

Greek and Roman Historians: A survey of Greek and Roman history-writing, with attention to its development, narrative styles, and historical aims. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 217: Intellectual History of Greece

A survey of major intellectual developments in ancient Greece and of the individual thinkers that contributed to them. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 218: Ancient Novel & Its Influence

A study of ancient fiction and romance and their influence on later Western literature. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 219: Anc't Dialogue & its Influence

Study of one or more important ancient genre. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 220: Bronze Age Greece

The material culture of the Greek Bronze Age architecture. ceramic, glyptic, sculpture, and metalwork; an investigation of the human activities surrounding these artifacts, the cultural systems in which they operated, the conditions and methods of production use and exchange. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 221: Art&Architecture of Anc.Greece

An investigation of ancient Greek art and architecture from its Iron Age beginnings through the legacy of Alexander the Great, concentrating on the creation of monumental stone sculpture and ordered buildings, visual interpretation of Greek mythology, and the interaction of art, ritual and politics. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 222: Art & Architec of Ancient Rome

The Roman genius for cultural assimilation and innovative techniques transformed the art of the ancient Mediterranean. The course investigates major achievements in sculpture, painting, and architecture and their resonances with Roman politics, society, and religion. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 224: Early Greece: Myth and Reason

Literature, art, and culture from Homer's time to the early Presocratics. Includes examination of archaic conceptions of death, cosmos, community, beauty, justice, and intelligence as reflected in the art, literature, and philosophy of the period. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 225: Classical Athens

Greek literature, art, and culture in the time of Pericles and Socrates. The development of tragedy and comedy, participatory democracy, oratory, history and philosophy, painting, architecture, and sculpture in fifth-century Athens. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 225W: Classical Athens

Greek literature, art, and culture in the time of Pericles and Socrates. The development of tragedy and comedy, participatory democracy, oratory, history and philosophy, painting, architecture, and sculpture in fifth-century Athens. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CL 227: The Age of Augustus

A study of Golden Age literature, art, and culture during the reign of Rome's first emperor. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 228: Age of Nero: Art and Decadence

A study of Silver Age literature, art, and culture during the reign of Nero. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 253: Eng Literature & The Classics

The reception of Greek and Roman literary traditions in English literature as seen in the development of one or more genres, such as epic, tragedy, comedy, satire, and the novel. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 255: Greeks, Romans, Jews, Christns

Survey of social, cultural, and religious interaction during the Hellenistic and Roman period. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 265: Ancient and Modern Science

A comparative investigation of the relationship between science in the ancient world and the practice of science today. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 265W: Ancient and Modern Science

A comparative investigation of the relationship between science in the ancient world and the practice of science today. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

CL 289: Studies in Ancient Genres

Study of one ancient literary genre in depth (genre topic varies). General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 290R: Directed Study

Directed study in Classics. Topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CL 301: Greek and Roman Law

A comparative study of Greek and Roman law systems. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 302: Women in Antiquity

The roles and images of women in Greece and Rome as presented in literary, artistic, and documentary sources. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 303: Eng Literature & the Classics

The Greco-Roman tradition in English literature as seen in the development of one or more genres. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 304: Classical & Renaissance Drama

Studies in classical drama and its reception and re-imagination in Renaissance dramatic texts. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 305: Jews,Christns,Greeks&Romans

Development of an integrated understanding of social, cultural, and religious interaction during the Hellenistic and Roman periods. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 306: The Ancient Drinking Party

A study of the archeological, artistic, literary, and historical evidence for the ancient symposium (or drinking party) and its impact on ancient society. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 307: Sex & Society In Antiquity

Study of sexuality in ancient Greece and Rome through the examination of texts and material culture. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 309: Warfare in Classical Culture

Studies in warfare, both as it was practiced and as it was imagined in the Greek and Roman worlds, with examination of its cultural and social impact. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 310: Greek & Roman Law

Greek and Roman Law: Introduction to the sources, principles, and development of Greek and Roman law. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 311: Greek and Roman Historians

Greek and Roman Historians: Reading of one or more books by ancient historians with attention to narrative styles, critical methods, and historical aims. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 312: Classical Mythology

Advanced study of selected themes and characters from Greek mythology. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 314: Classical Epic & Its Influence

Advanced readings in Homer, Vergil, or Ovid and their successors in the genre. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 316: Greek Archaeology

Advanced study of topics in Greek archaeology. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 317: Vergil and Dante

Reading of Vergil's Aeneid and Dante's Divine Comedy in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 317W: Vergil and Dante

Reading of Vergil's Aeneid and Dante's Divine Comedy in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CL 321: Eng Literature & the Classics

The reception of Greek and Roman literary traditions in English literature as seen in the development of one or more genres, such as epic, tragedy, comedy, satire, and the novel. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 322: Greek Drama in Translation

Advanced study of one or more specific aspects of Greek drama. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 325: Classical Trad & Amer Founding

A study of the role of the Greco-Roman legacy during formative decades of the American republic and in shaping civic values in the United States. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 325W: Classical Trad & Amer Founding

A study of the role of the Greco-Roman legacy during formative decades of the American republic and in shaping civic values in the United States. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

CL 329R: Spec Stud in Classical Culture

Topic changes to meet current interest of students and faculty. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 329RW: Spec Stud in Classical Culture

Topic changes to meet current interest of students and faculty. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

CL 351: Jews,Christians,Greeks,&Romans

Development of an integrated understanding of social, cultural, and religious interaction during the Hellenistic and Roman periods with a thematic focus. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 355: Shipwrecks, Pirates, Palaces

An exploration of the archaeological evidence for economic patterns in the ancient Mediterranean world, including the emergence of complex, hierarchized centers, long distance networks, maritime trade and predation, coinage, and slavery. Case studies range from Mesopotamia to the Roman world. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 368: Classics and Anthropology

Examination of the history of cooperative efforts between classics and anthropology, and focuses on ongoing efforts in studies of ritual and religion, kinship studies, and archaeological theory. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 368W: Classics and Anthropology

Examination of the history of cooperative efforts between classics and anthropology, and focuses on ongoing efforts in studies of ritual and religion, kinship studies, and archaeological theory. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

CL 398R: Supervised Reading

Study in Classics under the direct supervision of a faculty member for students who have completed intermediate-level coursework in Classics. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CL 411: The Evolution of Epic

Study of epic from its origin in oral song through the literate epics of Classical antiquity to contemporary poems, novels, or film. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 412: Classical & Renaissance Drama

Advanced studies in classical drama and its reception and re-imagination in Renaissance dramatic texts. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 413: Anc't Dialogue & Its Influence

Advanced study of one or more ancient dialogues and their influence in later times. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 414: Fict Romance & Their Influence

Studies in Greek and Roman fictional narratives and romances, with attention to their later influence. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 451: Greek & Latin Pastoral Poetry

Advanced study of Greek and Latin Pastoral poetry, from its origins in Theocritus to the Byzantine age. Readings include selections from Theocritus, Virgil's Eclogues, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Senecan drama, Calpurnius Siculus, Longus, and the pastoral novel. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 452: Koine New Testament & Vulgate

Advanced study of themes and topics from the Greek New Testament and the Latin Vulgate. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 453: Greek and Latin Biography

Greek and Latin Biography: Reading of one or more works by ancient biographers, with attention to historical and literary issues. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CL 487: Special Topics in Classics

Variable course topic means that supplemental topic/structure will be variable as well (options include but are not limited to film/museum/travel/lecture series/independent research/experiential learning). Alternate course to CL 329 which is variable topic without extra component. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CL 487W: Special Topics in Classics

Variable course topic means that supplemental topic/structure will be variable as well (options include but are not limited to film/museum/travel/lecture series/independent research/experiential learning). Alternate course to CL 329 which is variable topic without extra component. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

CL 495R: Honors Course

Honors research in Classics under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Open by invitation only. Credit Hours: 4.

CL 495RW: Honors Course

Honors research in Classics under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Open by invitation only. One semester of honors research can be used toward the College's Continuing Writing requirement. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

CL 498R: Supervised Reading

Credit, one to four hours. Advanced supervised study in the reading of classical literature and other aspects of classical culture. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CL 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Classics. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Comparative Literature

CPLT 110: Intro to Literary Studies

An introduction to literary studies, combined with an intensive writing approach. From the broad perspective of world literature, consideration of topics such as desire, language, and identity. Fulfills the first-year writing requirement. General Education Requirement: FWRT. Credit Hours: 4.

CPLT 190: Fresh Sem: Literature

Freshman-only seminar designed to engage students in various aspects of inquiry and research with the close guidance of a faculty member. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

CPLT 201: Reading Comparatively

This course draws on classical, modern, and contemporary texts to introduce skills required for reading comparatively across national traditions and academic disciplines with an emphasis on close reading, critical interpretation, and the multiplicity of linguistic traditions around the world. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CPLT 201W: Reading Comparatively

This course draws on classical, modern, and contemporary texts to introduce skills required for reading comparatively across national traditions and academic disciplines with an emphasis on close reading, critical interpretation, and the multiplicity of linguistic traditions around the world. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CPLT 202: Literatures, Genres, Media

This course introduces students to the way translation between different literatures, literary genres, and new media impacts our comparative reading of texts. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CPLT 202W: Literatures, Genres, Media

This course introduces students to the way translation between different literatures, literary genres, and new media impacts our comparative reading of texts. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CPLT 301: Methods of Lit.Interpretation

An introduction to a specific method of literary criticism or theoretical approach as applied through close textual interpretations. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CPLT 301W: Methods of Lit.Interpretation

An introduction to a specific method of literary criticism or theoretical approach as applied through close textual interpretations. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CPLT 302: Literary Theory

Learning to read literature from a theoretical viewpoint, its formal properties, distinctive features, origins, purposes, and mode of existence; representative critics and schools from contemporary and earlier periods. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CPLT 302W: Literary Theory

Learning to read literature from a theoretical viewpoint, its formal properties, distinctive features, origins, purposes, and mode of existence; representative critics and schools from contemporary and earlier periods. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CPLT 333: Literature & Other Disciplines

A study of literary texts and their complex interplay with other disciplines (e.g., literature and psychoanalysis, literature and philosophy, literature and law, and literature and religion.). General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CPLT 333W: Literature & Other Disciplines

A study of literary texts and their complex interplay with other disciplines (e.g., literature and psychoanalysis, literature and philosophy, literature and law, and literature and religion.). General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CPLT 369: Modern World Literatures

Modern literatures form around the world taught in a comparative or global framework. Course may be repeated when topic changes. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-3.

CPLT 369W: Modern World Literatures

Modern literatures form around the world taught in a comparative or global framework. Course may be repeated when topic changes. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CPLT 389: Special Topics: Literature

Lively topical or theoretical approaches to a given set of literary texts or problems. May be repeated for credit when subject varies.. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CPLT 389W: Special Topics: Literature

Lively topical or theoretical approaches to a given set of literary texts or problems. May be repeated for credit when subject varies. Fulfills the post-freshman writing requirement. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

CPLT 489: Advanced Special Topics

This course is designed to give advanced students the opportunity to investigate intensively an area of special interest. A reading knowledge of one foreign language is prerequisite. Topics may vary, but the goal of the course remains unchanged: the courses focuses on contemporary literary theory. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CPLT 489W: Advanced Special Topics

This course is designed to give advanced students the opportunity to investigate intensively an area of special interest. A reading knowledge of one foreign language is prerequisite. Topics may vary, but the goal of the course remains unchanged: the courses focuses on contemporary literary theory. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

CPLT 490: Lit. Proseminar for Majors

A seminar devoted to the intensive close reading of literary and other texts. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

CPLT 490W: Lit. Proseminar for Majors

A seminar devoted to the intensive close reading of literary and other texts. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

CPLT 495R: Honors Thesis

Prerequisite: approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Open to candidates for honors in their senior year. Credit Hours: 3.

CPLT 495RW: Honors Thesis

Prerequisite: approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Open to candidates for honors in their senior year. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

CPLT 497R: Supervised Reading

Directed studies of special topics in literature. Open to students with consent of instructor and approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CPLT 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Comparative Literature. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Computer Science

CS 110: Computer Science Fundamentals

A general introduction to computer science including an overview of hardware systems, programming essentials, algorithm design, data handling, and networking. Not intended for students needing a programming background for further work in computer science. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3.

CS 130R: Selected Programming Languages

Introductory course in a rotating series of computer languages. Please see current atlas for language offering. Credit Hours: 2.

CS 153: Computing for Bioinformatics

An introduction to tools of computer science that are relevant to bioinformatics, with a focus on fundamental problems with sequence data. Practical topics will include Python programming, data management, and web services. Computational concepts are emphasized with examples from underlying biology. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

CS 155: Intro to Business Computing

Intro to tools and concepts of computer science most relevant to business (enterprise) computing and e-commerce. An intro to basic programming principles, page layout and visual interface design, client/server computing, simple techniques for accessing databases, and their algorithmic foundations. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3.

CS 170: Intro to Computer Science I

An introduction to Computer Science for students expecting to utilize serious computing in coursework, research, or employment. Emphasis is on computing concepts, programming principles, algorithm development and basic data structures, using the Java programming language and Unix operating system. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 4.

CS 171: Intro.to Computer Science II

A second course in Computer Science, focusing on intermediate programming. Emphasis is on proficiency in the use and implementation of data structures, algorithms for classical programming paradigms, and object oriented design and programming with Java. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 170 as a Prerequisite.

CS 171Z: Intro to Computer Science II

An accelerated version of the second course Computer Science for students with advanced preparation e.g. AP CS-A. Emphasis is on proficiency in the use of implementation of data structures, algorithms for classical programming paradigms, and object oriented design and programming with Java. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3.

CS 185: Topics in Computer Science

Rotating topics in computer science. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisites and co-requisites depend on the topic offered. Credit Hours: 1.

CS 190: Fresh Seminar:Computer Science

Topics will be anounced each semester when the course is offered. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

CS 224: Foundations of Comp.Science

An introductory course in the theory of Computer Science, focusing on analysis of discrete structures with applications. Emphasis is on developing familiarity with notation, computational acuity and creative problem solving skills. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 170 & MATH 111 as prereq..

CS 253: Data Structures and Algorithms

A third course in Computer Science, focusing on advanced programming. Emphasis is on mastery in the use and implementation of data structures and algorithms for classical programming paradigms, using the Java programming language and object oriented design. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 171/224 as a Prerequisite.

CS 255: Comp.Arch./Machine Level Prog.

Introductory systems course in Computer Science, with a focus on high level computer architecture and assembler programming. Emphasis is on comprehension of von Neumann computer architecture, information encoding and data representation, and assembler equivalents of high level programming constructs. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 171 as a Prerequisite.

CS 285: Topics in Computer Science

Rotating topics in computer science. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Pre and co requisites depend on the topic offered. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CS 326: Analysis of Algorithms

This course explores the formal underpinnings of computational complexity, and studies how to mathematically characterize the efficiency and running times of different computer algorithms. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 170/171/224/253 prereq..

CS 329: Computational Linguistics

This course will focus on the analysis of syntactic and semantic structures, ontologies and taxonomies, distributional semantics and discourse, as well as their applications in computational linguistics. Assignments will include advanced programming implementations. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 171 as a Prerequisite.

CS 334: Machine Learning

This course will cover the underpinnings, algorithms, and practices that enable a computer to learn. Emphasis will be on fundamental theory and algorithms in statistical machine learning, and approaches to applying machine learning in a variety of domains. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 170/171/224/253 MATH 221.

CS 350: Systems Programming

System programming topics are illustrated by the POSIX API to the Linux operating system. Topics include: file i/o, the TTY driver, window systems, processes, shared memory, message passing, semaphores, signals, and interrupt handlers. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 253 & CS 255 prerequisites.

CS 355: Advanced Computer Architecture

A second course in computer organization and architecture. Emphasis is on combinatorial and sequential circuits, advanced characteristics of CPU and memory, and micro programming. Multiprocessors, GPUs and selected parallel algorithms will be discussed. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 253 & CS 255 prerequisites.

CS 370: Computer Science Practicum

This course introduces basic concepts and techniques of software engineering, and applies these in the context of a semester-long group programming project. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 253 as prerequisite.

CS 375R: Independ. Software Development

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Credit, variable. An independent study course devoted to the development of software projects. Cannot be used to meet course requirements for a CS major. Credit Hours: 1-3.

CS 377: Database Systems

Introduction to storage hierarchies, database models, consistency, reliability, and security issues. Query languages and their implementations, efficiency considerations, and compression and encoding techniques. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 253 sz prerequisite.

CS 385: Topics in Computer Science

Rotating topics in computer science. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Pre and co requisites depend on the topic offered. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CS 424: Theory of Computing

Theory underlying computing concepts, including regular languages, pushdown automata, Turing machines, decidability of problems, time and space complexity and notions of P vs NP and NP-completeness. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 326 as prerequisite.

CS 425: Artificial Intelligence

Foundations and problems of machine intelligence, application areas, representation of knowledge, constraint processing, AI programming languages, expert systems, design of an intelligent system. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 323 as prerequisite.

CS 428: Programming Languages

Explores the theory, design, & implementation of programming languages. Topics include syntax specification, parsing, formal semantics, functional & logic programming, pattern matching, backtracking, higher-order function, lambda calculus, continuation, parameter passing, meta-circular evaluation. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 224 & CS 253 prerequisites.

CS 452: Operating Systems

The structure and organization of computer operating systems. Process, memory, and I/O management; device drivers, exception handling, and interprocess communication. Students write an operating system as a course-long project. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 350 as prerequisite.

CS 453: Computer Security

Understanding offense is key to better cyberdefense. We focus on advanced vulnerabilities, exploits and defense technologies. We teach the hacker mindset, ethics as well as C and assembly. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 350 as prerequisite.

CS 455: Intro to Computer Networking

Intro to computer networks based on internal structure using the OSI layer model. Topics include: physical layer, data link layer, the network layer (routing algorithms, IP protocol, tunneling), and transport layer (UDP and TCP protocols, NS2 network simulation). Berkeley socket and pthreads APIs. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 350 as prerequisite.

CS 456: Compiler Construction

Syntax, semantics and pragmatics of computer programming languages, lexical analysis and parsing, code generation, and optimization. Design and implementation of a semester-long compiler project for a simple imperative language. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: CS 326 as prerequisite.

CS 470: Data Mining

Data mining techniques including data pre-processing, data warehousing and management, dimension reduction, clustering, similarity search, graphical models, spatiotemporal data mining. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: CS 224 & CS 253 prerequisites.

CS 485: Topics in Computer Science

May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Pre/co-requisites vary with topic. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CS 485W: Topics in Computer Science

May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Pre/co-requisites vary with topic. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

CS 495R: Honors

Enrollment limited to departmental majors invited to participate in the Honors Program. Credit Hours: 1-4.

CS 495RW: Honors

Enrollment limited to departmental majors invited to participate in the Honors Program. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

CS 497R: Directed Study

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Cannot be used to meet course requirements for a CS major or minor. Credit Hours: 1-3.

CS 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Computer Science. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Dance

DANC 121R: Ballet Dance I

This course is designed for students with no or very minimal experience in ballet technique. Ballet I introduces students to the basic skills and terminology of ballet. The course includes barre exercises with an emphasis on alignment. Center work will include adagio, tendu, basic turns, petite allegro, and grande allegro in simple combinations. The course is designed to develop individual body awareness, strength, flexibility, and an appreciation of the art of ballet. May be taken up to three times for credit. Students are required to take this course at least two times before progressing to the next level and should secure the permission of the instructor before doing so. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1.

DANC 123R: Contemporary Modern Dance I

This course is designed for students with no or minimal dance experience. It introduces dance technique and contemporary modern dance vocabulary. Emphasis will be placed on dynamic alignment, sensing and activating weight, developing coordination, and discovering body connections. Movement explorations take place on the floor, standing, and in sequences locomoting through space. Creative expression and musicality are integrated into class content. May be taken up to three times for credit. Students are required to take this course three times before progressing to the next level and should secure the permission of the instructor before doing so. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1.

DANC 124R: Jazz Dance I

This course is designed for students with no or very minimal jazz dance experience. The course provides an introduction to articulating and expressing rhythms through stylized movement sequences, basic technical skills, and performance. Emphasis is on development of greater body awareness, strength, flexibility, coordination, musicality (especially syncopation), and improvisation. May be taken up to three times for credit. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1.

DANC 127R: World Dance Forms

Students will study a world dance form, learning the basic techniques, movement vocabulary, and a dance or dances indicative of the form. The material will be further explored through historical, cultural and political perspectives. This course culminates in a performance or lecture demonstration. Required course for dance and movement studies majors. May be taken up to three times for credit. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1.

DANC 150R: Movement Improvisation

An investigation of your body's potential to move without preconception. Explorations in a variety of improvisational forms emphasize group interplay, problem-solving, and inner listening in order to reveal new movement vocabularies and increase kinesthetic awareness. Required course for dance and movement studies majors and minors. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1.

DANC 190: Freshman Seminar

An introductory seminar on a special topic in dance and movement studies. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

DANC 207R: Emory Dance Company

Emory Dance Company is a professionally oriented performance company that exposes students to the diverse choreographic approaches of faculty, student and guest artist work, as well as historical reconstructions. Course admission is by audition. Students gain performance techniques, collaborative skills, and often contribute to the making of original choreography as they prepare for a fully produced dance concert. Simultaneous enrollment in a dance technique class is required. In addition, students gain experience in some of the technical aspects of dance concert production. Credit hours are assigned in accordance with the number of works in which a student participates. Evaluation procedures announced in class. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1-2.

DANC 211: Tango: Argentina's Art Form

This course for music and dance students to study Argentine tango in Buenos Aires will intersect scholarly studies of tango history and culture with performance practice. It will provide an authentic, holistic learning experience for students to understand how theory and practice inform each other. Music and dance majors and minors only, or by permission of instructor with letter of recommendation by a music or dance professor. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

DANC 220: Hist.of Western Concert Dance

This course traces the development of Western concert dance from 19th century Romantic Ballet to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the development of American modern dance, post modern dance, and current trends and dance artists. This course is required for all dance and movement studies majors and minors. Students wishing to enroll must be a declared dance and movement studies major or minor, or obtain permission of the instructor. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

DANC 221R: Ballet Dance II

This course is designed for students who can demonstrate an understanding of and familiarity with basic ballet vocabulary. Includes barre exercises with a continued emphasis on alignment. Center work will include adagio, tendu, turns, petite allegro, and grande allegro in simple combinations. The course is designed to develop individual body awareness, strength, flexibility, musicality, and an appreciation of the art of ballet. At least 2-3 semesters in Ballet I and consultation with the instructor are required before entry into this course. May be taken up to three times for credit. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1.

DANC 223R: Contemporary Modern Dance II

This course builds on the technical skills introduced in Dance 123R. Emphasis is placed on centering, core support, breath support, full articulation of the body in three-dimensional space, fully integrating concepts of parallel and rotation, and the interplay of stability and mobility. At least three semesters in the Contemporary Modern Dance I and consultation with instructor is required before entry into this course. May be taken up to three times for credit. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1.

DANC 224R: Jazz Dance II

This course includes further development of skills introduced in Jazz Dance I with greater emphasis on style, performance, and technique. More technically challenging movement sequences will be introduced and students will be expected to individualize movement at a beginner/intermediate level. May be taken up to three times for credit. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1.

DANC 226: Topics in Somatic Practices

Somatic movement education builds a relationship between the body and mind by guiding the mover through a process of full body integration. A variety of somatic practices may be covered, including Bartenieff Fundamentals, Iyengar-based yoga, and Gyrokinesis movement training. Somatic practices can be applied to everyday activities and performance, affecting levels of confidence and encouraging authenticity. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1-4.

DANC 229: Introduction to Dance

Introduction to Dance is an overview of dance as an expressive art form, a symbolic language, and an integral aspect of world cultures. The course is designed to help students grasp a range of cultural, aesthetic, and bodily worlds from which dance is born. Course work enables students to develop intuitive and verbal skills which allow them to articulate about movement and its meaning. This is supported by direct physical experience in various dance forms, styles, genres, and through exploring the creative process. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

DANC 230: Principles of Design

A theoretical and practical understanding of the process involved in conceiving and executing a stage design and the interrelationship of the various design disciplines. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

DANC 240: Dance Literacy

This course will provide a framework for observing, analyzing, notating, and understanding movement as an expressive, communicative form. Movement literacy skills are demonstrated through the body by building relationships between Body, Space, Shape, and Effort. By utilizing Rudolph Laban's Movement Analysis system (LMA), emphasis is placed on embodying movement intention and discovering context and meaning in stylistic patterns of movement. Required course for dance and movement studies majors. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

DANC 250: Choreography I

This is a dance composition course designed to allow the student to discover new ideas about movement in a nurturing and experimental environment. Students develop and perform solo studies with an emphasis placed on the development of personal movement vocabulary, phrase building, and the exploration of choreographic tools. Discussion, critiquing, and descriptive writing about their choreographic processes will supplement direct physical work. Required course for dance and movement studies majors and minors. Must be a declared dance and movement studies major or minor, or permission of instructor. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: DANCE 150 as a Prerequisite.

DANC 321R: Ballet Dance III

This course continues to reinforce and build upon the skills learned in Ballet II. More emphasis is placed on style and execution of movement at an intermediate level. Movement sequences become more intricate. A more extensive movement vocabulary is introduced. At least 2-3 semesters in Ballet II and consultation with the instructor are required before enrolling in this course. May be taken up to six times for credit. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1.

DANC 323R: Contemporary Modern Dance III

This course is designed for students who are ready to deepen technical practices. Emphasis is placed on the student's technical proficiency and versatility. This course encourages intermediate students to become articulate performers by developing groundedness, musicality, sophisticated use of three-dimensional space, partnering, and ensemble work. Consultation with instructor is required before enrolling in this course. May be taken up to three times for credit. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1.

DANC 324R: Jazz Dance III

This course includes further development of skills introduced in Jazz Dance II with greater emphasis on style, performance and technique. More technically challenging movement sequences will be introduced and students will be expected to individualize movement at an advanced level. Course material may include components of Broadway, lyrical, hip hop and other entertainment-based dance forms. May be taken up to three times for credit. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1.

DANC 329: Contemp. Issues in Perf. Arts

When taught by Dance faculty, this course examines the practical, aesthetic, and current issues of the performing arts as a profession. When taught by Theater Studies, the course focuses on contemporary theater trends, including artistic movements and social issues. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

DANC 330: Dance Pedagogy

This course develops communicative, leadership, and creative skills while preparing the student for his/her role as a dance educator. Movement is developed as a kinesthetic tool for learning. Content includes the history of dance education, educational theories, development of original lesson plans, and practical teaching experiences in the Atlanta community. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

DANC 340: Arts Writing & Criticism

This course will be conducted as a professional workshop. During the semester students will be required to produce a series of critical articles covering a wide spectrum of fields from music to books, to dance, to theater and the visual arts. Class sessions and assignments will be devoted to nurturing the requisite skills needed to become a successful reviewer or critic. The seminar will include talks by faculty from Journalism, Dance, Music and Theater Studies, as well as visiting professional critics. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

DANC 340W: Arts Writing & Criticism

This course will be conducted as a professional workshop. During the semester students will be required to produce a series of critical articles covering a wide spectrum of fields from music to books, to dance, to theater and the visual arts. Class sessions and assignments will be devoted to nurturing the requisite skills needed to become a successful reviewer or critic. The seminar will include talks by faculty from Journalism, Dance, Music and Theater Studies, as well as visiting professional critics. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

DANC 350: Choreography II

Students will utilize skills acquired in Choreography I. Choreography II emphasizes deeper exploration and understanding of the elements of space, time, and energy in group works. This course meets twice a week, with an additional evening lab for viewing and critiquing works in progress. Students participate in many aspects of the production process. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 5. Requisites: DANCE 250 as a Prerequisite.

DANC 360R: Choreographic Laboratory

This course supports students who are continuing to create original choreographic work for the Emory Dance Company after successfully completing Choreography I and II. The lab is designed to provide ongoing feedback during the creative process. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: DANCE 350 as a Prerequisite.

DANC 385: Spec Topics:Dance&Mvmnt Studie

Course based on selected topics in dance or movement studies. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

DANC 385W: Spec Topics:Dance&Mvmnt Studie

Course based on selected topics in dance or movement studies. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

DANC 421R: Ballet Dance IV

This course continues to reinforce and build upon the skills learned in Dance 321R. More emphasis is placed on style and execution. Combinations increase in intricacy and a larger dance movement vocabulary is introduced. Course work may include pointe work and variations. At least two semesters in Ballet III and consultation with the instructor are required before enrolling in this course. May be taken up to nine times for credit. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1.

DANC 423R: Contemporary Modern Dance IV

Designed for advance dance students who can demonstrate a consistent repertoire of technical skill absent of fundamental body issues. Class material challenges the student's technical and performance range and develops a sophisticated understanding of movement concepts. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 2.

DANC 424R: Jazz Dance IV

This course is designed for advanced dancers who demonstrate consistent technical knowledge within the jazz dance genre. Class material will range in style from broadway to contemporary. General Education Requirement: PED. Credit Hours: 1.

DANC 491R: Special Projects: Performance

Provides students with an opportunity to explore individually designed performance projects or perform in honors projects under faculty supervision and evaluation. May be repeated for credit when project varies. Credit Hours: 1-2.

DANC 492R: Spec Proj:Technical Production

Provides students with an opportunity to explore individually designed technical production projects in dance under faculty supervision. May be repeated for credit when project varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

DANC 493R: Spec Proj:Hist/Theoreticl Rsch

Provides students with an opportunity to explore individually designed historical and/or theoretical research projects under faculty supervision. May be repeated for credit when project varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

DANC 494R: Special Projects: Internship

Provides students with an opportunity to explore individually designed internship projects under faculty supervision. May be repeated for credit when project varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

DANC 495A: Honors Thesis

Must be taken in addition to the major requirements. Open by permission to candidates for honors in their senior year. Credit Hours: 1-4.

DANC 495B: Honors Thesis

Must be taken in addition to the major requirements. Open by permission to candidates for honors in their senior year. Credit Hours: 1-8.

DANC 495BW: Honors Thesis

Must be taken in addition to the major requirements. Open by permission to candidates for honors in their senior year. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

DANC 496R: Special: Studio/Teaching Asst

This course provides students with an opportunity to explore individually designed pedagogical projects in dance under faculty supervision. Credit Hours: 1-4.

DANC 497R: Special Projects: Choreography

Provides students with an opportunity to explore individually designed choreographic projects under faculty supervision. May be repeated for credit when project varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

DANC 499R: Spec Proj:Danc & Movemnt Stud

Provides students with an opportunity to explore individually designed projects under faculty supervision and evaluation. May be repeated for credit when project varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

DANC 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Dance. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Dutch

DUTCH 101: Elementary Dutch I

An introduction to the fundamentals of the Dutch language. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 1-4.

DUTCH 102: Elementary Dutch II

An introduction to the fundamentals of the Dutch language. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 1-4.

East Asian Studies

EAS 190: Freshmen Seminar

Focus on selected topics in East Asian studies. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 210R: Chinese Calligraphy

Students will gain basic knowledge of how to write and appreciate East Asian brush calligraphy. Topics include: materials and tools, structure of characters, history and development of styles, the importance of calligraphy in East Asia, and the basic strokes of standard style. Credit Hours: 1.

EAS 212: Asian Religious Traditions

Thematic study of at least two Asian religious traditions. Thematic emphasis may include relationships of text and context, pilgrimage, gender, epic performance, religious institutions, visual arts, or colonial and post-colonial identities. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 215: Chn.ArtCultSoc thr Calligraphy

This course introduces students to Chinese calligraphy in its artistic, cultural and historical contexts. Combining systematic hands-on practice with reading, writing, and research, it engages students in examining the aesthetic values, intellectual metaphors, and moral criteria that calligraphy embodies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 216: East Asian Calligraphy

Studies East Asian calligraphy in artistic, cultural, and historical contexts, starting with the immediate aspects of calligraphy as a traditional art form, and then reaching beyond the classically defined discipline to examine its aesthetic values, intellectual metaphors, and moral criteria. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 216W: East Asian Calligraphy

Studies East Asian calligraphy in artistic, cultural, and historical contexts, starting with the immediate aspects of calligraphy as a traditional art form, and then reaching beyond the classically defined discipline to examine its aesthetic values, intellectual metaphors, and moral criteria. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 232: Chinese:How Hast Thou Changed

"This course introduces the development of Chinese language from proto Sino-Tibetan roots to modern standard Chinese, and presents the chronological changes in syntax and phonology. We will discuss key historical stages in Chinese developments, and analyze it from the view of linguistics aspects.". General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 232W: Chinese:How Hast Thou Changed

General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 235: Chinese Writ. Systems in Asia

This course examines the manners and contexts in which the Chinese writing systems interface with other languages and cultures (Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) and the cultural identities that the Chinese orthographic symbols come to represent at both personal and social levels in and beyond Asia. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 235W: Chinese Writ. Systems in Asia

This course examines the manners and contexts in which the Chinese writing systems interface with other languages and cultures (Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) and the cultural identities that the Chinese orthographic symbols come to represent at both personal and social levels in and beyond Asia. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 250: Intro to East Asian Studies

Required for East Asian Studies Majors and Minors. An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to major topics and methodologies in East Asian Studies, with an emphasis on writing, research, and critical thinking. Themes include history, literature, religion, and the arts. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 250W: Intro to East Asian Studies

Required for East Asian Studies Majors and Minors. An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to major topics and methodologies in East Asian Studies, with an emphasis on writing, research, and critical thinking. Themes include history, literature, religion, and the arts. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 260: East Asia: 1500 to Present

This course will emphasize transnational aspects of East Asian history, focusing on how the East Asian international system interacted with Southeast Asia, South Asia, Inner Asia, as well as with Europe and the U.S. from 1500 to the present. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 270: Intro to Japanese Culture

This course explores various aspects of life and society in Japan, including writing, gender, memory and history, geography and the environment, aesthetics, and the formation of national identity. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 270W: Intro to Japanese Culture

This course explores various aspects of life and society in Japan, including writing, gender, memory and history, geography and the environment, aesthetics, and the formation of national identity. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 271: Modern China in Film & Fiction

This course is an examination of twentieth-century Chinese society through cinematic productions and a critical reading of the writings of major Chinese writers in translation. Emphasis on self and society in a changing culture and the nature and function of literature in modern nation-building. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 271W: Mod China in Film and Fiction

This course is an examination of twentieth-century Chinese society through cinematic productions and a critical reading of the writings of major Chinese writers in translation. Emphasis on self and society in a changing culture and the nature and function of literature in modern nation-building. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 272: Lit.in Early & Imperial China

This course is an examination of twentieth-century Chinese society through cinematic productions and a critical reading of the writings of major Chinese writers in translation. Emphasis on self and society in a changing culture and the nature and function of literature in modern nation-building. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 272W: Lit. in Early & Imperial China

This course is an examination of twentieth-century Chinese society through cinematic productions and a critical reading of the writings of major Chinese writers in translation. Emphasis on self and society in a changing culture and the nature and function of literature in modern nation-building. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 273: The Heritage of China

This course is a general introduction to Chinese history, culture and literary tradition. It is designed to acquaint the students to ideas, institutions, aspects of life, literature and arts that are essential to an educated understanding of the Chinese world. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 275: Nature and Culture in Japan

We examine the interaction between the human and natural world in Japanese cultural and scientific history by looking at maps, literature, scriptures, visual media, and current journalism. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 276: Making of Modern Korea

By drawing on a wide range of materials across various disciplines the course aims to provide a broad and coherent picture of the history of modern Korea since the late 19th century to the contemporary period. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 277: Political Change in Korea

This course explores the historical dynamics of political change in Korea since the establishment of the First Republic up to the current period, the many factors that shaped its political trajectory and democratization, and the key issues that have defined South Korean politics to this day. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 278: Revolutions & Republics: China

Spanning the period that covers the First Sino-Japanese War (1895) through present, this course will explore the major transformations reshaping and reinventing cultural, political, and economic life in China through the shifting meanings of "revolution" and "republic.". General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 279W: Post-Mao? China After 1976

This course introduces students to the history, culture, society, and politics of China since 1976 through an exploration of the continuities and discontinuities knitting pre and post 1976 China. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 303: Reading Literature in Japanese

This class helps students develop the skills necessary to read Japanese-language texts without the aid of an instructor. Assignments emphasize vocabulary building and kanji recognition, strategies for decoding complex sentence structures, and the nuances of language and literary style. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 317: East Asian Buddhism

The development of Buddhism in China and Japan, including examination of monasticism, ritual, ideas of Buddhahood, Zen, Pure Land, and Buddhist relations to the state and to other religions. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 319: Chinese Drama

The course is an introduction to traditional Chinese drama, from the13th to the 20th century. We will focus on drama as literature but we will also explore the social, material, and performative dimensions of theater, including modern-day stage adaptations of traditional plays. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 319W: Chinese Drama

The course is an introduction to traditional Chinese drama, from the 13th to the 20th century. We will focus on drama as literature but we will also explore the social, material, and performative dimensions of theater, including modern-day stage adaptations of traditional plays. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 322: Politics of Southeast Asia

Suggested prerequisite: POLS 110 or 120. Intro to the contemporary politics of SE Asia. Focus on capitalist developing countries of the region - Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore. Approach is comparative, with focus on democratization, economic growth, and environmental issues. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 328: Politics of Japan & East Asia

Suggested prerequisite: Political Science 110 or 120. Examines politics of contemporary Japan, with stress on political bases of Japanese economic growth and in comparison with other East Asian economic successes (e.g., Taiwan, South Korea). General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 335: Chinese Lang,Culture & Soc.

Examines the intersection of language, culture, and society in modern China. Investigates the linguistic construction of social identities based on gender, ethnicity, age, power relation, and other factors, and ideologies that shape language use in China and in the global Chinese diaspora. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 335W: Chinese Lang,Culture & Soc.

Examines the intersection of language, culture, and society in modern China. Investigates the linguistic construction of social identities based on gender, ethnicity, age, power relation, and other factors, and ideologies that shape language use in China and in the global Chinese diaspora. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 337: Religion Health and Healing

This class explores issues such as what makes for a healthy self or person, the role of religious practices and belief in healing, and the relationship of body and mind. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 350: East Asian Martial Arts

East Asian martial arts are often portrayed as ancient, timeless, and even mystical, but they have a history. In this course we explore how military techniques intended for use in war, policing, and banditry came to be practiced as methods of moral, spiritual, and physical self-cultivation. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 350W: East Asian Martial Arts

East Asian martial arts are often portrayed as ancient, timeless, and even mystical, but they have a history. In this course we explore how military techniques intended for use in war, policing, and banditry came to be practiced as methods of moral, spiritual, and physical self-cultivation. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 358: War and Chinese Society

How did war transform Chinese society? From 1937-1949, China was engulfed in war. Using a wide range of primary and secondary sources, we explore both the major players and problems in wartime China, as well as the longterm social and cultural implications of war and society. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 358W: War and Chinese Society

How did war transform Chinese society? From 1937-1949, China was engulfed in war. Using a wide range of primary and secondary sources, we explore both the major players and problems in wartime China, as well as the longterm social and cultural implications of war and society. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 359: Women and Religion in China

This course will examine the impacts of Confucianism, Taoism and Mahayana Buddhism in shaping the social experiences, roles and images of women in twentieth-century China and Taiwan. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 359W: Women and Religion in China

This course will examine the impacts of Confucianism, Taoism and Mahayana Buddhism in shaping the social experiences, roles and images of women in twentieth-century China and Taiwan. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 360: Mod.Chn.Women in Film & Fict.

An examination of woman as a trope in Chinese literature and cinema. It explores how "woman" became a cultural construct and how that construct has redefined gender roles and femininity in changing historical contexts from pre-modern to modern Eras. All readings are in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 360W: Mod.Chn.Women in Film & Fict.

An examination of woman as a trope in Chinese literature and cinema. It explores how "woman" became a cultural construct and how that construct has redefined gender roles and femininity in changing historical contexts from pre-modern to modern Eras. All readings are in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 361: Genji: Sensuality & Salvation

This course will use the text of the Tale of Genji as a centerpoint from which to explore various issues in poetry, aesthetics, the visual arts, religion, history, politics, and gender in Japanese cultural history. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 361W: Genji: Sensuality & Salvation

This course will use the text of the Tale of Genji as a centerpoint from which to explore various issues in poetry, aesthetics, the visual arts, religion, history, politics, and gender in Japanese cultural history. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 362: Samurai,Shogun & Women Warrior

An examination of the image of the warrior in Japan through literature and its effect on many areas of Japanese culture, including philosophy, literary history, religion, music, and the visual arts. Emphasis is on the exploration of primary texts. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 362W: Samurai,Shogun & Women Warrior

An examination of the image of the warrior in Japan through literature and its effect on many areas of Japanese culture, including philosophy, literary history, religion, music, and the visual arts. Emphasis is on the exploration of primary texts. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 363: Lit & Visual Culture in Japan

An exploration of the complex interactions between written texts and the visual arts in Japan from the classical era to the present. Discussion will include prose, poetry, printing, picture scrolls, calligraphy, woodblock prints, and film. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 363W: Lit & Visual Culture in Japan

An exploration of the complex interactions between written texts and the visual arts in Japan from the classical era to the present. Discussion will include prose, poetry, printing, picture scrolls, calligraphy, woodblock prints, and film. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 364: Mod Jpn Lit In Engl Translatn

Surveys Japanese literature from the mid-19th century to the present. Introduces the nature and range of literary genres as they developed in the context of Japan's confrontation with modernity. The course opens for discussion issues in contemporary literary theory in order to understand aspects of Japanese literature and culture, such as gender, nationalism, intertextuality, Orientalism, and identity. Texts are in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 364W: Mod Jpn Lit in Engl Translatn

Surveys Japanese literature from the mid-19th century to the present. Introduces the nature and range of literary genres as they developed in the context of Japan's confrontation with modernity. The course opens for discussion issues in contemporary literary theory in order to understand aspects of Japanese literature and culture, such as gender, nationalism, intertextuality, Orientalism, and identity. Texts are in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 365: Lit & Cult Late Imperial China

This course offers an introduction to the culture and literature of late imperial China. We will discuss a wide selection of literary works from the late 16th to 18th centuries as a prism to reflect on the broader intellectual, social, and cultural history of the period. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 365W: Lit & Cult Late Imperial China

This course offers an introduction to the culture and literature of late imperial China. We will discuss a wide selection of literary works from the late 16th to 18th centuries as a prism to reflect on the broader intellectual, social, and cultural history of the period. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 366: Beyond Orientalism

This course examines the main tenets of Orientalism and exoticism in exploring the hybridization of cultural practices in musical, theatrical, and cinematographic genres from the eighteenth century to the present. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 366W: Beyond Orientalism

This course examines the main tenets of Orientalism and exoticism in exploring the hybridization of cultural practices in musical, theatrical, and cinematographic genres from the eighteenth century to the present. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 367: Japanese Modern Women Writers

This course familiarizes students with the multiplicity of the female voices that (re-)emerged in Japanese literature from the Meiji period (beginning 1868) to the late twentieth century. Texts are in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 367W: Japanese Modern Women Writers

This course familiarizes students with the multiplicity of the female voices that (re-)emerged in Japanese literature from the Meiji period (beginning 1868) to the late twentieth century. Texts are in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 368: Writing Women in Trad.China

This course surveys the rich and varied tradition of women's literature that developed throughout imperial Chinese history (roughly from the 1st c. AD to the early 20th c.). General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 368W: Writing Women in Trad.China

This course surveys the rich and varied tradition of women's literature that developed throughout imperial Chinese history (roughly from the 1st c. AD to the early 20th c.). General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 369: Chinese Music & Culture

Open to all students regardless of Chinese language ability, basic language skills will be taught. This course examines the historical, social, and individual aspects of Chinese musical cultures through the use of English and Chinese sources. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 369W: Chinese Music & Culture

Open to all students regardless of Chinese language ability, basic language skills will be taught. This course examines the historical, social, and individual aspects of Chinese musical cultures through the use of English and Chinese sources. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 371: East Asian Musical Cultures

This course explores how music creates differences between countries in East Asia and, at the same time, ties them together to create a distinct East Asian identity. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 371W: East Asian Musical Cultures

This course explores how music creates differences between countries in East Asia and, at the same time, ties them together to create a distinct East Asian identity. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 372: History of Modern Japan

An introductory survey of modern Japan (1850-1950), covering the late Tokugawa shogunate, the creation of the Meiji state, and the rise and fall of the Japanese empire. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 373: The Political Economy of China

This course covers the economic and political systems in the People??s Republic of China. It first presents a history of their coevolution, and then examines different sectors in depth, including the opportunities and challenges involved, for Chinese leadership, people, and the world. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 & ECON 112 as prereq..

EAS 374: Confucian Classics

Confucian Classics shaped Chinese literati culture from late antiquity to the early 20th century. The goal of this course is to illustrate the diversity of literary and cultural practices that evolved around Confucius' unique body of writings (551 - 479 BC). Knowledge of Chinese is not necessary. . General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 374W: Confucian Classics

Confucian Classics shaped Chinese literati culture from late antiquity to the early 20th century. The goal of this course is to illustrate the diversity of literary and cultural practices that evolved around Confucius' unique body of writings (551 - 479 BC). Knowledge of Chinese is not necessary. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 375: Contemp. Chinese Politics

Examines contemporary Chinese politics, covering regime institutions and processes, policies and their effects, and the dynamics of political development, including Chinese Communist party and central government, as well as the role of subnational government. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 377: Jpn Lit: Read & Wrt Classics

A survey of Japanese literature in translation from the 8th through the 21st centuries in which students both read representative works from various genres in the Japanese canon and write in those genres themselves. Texts are in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 377W: Jpn Lit: Read & Wrt Classics

A survey of Japanese literature in translation from the 8th through the 21st centuries in which students both read representative works from various genres in the Japanese canon and write in those genres themselves. Texts are in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 378: Postwar JPN Through Its Media

This course examines the postwar Japanese experience through film, television, magazines, newspapers, music, and manga. We will explore the ways in which Japanese society has narrated its experiences of recovery after World War II, and the role these media sources have played in this reconstruction. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 378W: Postwar JPN Through Its Media

This course examines the way the postwar Japanese experience has been reflected (and constructed) through various types of popular media. Through film, television, magazine, newspapers, music, and manga, we will explore the various ways in which Japanese society has narrated its experiences of recovery and rebuilding after World War II, and the role these media sources have played in this reconstruction. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 379: History of Modern China

China since the Opium War. Nineteenth-century dynastic decline, Western impact, and modernization efforts; Republican, Nationalist, and Communist revolutions of the twentieth century; and the development of the People's Republic of China since 1949. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 380: Social Movement, East & West

This course examines social movements in the East and West from a comparative perspective. The goal is to better understand the varying cultural, historical and institutional contexts and dynamics through which social movements emerge, evolve and leave traces. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 380W: Social Movement, East & West

This course examines social movements in the East and West from a comparative perspective. The goal is to better understand the varying cultural, historical and institutional contexts and dynamics through which social movements emerge, evolve and leave traces. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 382: Two Koreas

This course explores the origins of Korea's division system, the developmental path or each Korea, as well as the contemporary events that have been at the center of international debates, thereby challenging students to rethink the conventional framework based on binaries. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 385: Spec Top: East Asian Studies

Study of East Asian literature, history, society, thought, or culture, alone or in conjunction with other literary or cultural trends. Topics to be announced in advance. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

EAS 385W: Spec Top: East Asian Studies

Study of East Asian literature, history, society, thought, or culture, alone or in conjunction with other literary or cultural trends. Topics to be announced in advance. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

EAS 386: Special Topics: Korean

An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to Korean culture and society. No knowledge of Korean is required. Topics to be announced each semester. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

EAS 386W: Special Topics: Korean

An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to Korean culture and society. No knowledge of Korean is required. Topics to be announced each semester. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

EAS 388: The Cultural Revolution

A survey of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966 - 1976). Students will study revolutionary songs, films, and model plays, in addition to the visual and material culture of the period. Students will also stage a performance of Taking Tiger Mountain by Strategy. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 388W: The Cultural Revolution

A survey of the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966 - 1976). Students will study revolutionary songs, films, and model plays, in addition to the visual and material culture of the period. Students will also stage a performance of Taking Tiger Mountain by Strategy. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 5.

EAS 394: Screening China

The course explores the history and development of Chinese cinema. It discusses "film in China" and "China in film" by focusing on the function of cinema and reconfigurations of time, space, gender, and history in Chinese films under different historical conditions since the early twentieth century. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 394W: Screening China

The course explores the history and development of Chinese cinema. It discusses "film in China" and "China in film" by focusing on the function of cinema and reconfigurations of time, space, gender, and history in Chinese films under different historical conditions since the early twentieth century. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 397R: Directed Reading

Directed reading. Credit Hours: 1-8.

EAS 404: Contemp. Chinese Literature

This course enhances students' Chinese proficiency at the advanced level and understanding of the Chinese society through close reading and discussion of expository writings and short fictional pieces. Prerequisites: CHN402 for students in the non-heritage track; CHN303 in the heritage track. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 425: Food and Culture in East Asia

In this course, we will place food under analytic scrutiny and explore the variegated histories of food in East Asia. We will interrogate the different ways of imagining, understanding, and defining Asian foods and explore how human relationships to food in East Asia have changed over time. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 425W: Food and Culture in East Asia

In this course, we will place food under analytic scrutiny and explore the variegated histories of food in East Asia. We will interrogate the different ways of imagining, understanding, and defining Asian foods and explore how human relationships to food in East Asia have changed over time. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 450: Seminar in East Asian Studies

Required for East Asian Studies majors. An advanced seminar probing themes in the study of East Asia. Topics may include issues in comparative colonialism, the volatility of shared meanings of identity as well as reconstructions of national subjects in literature, popular culture, and the arts. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 450W: Seminar in East Asian Studies

Required for East Asian Studies majors. An advanced seminar probing themes in the study of East Asia. Topics may include issues in comparative colonialism, the volatility of shared meanings of identity as well as reconstructions of national subjects in literature, popular culture, and the arts. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 451R: Great Writers of Modern Japan

This advanced seminar is devoted to intensive reading and discussion of fiction and essays by a single modern Japanese author who had clearly influenced contemporary Japanese culture, as well as earned international acclaim and recognition for his or her work. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 451RW: Great Writers of Modern Japan

This advanced seminar is devoted to intensive reading and discussion of fiction and essays by a single modern Japanese author who had clearly influenced contemporary Japanese culture, as well as earned international acclaim and recognition for his or her work. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 453W: China and the World

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course examines China's relations with and connections to the rest of the world, with a focus on China's relations with Europeans, focusing on the period 1400 -1911. It is a writing-intensive course, and the writing of a history research paper is the primary goal. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 454W: Global History

Jr/Sr Colloquium. Offers an introduction to the field of global history, focusing on key debates and historiographical interventions. The course also focuses on the production of a history research paper. It is recommended that students have taken at least one or two college-level history courses. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

EAS 495A: East Asian Studies Honors I

Honors program. Credit Hours: 3.

EAS 495BW: East Asian Studies Honors II

Honors program writing. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

EAS 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer credit Emory course in East Asian Studies. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Economics

ECON 101: Principles Of Microeconomics

Introduction to the theory of markets, including consumer and producer choice and how they interact to determine prices and resource allocations. Applications include price controls, production, market structures, environmental economics, governmental regulation of the economy, labor and capital markets, and international exchange. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ECON 112: Principles Of Macroeconomics

Covers current debates on the workings of the aggregate economy, including unemployment, inflation, economic growth, the national debt, financial markets, money and the banking system, and international trade. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 or BUS 201 as prereq..

ECON 190: Freshman Seminar:Economics

Open only to students with freshman standing. Topics and prerequisites vary; consult the Course Atlas. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

ECON 201: Intermediate Microeconomics

Theories of the household and of the business firm and their implications for the demand and supply of final products and productive factors and for the distribution of income. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON & MATH as prerequisite.

ECON 212: Intermediate Macroeconomics

Determination of national income, employment, and the price level; business fluctuations; and international monetary issues. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 & 112 & MATH.

ECON 215: Stocks,Bonds&Financl Markets

Introduction to the role of various financial markets in an economy. Topics include the stock market, bonds, futures, options, and other derivative assets. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 or BUS 201 as prereq..

ECON 220: Probab.& Stat. for Economists

Methods of collection, classification, analysis, and interpretation of economic data; measures of central tendency and dispersion; probability; estimation; hypothesis testing; regression analysis. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON & MATH as prerequisite.

ECON 231: Intro To Global Trade & Fin

An introduction to international trade, capital flows, and finance. Topics include the impact of public policy decisions concerning protectionism, balance of payments, and foreign exchange markets on economic activities. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 or BUS 201 as prereq..

ECON 290: Sophomore Seminar:Economics

Scheduled as needed. Variable credit; maximum credit, eight hours. An introduction to selected topics in economics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101/ECON 112 as prereq.

ECON 305: Economics of Life

Applies microeconomic theory to both market and non-market phenomena, including crime, sports, family, and sexuality. Explores facts and trends, theoretical and empirical studies, and the role of public policy. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 or BUS 201 as prereq..

ECON 305W: Economics of Life

Applies microeconomic theory to both market and non-market phenomena, including crime, sports, family, and sexuality. Explores facts and trends, theoretical and empirical studies, and the role of public policy. (May be taught as a post-freshman writing requirement). General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON 101 or BUS 201 as prereq..

ECON 309: Contemporary Economic Issues

Economic analysis and public policy. Discussion of selected issues such as the economics of discrimination, environment, medical care, cultural arts, education, and social responsibility of business. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 or BUS 201 as prereq..

ECON 309W: Contemporary Economic Issues

Economic analysis and public policy. Discussion of selected issues such as the economics of discrimination, environment, medical care, cultural arts, education, and social responsibility of business. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON 101 or BUS 201 as prereq..

ECON 310: Experimental Economics

This course covers the new and growing field of experimental economics. The term experimental economics refers to the use of the laboratory for the purpose of studying specific research questions in economics. Experiments in economics are similar in spirit to those in psychology, physics, chemistry, or biology. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON101/112/Bus 201 as prereq.

ECON 315: Economics and Psychology

This course is intended to provide an introduction to the application of psychological insights into economic models of behavior. This course will discuss the limitations of traditional economic models and will present models that are psychologically more realistic. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON101/112/Bus 201 as prereq.

ECON 320: Econometrics

Introduction to construction and testing of econometric models; analysis and critique of general linear regression model; simultaneous equations models; computer program for regression analysis; applications. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON 101/112/220 as pre-reqs.

ECON 330: Collect Bargaing/Pub Polic

Prerequisite: Economics 101. Contemporary public policy toward collective bargaining. The process of collective bargaining and administration of labor agreements, including organizing, grievance procedures, and arbitration. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 or ECON_OX 101 prer..

ECON 333: Financial Economics

We introduce the workings of financial markets and institutions. We examine several types of financial instruments, their markets, and the roles of investment banks, security brokers, hedge funds, and venture capital firms. We will learn about financial cycles and regulation of financial markets. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 112, 201,220(orMATH 361).

ECON 341: Business & Government

Government implementation, regulation, and control of business enterprises, excluding banks and insurance companies. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON101/112/Bus 201 as prereq.

ECON 355: Politcl Economy:American South

Economic history of the American South from the colonial era to the present. Topics include the development of the antebellum economy, Reconstruction, and the twentieth-century resurgence of the Southern economy. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 and BUS 201 as Prereq.

ECON 355W: Politcl Economy:American South

Economic history of the American South from the colonial era to the present. Topics include the development of the antebellum economy, Reconstruction, and the twentieth-century resurgence of the Southern economy. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON 101 and BUS 201 as Prereq.

ECON 356: Devlpmnt. of Mod U.S. Economy

Examines the post-1800 development of industrial America. Topics covered include the rise of manufacturing, banking, the labor movement, agriculture, and foreign trade. Special attention is paid to the role of the government sector in the economy. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 and BUS 201 as Prereq.

ECON 362: Economic Development

Introduction to theory of economic growth. The nature of economic development; factors influencing capital formation and technological advance; role of government in promoting development; relationship of international trade to growth; international economic policies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON101/112/Bus 201 as prereq.

ECON 363: The Political Economy of China

This course covers the economic and political systems in the People??s Republic of China. It first presents a history of their coevolution, and then examines different sectors in depth, including the opportunities and challenges involved, for Chinese leadership, people, and the world. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 & ECON 112 as prereq..

ECON 364: Latin American Economies

Analysis of the evolution of economic development and underdevelopment in Latin America; and application of development paradigms to country-specific examples. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON101/112/Bus 201 as prereq.

ECON 365: Environ Economics And Policy

Introduction to the economics of natural resources and the environment. The course will focus on major resource and environmental problems and their economic solutions. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 or BUS 201 as prereq..

ECON 366: Development Issues for Africa

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to explore issues in economic development viewed from the perspective of sub-Saharan Africa from the impact of slavery and colonialism to the modern era of globalization. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON101/112/Bus 201 as prereq.

ECON 366W: Development Issues for Africa

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to explore issues in economic development viewed from the perspective of sub-Saharan Africa from the impact of slavery and colonialism to the modern era of globalization. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON101/112/Bus 201 as prereq.

ECON 371: Health Economics

An introduction to the application of the theories and principles of microeconomics to issues in health care. Increase understanding of microeconomic theory and the basic structure of health care delivery and health care financing in the United States and other countries. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 or BUS 201 as prereq..

ECON 372: Health Care Markets

This course exams the role of the government in health and health insurance. We will examine the theoretical reasons for government intervention in health and health insurance, the related empirical evidence, how government has intervened, and the effects. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 or BUS 201 as prereq..

ECON 372W: Health Care Markets

This course exams the role of the government in health and health insurance. We will examine the theoretical reasons for government intervention in health and health insurance, the related empirical evidence, how government has intervened, and the effects. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON 101 or BUS 201 as prereq..

ECON 385: Special Topics in Economics

Selected topics in Economics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: ECON101/112/Bus 201 as prereq.

ECON 385W: Special Topics in Economics

Selected topics in Economics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5. Requisites: ECON101/112/Bus 201 as prereq.

ECON 390R: Junior Seminar:Economics

An in-depth examination of selected topics in economics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 3.

ECON 390RW: Junior Seminar:Economics

An in-depth examination of selected topics in economics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

ECON 394: Washington Econ Policy Semestr

Credit, up to sixteen semester hours. Prerequisite: nomination by department. Intensive examination of the policy making process in Washington, particularly as it relates to economic policy. Students must apply early in the semester preceding the one in which they intend to participate. Credit Hours: 1-16.

ECON 397R: Directed Reading In Economics

Up to three semester hours credit. For approval, a topic must be selected that is not included in a course to be offered before the student would normally graduate; a faculty adviser from among the full-time faculty must agree to supervise the study program, and a written description of the program must be submitted to and approved by the director of undergraduate studies in the semester preceding the one in which the student intends to participate. Credit Hours: 1-3. Requisites: ECON 101 or BUS 201 as prereq..

ECON 400: Managerial Economics

Applies economic analysis and methods to business problems, using elementary level linear programming, input/output analysis, and game theory. Traditional topics in managerial economics, such as cost and demand analysis, capital budgeting, and cost-benefit analysis. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201 as pre-reqs.

ECON 405: Industrial Organization

The competitiveness of markets related to observable firm and product characteristics. Market competition related to measures of performance, such as profitability, research and development spending, advertising, and growth. Applications to antitrust law. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201/220 as pre-reqs.

ECON 410: Topics In Macroeconomics

The course covers the microeconomic foundations of macroeconomics, the theoretical and empirical analysis of general equilibrium, and optimal monetary and fiscal policies. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: ECON 201/212 as pre-req.

ECON 410W: Topics In Macroeconomics

The course covers the microeconomic foundations of macroeconomics, the theoretical and empirical analysis of general equilibrium, and optimal monetary and fiscal policies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5. Requisites: ECON 201/212 as pre-req.

ECON 411: Money & Banking

Economics of money, credit, and banking with emphasis on factors influencing the quantity of money and effects on employment, output, and prices. Economic analysis of financial markets, financial institutions, monetary policy, and inflation. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201/212 as pre-req.

ECON 411W: Money & Banking

Economics of money, credit, and banking with emphasis on factors influencing the quantity of money and effects on employment, output, and prices. Economic analysis of financial markets, financial institutions, monetary policy, and inflation. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON 201/212 as pre-req.

ECON 415: Behavioral Economics & Finance

This course covers topics in behavioral economics and finance, including quasi-experiments and tests of market efficiency, bounded rationality and household behavior, limit of arbitrage, bubbles and crashes, social interactions, and implications of market inefficiency for corporate behavior. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 & 112 & 201 as prereq.

ECON 421: Microeconometrics

Various methodological extensions of the simple linear regression model are covered. These are geared to address discreteness, nonlinearities, heterogeneity, natural experiments, and repeated sampling usually found in microeconomic data. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ADD ECON 420 AS A PREREQUSITE.

ECON 422: Economic Forecasting

An introduction to Economics Forecasting and Time Series Analysis. The course will cover specifications and estimation of ARMA models, seasonality, non-stationarity, unit roots and forecast evaluations. Empirical applications are used throughout the course. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 420 as prerequisite.

ECON 422W: Economic Forecasting

An introduction to Economics Forecasting and Time Series Analysis. The course will cover specifications and estimation of ARMA models, seasonality, non-stationarity, unit roots and forecast evaluations. Empirical applications are used throughout the course. General Education Requirement: MQRW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON 420 as prerequisite.

ECON 423: Financial Econometrics

This course covers a range of topics in financial and time series econometrics. It provides an introduction to the properties of financial asset returns, stationary and non-stationary time series models, conditional variance models and a review of estimation and inference methods in econometrics. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 420 as prerequisite.

ECON 425: Mathematical Economics

Introduction to the use of calculus in economic analysis; comparative static problem and optimization theory; consideration of the mathematical techniques used in game theory. General Education Requirement: MQR. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: MATH 211 & ECON 201 as a Prere.

ECON 430: Economics of Labor Markets

Describes and analyzes the functioning of labor markets, the supply and demand for labor, and the determination of wages and employment. The effects of unions, institutions, and discrimination on labor markets are also considered. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201 as pre-reqs.

ECON 431: International Trade

Theory of comparative advantage; the impact of trade on welfare and income distribution; economic analysis of trade barriers; and the analysis of international movement of labor and capital. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201 as pre-reqs.

ECON 432: International Finance

Analysis of the international financial system and its effect on macroeconomic policies. Determination of exchange rates and their impact on the trade balance. International monetary institutions and proposals for reform. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201/212 as pre-req.

ECON 433: Advanced Financial Markets

This course provides an in-depth, technical study of financial markets and investments. We study measures of risk, capital allocation to risky portfolios, optimal portfolios, the capital asset pricing model, indicators of market efficiency, and valuation of various financial instruments. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 112/201/220orMATH 361.

ECON 433W: Advanced Financial Markets

This course provides an in-depth, technical study of financial markets and investments. We study measures of risk, capital allocation to risky portfolios, optimal portfolios, the capital asset pricing model, indicators of market efficiency, and valuation of various financial instruments. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON 112/201/220orMATH 361.

ECON 434: Public Finance

Principles of government finance at the national, state, and local levels. Effects of taxes, public debt policy, and government expenditures on both individual citizens and the economy as a whole. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 112 and 201.

ECON 440: Economics of Regulation

Economic rationale of regulation. Traditional regulation of monopoly and recent advances in regulatory techniques. Regulation of structurally competitive industries and occupations. Environmental, safety, and health regulation. Current issues in regulation-protectionism, rent-seeking, deregulation, and cost-benefit analysis. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201 or ECON_OX 201 prereq.

ECON 442: Law and Economics

Economic analysis of property rights, contracts, torts, and other aspects of the legal system. Legal rules will be viewed as mechanisms for allocating resources, and the efficiency of alternative legal rules is analyzed. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201 as pre-reqs.

ECON 443: Public Choice

Economic analysis of political decision making and collective action. Surveys theories of aggregating individual preferences through various property-rights and organizational structures to produce collective-choice equilibria and disequilibria, rent seeking; and constitutional construction. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201 as pre-reqs.

ECON 443W: Public Choice

Economic analysis of political decision making and collective action. Surveys theories of aggregating individual preferences through various property-rights and organizational structures to produce collective-choice equilibria and disequilibria, rent seeking; and constitutional construction. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON 201 as pre-reqs.

ECON 445: Urban Economics

Economic analysis of the urban environment covering such topics as the theories of location, land use, housing, segregation, transportation, local government, and poverty. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201 as pre-reqs.

ECON 445W: Urban Economics

Economic analysis of the urban environment covering such topics as the theories of location, land use, housing, segregation, transportation, local government, and poverty. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON 201 as pre-reqs.

ECON 446: Housing and Mortgage Markets

The spatial structure of urban real estate and housing markets; government housing and land-use controls; problems of urban transportation and environmental quality; local taxation and public expenditure. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201 as pre-reqs.

ECON 449: Economics Internship

Open to economics majors and minors only. Majors need to obtain permission from their economics advisers. Economics minors obtain permission from the director of undergraduate studies. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: ECON 201/212 and 220.

ECON 455: GrantWriting:Theory & Practice

The objective of the course is to introduce the students to the elements of grant writing both in theory and practice. Selection of topic, matching topics with funding, searching funding for research topics are emphasized. Students complete draft proposals possibly resulting in grant proposals. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201and 212 and 420/422.

ECON 465: Rsrce and Environmental Econ

This course develops the theory of resource and environmental economics and applies it to analyze real-world policy issues. It covers the economics of exhaustible and renewable resources and discusses how economic approaches can be used to control externalities and pollution. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201 as pre-reqs.

ECON 481: Neuroeconomics

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the field of neuroeconomics. Upon completion of the course, students will have a basic understanding of the tools used to study the neurobiology of decision making. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201 or NBB 301/302.

ECON 485: Advanced Topics in Economics

Advanced topics in Economics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ECON 485W: Advanced Topics in Economics

Advanced topics in Economics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ECON 487: Game Theory & Econ. Activity

This course develops a conceptual framework for understanding games played in business and in life. The ultimate goal of this course is to enhance the students?? ability to think strategically in interactive situations. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 201 as pre-reqs.

ECON 490R: Advanced Seminar: Economics

Scheduled as needed. Variable credit; maximum credit: eight hours. Prerequisite: Economics majors who have completed all specifically required courses for the major, or consent of the instructor. Preparation of exercises and reports based on current problems of economic policy; requires use of interpretation and analysis previously acquired in other economics and allied courses. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 3.

ECON 495A: Honors Seminar

By invitation only. (Economics 201, 212, and 220 recommended). For seniors majoring in economics who have exhibited exceptional interest and competence in their field. Significant economic issues selected by the department each year and not covered in the regular curriculum; topics in theory, including areas of controversy; significant books; faculty research topics. Credit Hours: 4.

ECON 495BW: Honors Research

By invitation only. Preparation of honors research project under supervision of faculty member. Students meet periodically to discuss their projects with other honors candidates and faculty members. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ECON 496R: Tutorial in Economics

Directed, intensive study using intermediate theory on a topic not covered in a course to be offered before a student would normally graduate. Students must receive departmental permission from the director of undergraduate studies in the semester preceding the one in which the student intends to participate. Credit Hours: 1-3. Requisites: ECON 201/212 as pre-req.

ECON 496RW: Tutorial in Economics

Directed, intensive study using intermediate theory on a topic not covered in a course to be offered before a student would normally graduate. Students must receive departmental permission from the director of undergraduate studies in the semester preceding the one in which the student intends to participate. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: ECON 201/212 as pre-req.

ECON 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Economics. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Emory College Seminar

ECS 100: Peer Mentoring and Leadership

A service-learning course for designated leadership and service programs at Emory. Individual offerings vary but give attention to student development theory and research and practices in higher education. Credit Hours: 1-2.

ECS 102: The Liberal Arts Edge

This course provides a framework for students to articulate how to leverage a liberal arts education as they launch their post-graduation pursuits. Through assignments focused on self-assessment and exploration, students will identify and translate skills that transfer from college to career. Credit Hours: 1.

ECS 110: Living and Learning Seminar

This is a 1-credit course taught in conjunction with a residence hall community. Topics vary by semester and introduce students to academic research related to the living & learning theme and its connection to Emory, Atlanta, and the world. Credit Hours: 1.

ECS 190: Emory College Freshman Seminar

Limited to first-year students, the topics vary based on the instructor. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

ECS 300R: Honor Council Practicum

This is a 2-credit course intended for new student members of the Emory College Honor Council. It introduces students to academic integrity as a field of research and inquiry, the historical context of college honor systems, and new research and trends concerning academic dishonesty. Credit Hours: 2.

ECS 400R: Honor Council Adv. Practicum

This is a 2-credit course intended for continuing student members of the Emory College Honor Council. Members are required to develop a project related to academic integrity and to help facilitate the general practicum, which covers new research and trends concerning academic dishonesty. Credit Hours: 2.

ECS 491: Ethics and Leadership

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop projects to work with institutions and organizations and experience real time issues surrounding Leadership, Ethics and Organizational impact in their respective fields. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

Educational Studies

EDS 472R: Curriculum Seminar

Credit Hours: 2-4.

English

ENG 101: Expository Writing

Every semester. Intensive writing course that trains students in expository writing through a number of variable topics. Satisfies first-year English writing requirement. General Education Requirement: FWRT. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 123R: Communicative Grammar

Students who speak English as an additional language will research, analyze, and practice English Grammar to develop their knowledge of form, meaning, and usage in a communicative context. Credit Hours: 1. Requisites: ENG 101 corequisite.

ENG 124: Academic Communication Skills

An Academic communication skills course designed to prepare English language learners for success at Emory and throughout their academic careers. Focus on speaking, reading, listening, and vocabulary skills through engagement with authentic materials, such as lectures and presentations. Credit Hours: 1.

ENG 150: Great Works of Literature

This course introduces students to some of the monumental works of Western civilization. It does not fulfill a writing requirement, but it does have students study classic texts from the ancient and modern worlds. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 181: Writing About Literature

Every semester. Intensive writing course that trains students in techniques of writing and literary analysis through writing about literature. Readings and format vary in different sections. Satisfies first-year English writing requirement. General Education Requirement: FWRT. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 190: Freshman Seminar:English

Every semester. Freshmen only. Through readings on variable topics, frequent writing assignments, and in-class discussions, the seminar emphasizes reasoned discourse and intellectual community. Does not satisfy first-year writing requirement. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 200R: Experiential Writing Lab

This topic course can be offered as a stand-alone course or tied to another course and will provide an opportunity for students to engage in an experiential learning opportunity through writing and reflection. Credit Hours: 1-2.

ENG 201: Multimedia Journalism

Students write and report for newspapers, radio, magazines, online sites and social media and develop websites to publish multimedia writing and news reports. They learn the basics of news writing and reporting, interviewing, and audio and video production. No journalism background required. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 201W: Multimedia Journalism

Students write and report for newspapers, radio, magazines, online sites and social media and develop websites to publish multimedia writing and news reports. They learn the basics of news writing and reporting, interviewing, and audio and video production. No journalism background required. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 202: Multiliteracy Tutor Practicum

Designed as a companion to first semester experience as a Writing Center or ESL Program Tutor. Course includes theoretical and pedagogical readings, reflection on tutoring experiences, practice in tutoring methods, discussion of rhetorical concepts, and development of tutoring-based research. Credit Hours: 1.

ENG 205: Poetry

Studies in poetry and poetic forms. Readings may vary in individual sections, but all sections emphasize critical reading and writing about poetic art. Required for English majors. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 205W: Poetry

Studies in poetry and poetic forms. Readings may vary in individual sections, but all sections emphasize critical reading and writing about poetic art. Required for English majors. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 206: Introduction to Narrative

An introduction to the study of narrative, with an emphasis on narrative fiction and the critical vocabulary used to describe it. Readings will vary by semester, and may include examples from other disciplines. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 206W: Introduction to Narrative

An introduction to the study of narrative, with an emphasis on narrative fiction and the critical vocabulary used to describe it. Readings will vary by semester, and may include examples from other disciplines. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 210: Major Authors

An introduction to one or more major authors in English literature, with an emphasis on literary merit and its determination, canon formation, literary movements, and reading strategies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 210W: Major Authors

An introduction to one or more major authors in English literature, with an emphasis on literary merit and its determination, canon formation, literary movements, and reading strategies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 211: Literature and the Arts

An exploration of the connections between literature and various other mimetic and expressive arts, including painting, film, theater, music, sculpture, architecture, and dance. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 211W: Literature and the Arts

An exploration of the connections between literature and various other mimetic and expressive arts, including painting, film, theater, music, sculpture, architecture, and dance. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 212: Readings in Pop Lit/Culture

An exploration of literary works (fiction, poetry, drama, essays) that have had or have a popular readership, and an examination of the factors governing popular taste and literary production. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 212W: Readings in Pop Lit/Culture

An exploration of literary works (fiction, poetry, drama, essays) that have had or have a popular readership, and an examination of the factors governing popular taste and literary production. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 213: Fictions of Human Desire

An inquiry into the various expressions of human desire through readings of selected works of literature. Topics may include romance, psychoanalysis, gay and lesbian studies, or the four loves, classically conceived. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 213W: Fictions of Human Desire

An inquiry into the various expressions of human desire through readings of selected works of literature. Topics may include romance, psychoanalysis, gay and lesbian studies, or the four loves, classically conceived. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 214: Global Literature in English

An exploration of Anglophone literatures from around the world. Regional focus and selection of texts will vary but may include works by Achebe, Cliff, Friel, Head, Lamming, Rushdie, Silko, Soyinka, Tan, and/or Walcott. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 214W: Global Literature In English

An exploration of Anglophone literatures from around the world. Regional focus and selection of texts will vary but may include works by Achebe, Cliff, Friel, Head, Lamming, Rushdie, Silko, Soyinka, Tan, and/or Walcott. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 215: History of Drama and Theater I

General history of the theater from its origins through the Renaissance, focusing on representative dramatic works and on the influence of actor, staging, and audience. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 216: History of Drama & Theater II

General history of the theater from French neoclassicism through the twentieth century, focusing on representative dramatic works and on the influence of actor, staging, and audience. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 220W: Rhetorical Studies

Introduction to rhetoric and rhetorical analysis. While learning rhetorical tactics of Ancient Greece and Rome, students will apply that learning to their academic and vocational goals. Practice in writing and speaking, grounded in ethics, are central to the course. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 221R: Advanced Writing Workshop

Prerequisites: English 101 or 181 and written permission of instructor. Practical introductions to various kinds of media and professional writing. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 221RW: Advanced Writing Workshop

Prerequisites: English 101 or 181 and written permission of instructor. Practical introductions to various kinds of media and professional writing. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 223: Rhetorical Grammar

Through a study and analysis of grammar's impact on rhetorical effectiveness, students work with their own writing as they learn to make and adapt grammatical choices to fit audience, purpose, constraints, exigencies, and timing. Credit Hours: 1.

ENG 250: Amer Lit:Beginnings to 1865

Readings in American literature, with attention to cultural and historical backgrounds. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 250W: Amer Lit:Beginnings to 1865

Readings in American literature, with attention to cultural and historical backgrounds. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 251: American Lit: 1865 to Present

Readings in American literature from 1865 to the present, with attention to cultural and historical backgrounds. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 251W: American Lit: 1865 to Present

Readings in American literature from 1865 to the present, with attention to cultural and historical backgrounds. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 255: British Literature Before 1660

Readings in English literature written up to 1660, with attention to cultural and historical backgrounds. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 255W: British Literature Before 1660

Readings in English literature written up to 1660, with attention to cultural and historical backgrounds. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 256: British Literature Since 1660

Readings in English literature written from 1660 to the early twentieth century, with attention to cultural and historical backgrounds. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 256W: British Literature Since 1660

Readings in English literature written from 1660 to the early twentieth century, with attention to cultural and historical backgrounds. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 258: Introduction to Irish Studies

An introduction to the themes, texts, and methodologies of Irish studies. Required for the Irish studies minor but open to all students. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 261: Survey Af-Am Lit Before 1900

An overview of African-American literature prior to 1900. Students will read and examine writings by major contributors to each period in the genres of fiction (short story and novel) essay, poetry, and narratives of enslavement. Students will write four five-page critical essays. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 261W: Survey Af-Am Lit Before 1900

An overview of African-American literature prior to 1900. Students will read and examine writings by major contributors to each period in the genres of fiction (short story and novel) essay, poetry, and narratives of enslavement. Students will write four five-page critical essays. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 262: Survey Af-Am Lit Since 1900

An overview of African-American literature since 1900. Students will read and examine writings by major contributors to each period in the genres of fiction (short story and novel) essay, poetry, and narratives of enslavement. Students will write and revise four five-page critical essays. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 262W: Survey Af-Am Lit Since 1900

An overview of African-American literature since 1900. Students will read and examine writings by major contributors to each period in the genres of fiction (short story and novel) essay, poetry, and narratives of enslavement. Students will write and revise four five-page critical essays. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 268R: Intro to British Studies

This course offers a structured introduction to the history and cultre of the United Kingdom, including its political, architectural, literary and environmental context . Credit Hours: 1-2.

ENG 300: Old Eng Language & Literature

Introduction to the Old English language and readings of representative prose and poetry. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 300W: Old Eng Language & Literature

Introduction to the Old English language and readings of representative prose and poetry. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 301: Beowulf

The earliest English epic, read in the original language. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 301W: Beowulf

The earliest English epic, read in the original language. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 302: Technical Writing

This writing-intensive course provides students with practice developing rhetorically effective and ethically sensitive communication in genres that characterize professional activity across and outside the university. No prior technical knowledge required. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 302W: Technical Writing

This writing-intensive course provides students with practice developing rhetorically effective and ethically sensitive communication in genres that characterize professional activity across and outside the university. No prior technical knowledge required. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 303: Mid Eng Language & Literature

Representative works of Middle English literature from 1100 to 1500, exclusive of Chaucer. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 303W: Mid Eng Language/Literature

Representative works of Middle English literature from 1100 to 1500, exclusive of Chaucer. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 304: Chaucer

Readings in The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and selected other works. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 304W: Chaucer

Readings in The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, and selected other works. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 308: Arthurian Literature

Readings in the medieval and subsequent Arthurian tradition. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 308W: Arthurian Literature

Readings in the medieval and subsequent Arthurian tradition. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 310: Medieval & Renaissance Drama

Representative medieval, Elizabethan, and Jacobean plays with some attention to the development of early English drama. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 310W: Medieval & Renaissance Drama

Representative medieval, Elizabethan, and Jacobean plays with some attention to the development of early English drama. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 311R: Shakespeare

Selected major plays from the histories, comedies, tragedies, and romances. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 311RW: Shakespeare

Selected major plays from the histories, comedies, tragedies, and romances. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 312: Studies in Shakespeare

Special topics in the study of Shakespeare. May include historical approaches, thematic emphases, performance studies, etc. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 312W: Studies In Shakespeare

Special topics in the study of Shakespeare. May include historical approaches, thematic emphases, performance studies, etc. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 314: Renaiss Literature: 1485-1603

Selected works of sixteenth-century literature, including authors such as More, Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, and Shakespeare. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 314W: Renaiss Literature: 1485-1603

Selected works of sixteenth-century literature, including authors such as More, Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, and Shakespeare. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 315: Renaiss Literature: 1603-1660

Selected works of early to mid-seventeenth century literature, with an emphasis on the poetry of Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, Jonson, Herrick, Vaughan, and Marvell. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 315W: Renaiss Literature: 1603-1660

Selected works of early to mid-seventeenth century literature, with an emphasis on the poetry of Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, Jonson, Herrick, Vaughan, and Marvell. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 317: Milton

Selected major works (poetry and prose) with particular emphasis on the early lyric verse, Comus, Paradise Lost, and Samson Agonistes. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 317W: Milton

Selected major works (poetry and prose) with particular emphasis on the early lyric verse, Comus, Paradise Lost, and Samson Agonistes. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 320: Restoratn & Early 18th Cent.

Selected works of Restoration and Augustan literature, including authors such as Dryden, Behn, Congreve, Swift, Pope, Addison, and Steele. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 320W: Restoratn & Early 18th Cent.

Selected works of Restoration and Augustan literature, including authors such as Dryden, Behn, Congreve, Swift, Pope, Addison, and Steele. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 321: Later 18th C Lit:1740-1798

Selected works of later eighteenth-century authors such as Johnson, Boswell, Burke, Burns, Blake, and Wollstonecraft. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 321W: Later 18th C Lit:1740-1798

Selected works of later eighteenth-century authors such as Johnson, Boswell, Burke, Burns, Blake, and Wollstonecraft. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 325: The Early English Novel

The development of the English novel in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries with representative works by novelists such as Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, and Sterne. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 325W: The Early English Novel

The development of the English novel in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries with representative works by novelists such as Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, and Sterne. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 328W: Race, Gender, and Media-Making

Students will learn about media studies and cultural studies frameworks to analyze popular media throughout the century. Students write in class daily, blog to larger audiences weekly, draft and revise multiple multimodal projects, and respond meaningfully to peers' work in structured workshops. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 330: Romanticism

Selected works of Romantic literature with an emphasis on poetry, including poets such as Smith, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, as well as selections from prose writers such as Hazlitt and DeQuincey. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 330W: Romanticism

Selected works of Romantic literature with an emphasis on poetry, including poets such as Smith, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, as well as selections from prose writers such as Hazlitt and DeQuincey. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 332: Victorian Literature

Representative works from the Victorian period, including poets such as Tennyson, the Brownings, and the Rossettis, and prose writers such as Carlyle, Mill, Ruskin, and Cobbe. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 332W: Victorian Literature

Representative works from the Victorian period, including poets such as Tennyson, the Brownings, and the Rossettis, and prose writers such as Carlyle, Mill, Ruskin, and Cobbe. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 335: The English Romantic Novel

The development of the English novel in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, including authors such as Austen and Scott and significant genres such as the gothic novel and the novel of education. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 335W: The English Romantic Novel

The development of the English novel in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, including authors such as Austen and Scott and significant genres such as the gothic novel and the novel of education. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 336: The English Victorian Novel

The development of the British novel during the Victorian period, with representative works by novelists such as the Brontes, Dickens, Eliot, Meredith, Hardy, and Conrad. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 336W: The English Victorian Novel

The development of the British novel during the Victorian period, with representative works by novelists such as the Brontes, Dickens, Eliot, Meredith, Hardy, and Conrad. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 340: Modern English Literature

Selected works from various genres by twentieth-century authors writing in English such as Yeats, Joyce, Shaw, Eliot, Lawrence, Auden, and Thomas. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 340W: Modern English Literature

Selected works from various genres by twentieth-century authors writing in English such as Yeats, Joyce, Shaw, Eliot, Lawrence, Auden, and Thomas. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 341: 20th Century English Novel

The development of the modern English novel with representative works by authors such as Joyce, Forster, Woolf, Lawrence, Waugh, and Naipaul. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 341W: 20th Century English Novel

The development of the modern English novel with representative works by authors such as Joyce, Forster, Woolf, Lawrence, Waugh, and Naipaul. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 342R: Modern Irish Literature

An interdisciplinary course which examines the trajectory of Irish writing from the 1890s to the present. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 342RW: Modern Irish Literature

An interdisciplinary course which examines the trajectory of Irish writing from the 1890s to the present. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 345: Topics Postcolonial Literature

New literatures in English by writers from former British colonies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 345W: Topics Postcolonial Literature

New literatures in English by writers from former British colonies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 346: Contemporary British Theater

Studies in contemporary British drama with representative works by authors including Pinter, Churchill, Stoppard, and others. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 346W: Contemporary British Theater

Studies in contemporary British drama with representative works by authors including Pinter, Churchill, Stoppard, and others. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 348: Contemporary Literature

Selected works from various genres by writers from the 1950s to the present. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 348W: Contemporary Literature

Selected works from various genres by writers from the 1950s to the present. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 350: Early Amer Lit::Colonial -1830

Selected American writings of the colonial, revolutionary, and early national periods including authors such as Taylor, Bradstreet, Edwards, Franklin, Wheatley, and Irving. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 350W: Early Amer Lit:Colonial - 1830

Selected American writings of the colonial, revolutionary, and early national periods including authors such as Taylor, Bradstreet, Edwards, Franklin, Wheatley, and Irving. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 351: American Literature:1830 -1900

Selected poetry and prose works of nineteenth century American authors such as Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Hawthorne, Whitman, Dickinson, Howells, James, and Twain. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 351W: American Literature: 1830-1900

Selected poetry and prose works of nineteenth century American authors such as Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Hawthorne, Whitman, Dickinson, Howells, James, and Twain. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 352: American Literature Since 1900

Selected works from various genres by twentieth-century American writers such as Frost, Eliot, Stevens, W. C. Williams, Faulkner, Hemingway, O'Neill, Miller, and T. Williams. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 352W: American Literature Since 1900

Selected works from various genres by twentieth-century American writers such as Frost, Eliot, Stevens, W. C. Williams, Faulkner, Hemingway, O'Neill, Miller, and T. Williams. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 354: 19th Century American Novel

The early development of the American novel with representative works by novelists such as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Howells, and Twain. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 354W: 19th Century American Novel

The early development of the American novel with representative works by novelists such as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Howells, and Twain. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 355: 20th Century American Novel

The development of the modern American novel with representative works by novelists such as Wharton, Dreiser, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Steinbeck, and Bellow. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 355W: 20th Century American Novel

The development of the modern American novel with representative works by novelists such as Wharton, Dreiser, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Steinbeck, and Bellow. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 356: Native American Literature

The traditions of Native American verbal expression in the United States. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 356W: Native American Literature

The traditions of Native American verbal expression in the United States. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 357: Southern Literature

The development of Southern literature with representative works by writers such as Mark Twain, Cable, Glasgow, Chesnutt, Faulkner, Welty, O'Connor, and Percy. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 357W: Southern Literature

The development of Southern literature with representative works by writers such as Mark Twain, Cable, Glasgow, Chesnutt, Faulkner, Welty, O'Connor, and Percy. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 358: Studies in AF/AM Lit to 1900

Major literary traditions of African American writers to 1900. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 358W: Studies in AF/AM Lit to 1900

Major literary traditions of African American writers to 1900. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 359: Studies AF/AM Lit.1900-Present

A topics course dealing with major traditions and issues in African American literature from 1900 to the present. Possible topics include passing and miscegenation, black novels since 1950, Afrofuturism, and black theater. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 359W: Studies AF/AM Lit.1900-Present

A topics course dealing with major traditions and issues in African American literature from 1900 to the present. Possible topics include passing and miscegenation, black novels since 1950, Afrofuturism, and black theater. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 360: The English Language

Structure and history of the English language. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 360W: The English Language

Structure and history of the English language. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 361: American English

American English from the colonial period to the present; the sources of its vocabulary, the characteristics of its dialects, and the linguistic distinctiveness of its literature. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 361W: American English

American English from the colonial period to the present; the sources of its vocabulary, the characteristics of its dialects, and the linguistic distinctiveness of its literature. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 362: Structure of Modern English

Modern English grammar, with attention to phonology, morphology, and contemporary models of syntactic description. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 362W: Structure of Modern English

Modern English grammar, with attention to phonology, morphology, and contemporary models of syntactic description. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 363: Discourse Analysis

Discourse analysis explores language use beyond the sentence level. With an interdisciplinary perspective, students learn about important theoretical frameworks and practice the methodologies associated with them to examine structures of expression and meaning. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 363W: Discourse Analysis

Discourse analysis explores language use beyond the sentence level. With an interdisciplinary perspective, students learn about important theoretical frameworks and practice the methodologies associated with them to examine structures of expression and meaning. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 365: Modern Drama

Development of modern drama from the late nineteenth century to 1950, including dramatists such as Ibsen, Shaw, Yeats, Synge, O'Neill, and Williams. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 365W: Modern Drama

Development of modern drama from the late nineteenth century to 1950, including dramatists such as Ibsen, Shaw, Yeats, Synge, O'Neill, and Williams. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 366: Contemporary Drama

Selected works of the contemporary theater since 1950, including dramatists such as Beckett, Bond, Fornes, Gems, Pinter, Shepard, and Wilson. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 366W: Contemporary Drama

Selected works of the contemporary theater since 1950, including dramatists such as Beckett, Bond, Fornes, Gems, Pinter, Shepard, and Wilson. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 368: Literature & Cultural Studies

An introduction to the relationship between literary studies and the study of cultural theory and popular culture. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 368W: Literature & Cultural Studies

An introduction to the relationship between literary studies and the study of cultural theory and popular culture. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 369: Satire

A study of major satiric literary works, primarily English and American, with some attention to visual and journalistic satire and to theories of satire. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 369W: Satire

A study of major satiric literary works, primarily English and American, with some attention to visual and journalistic satire and to theories of satire. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 380: Topics:Writing/Rhet/Literacy

Course topics will vary but always will be focused on writing, rhetorical composition and analysis, or literacy skills. Topics possible include a variety of options such as journalistic writing, non-fiction, debate, argumentation, persuasion, digital writing, among others. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 380W: Topic: Writing/ Rhet/Literacy

Course topics will vary but always will be focused on writing, rhetorical composition and analysis, or literacy skills. Topics possible include a variety of options such as journalistic writing, non-fiction, debate, argumentation, persuasion, digital writing, among others. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 381: Topics in Women's Literature

Topics and perspectives vary over successive offerings, such as the political novel and feminist poetics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENG 381W: Topics In Women's Literature

Topics and perspectives vary over successive offerings, such as the political novel and feminist poetics. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENG 382R: Studies in Women's Poetry

Selected works of British and American women, including authors such as Browning, Rossetti, Dickinson, Plath, Levertov, Rich, and Lorde. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 382RW: Studies In Women's Poetry

Selected works of British and American women, including authors such as Browning, Rossetti, Dickinson, Plath, Levertov, Rich, and Lorde. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 383R: Studies in Women's Fiction

Selected prose works of British and American women, including authors such as Behn, Austen, Woolf, Lessing, Morrison, and Walker. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 383RW: Studies In Women's Fiction

Selected prose works of British and American women, including authors such as Behn, Austen, Woolf, Lessing, Morrison, and Walker. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 384R: Criticism

Prerequisites: two courses in literature or the instructor's consent. The relationship of critical theory to various literary forms. Specific material for analysis will vary in successive offerings of this course. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 384RW: Criticism

Prerequisites: two courses in literature or the instructor's consent. The relationship of critical theory to various literary forms. Specific material for analysis will vary in successive offerings of this course. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 386: Literature and Science

Exploration of the ways in which literary writers have developed scientific ideas and scientists have expressed themselves through creative writing. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 386W: Literature and Science

Exploration of the ways in which literary writers have developed scientific ideas and scientists have expressed themselves through creative writing. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 387: Topics:Literature and Religion

Prerequisites: one course in religion and one in literature or the instructor's consent. Reading and interpretation of literary works (poems, novels, plays) with special attention to the religious issues they address and/or the way they engage the Bible. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENG 387W: Topics: Literature & Religion

Prerequisites: one course in religion and one in literature or the instructor's consent. Reading and interpretation of literary works (poems, novels, plays) with special attention to the religious issues they address and/or the way they engage the Bible. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENG 389: Special Topics: Literature

Literary topics vary. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENG 389W: Special Topics:Literature

Literary topics vary. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENG 397R: Advanced Writing Lab

Provides mentoring for writing and presentation components of a course undertaken in students' home departments. Runs concurrently with development and presentation of students' research and/or experiential projects. Credit Hours: 1.

ENG 397RWR: Advanced Writing Lab

Provides mentoring for writing and presentation components of a course undertaken in students' home departments. Runs concurrently with development and presentation of students' research and/or experiential projects. Credit Hours: 1.

ENG 399R: Independent Study

Every semester. Credit variable; may be repeated for a maximum of eight hours of credit. Prerequisite: approval of project by adviser before preregistration. For students wishing to pursue projects of their own design. Credit Hours: 1-12.

ENG 399RW: Independent Study

Every semester. Credit variable; may be repeated for a maximum of eight hours of credit. Prerequisite: approval of project by adviser before preregistration. For students wishing to pursue projects of their own design. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-12.

ENG 412R: Sem:Studies in Shakespeare

Studies focus on groups of plays, dramatic genres, Shakespearean criticism, non-dramatic verse, or similar subjects. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 412RW: Sem: Studies in Shakespeare

Studies focus on groups of plays, dramatic genres, Shakespearean criticism, non-dramatic verse, or similar subjects. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 480R: Seminar in Poetry: English

Studies in poetry. Readings may focus on one or more authors or poetic traditions. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 480RW: Seminar in Poetry:English

Studies in poetry. Readings may focus on one or more authors or poetic traditions. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 481R: Seminar in Drama

Studies in drama and theater history. Readings may focus on one or more authors or on questions of dramaturgy and theater history. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 482R: Seminar in English: Fiction

Studies in narrative fiction and narrative forms. Readings vary and may focus on one or more authors or on questions of literary art. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 482RW: Seminar in Fiction:English

Studies in narrative fiction and narrative forms. Readings vary and may focus on one or more authors or on questions of literary art. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 483R: Seminar in Criticism & Theory

Studies in literary criticism, the history of criticism, and literary theory. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 483RW: Seminar in Criticism & Theory

Studies in literary criticism, the history of criticism, and literary theory. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 489: Special Top Adv Study:English

Intensive study of specific literary topics, e.g., questions of form or history, or concentrations on one or more authors or literary movements. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENG 489W: Special Top Adv Study:English

Intensive study of specific literary topics, e.g., questions of form or history, or concentrations on one or more authors or literary movements. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENG 490: Sem in Literary Interpretation

Fall semester. Required of honors students (other seniors may enroll with permission of director of undergraduate studies). Readings in the theory and practice of literary criticism. Designed to assist honors students in researching their theses. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENG 490W: Sem in Literary Interpretation

Fall semester. Required of honors students (other seniors may enroll with permission of director of undergraduate studies). Readings in the theory and practice of literary criticism. Designed to assist honors students in researching their theses. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 494RW: Honors in Playwriting

A tutorial designed primarily to assist honors candidates in preparing their projects. Students will be approved for Honors in Playwriting 494RW when the principal focus of the project is writing a new script. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

ENG 495R: Honors Thesis

Every semester. Credit, variable; may be repeated for a maximum of eight hours of credit. Prerequisite: approval of adviser and the director of undergraduate studies. Open to students writing honors theses. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ENG 495RW: Honors Thesis

Every semester. Credit, variable; may be repeated for a maximum of eight hours of credit. Prerequisite: approval of adviser and the director of undergraduate studies. Open to students writing honors theses. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ENG 496R: Internship In English

Every semester. Credit, variable; may be repeated for a maximum of twelve hours of credit (does not count toward the major). Open to junior and senior English majors with approval of the coordinator. Applied learning in a supervised work experience, using skills related to the English major. Credit Hours: 1-12.

ENG 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in English. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Creative Writing

ENGCW 190: Freshman Sem:Creative Writing

Topics/genres vary. Emphasizes writing and reading as elements in intellectual exploration. Does not satisfy first-year writing requirement. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

ENGCW 270: Intro to Creative Writing

Every semester. Introductory workshop in creative writing covering at least two genres from the following: fiction, poetry, screenwriting, playwriting, creative nonfiction. Counts as a prerequisite for 300-level intermediate workshops but not for Advanced Fiction, Advanced Poetry, or Advanced Playwriting. May not be repeated for credit. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENGCW 270W: Intro to Creative Writing

Every semester. Introductory workshop in creative writing covering at least two genres from the following: fiction, poetry, screenwriting, playwriting, creative nonfiction. Counts as a prerequisite for 300-level intermediate workshops but not for Advanced Fiction, Advanced Poetry, or Advanced Playwriting. May not be repeated for credit. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENGCW 271: Introduction to Poetry Writing

Every semester. Introductory workshop in poetry writing. Counts as a prerequisite for 300-level intermediate workshops but not for Advanced Fiction, Advanced Poetry, or Advanced Playwriting. May not be repeated for credit. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENGCW 271W: Introduction to Poetry Writing

Every semester. Introductory workshop in poetry writing. Counts as a prerequisite for 300-level intermediate workshops but not for Advanced Fiction, Advanced Poetry, or Advanced Playwriting. May not be repeated for credit. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENGCW 272: Intro to Fiction Writing

Every semester. Introductory workshop in fiction writing. Counts as a prerequisite for 300-level intermediate workshops but not for Advanced Fiction, Advanced Poetry, or Advanced Playwriting. May not be repeated for credit. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENGCW 272W: Intro to Fiction Writing

Every semester. Introductory workshop in fiction writing. Counts as a prerequisite for 300-level intermediate workshops but not for Advanced Fiction, Advanced Poetry, or Advanced Playwriting. May not be repeated for credit. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENGCW 370R: Creative Wrt: Intermed Fiction

Every semester. Intermediate level workshop in writing fiction. ENG 270, 271, or 272 required as prerequisite. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENGCW 370RW: Creative Wrt: Intermed Fiction

Every semester. Intermediate level workshop in writing fiction. ENG 270, 271, or 272 required as prerequisite. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENGCW 371R: Creative Wrt: Intermed Poetry

Every semester. Intermediate level workshop in writing poetry. ENG 270, 271, or 272 required as prerequisite. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENGCW 371RW: Creative Wrt: Intermed Poetry

Every semester. Intermediate level workshop in writing poetry. ENG 270, 271, or 272 required as prerequisite. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENGCW 372R: Intermediate Playwriting

Every year. Intermediate level workshop in writing plays. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENGCW 372RW: Intermediate Playwriting

Every year. Intermediate level workshop in writing plays. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENGCW 373R: Creative Writing: Adv Fiction

Spring semester. Admittance by assessment of readiness for advanced work by intermediate level instructor in genre. Intensive workshop in the writing of fiction for advanced students. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENGCW 373RW: Creative Writing: Adv Fiction

Spring semester. Admittance by assessment of readiness for advanced work by intermediate level instructor in genre. Intensive workshop in the writing of fiction for advanced students. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENGCW 374R: Creative Writing: Adv Poetry

Spring semester. Admittance by assessment of readiness for advanced work by intermediate level instructor in genre. Intensive workshop in the writing of poetry for advanced students. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENGCW 374RW: Creative Writing: Adv Poetry

Spring semester. Admittance by assessment of readiness for advanced work by intermediate level instructor in genre. Intensive workshop in the writing of poetry for advanced students. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENGCW 375R: Creative Writing: Adv Drama

Spring semester. Admittance by assessment of readiness for advanced work by intermediate level instructor in genre. Intensive workshop in the writing of playwriting for advanced students. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENGCW 375RW: Creative Writing: Adv Drama

Spring semester. Admittance by assessment of readiness for advanced work by intermediate level instructor in genre. Intensive workshop in the writing of playwriting for advanced students. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENGCW 376R: Creativ Wrt:Interm Non-Fiction

Every semester. Intermediate level workshop in nonfiction genres that often use fictional techniques. ENGCW 270, 271, or 272 required as prerequisite. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENGCW 376RW: Creativ Wrt:Interm Non-Fiction

Every semester. Intermediate level workshop in nonfiction genres that often use fictional techniques. ENGCW 270, 271, or 272 required as prerequisite. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENGCW 377R: Creativ Wrt:Interm Translation

Every semester. Intermediate level workshop in the theory and practice of translation. ENGCW 270, 271, or 272 required as prerequisite. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENGCW 377RW: Creativ Wrt:Interm Translation

Every semester. Intermediate level workshop in the theory and practice of translation. ENGCW 270, 271, or 272 required as prerequisite. May be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENGCW 378R: Screenwriting

Prerequisite: FILM 270. A writing-intensive course in the construction and formatting of screenplays for upper-level undergraduates, which also broaches various aspects of pre-production planning. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FILM 270 as prerequisite.

ENGCW 378RW: Screenwriting

Prerequisite: FILM 270. A writing-intensive course in the construction and formatting of screenplays for upper-level undergraduates, which also broaches various aspects of pre-production planning. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as prerequisite.

ENGCW 379: Creative Writing: Spec.Topics

Credit, variable; maybe be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit when topic varies. Specific topics to be announced. Typical subjects include the novel, first person narrative, formalist poetry, and nonrealistic forms. ENGCW 270, 271, or 272 required as prerequisite. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENGCW 379W: Creative Writing: Spec. Topics

Credit, variable; maybe be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit when topic varies. Specific topics to be announced. Typical subjects include the novel, first person narrative, formalist poetry, and nonrealistic forms. ENGCW 270, 271, or 272 required as prerequisite. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENGCW 385RW: GA Civil Rights Cold Cases

Intermediate level workshop in writing and researching Southern Georgia's Civil Rights history. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ENGCW 397R: Creative Wrt.:Independent Stdy

Credit, variable; maybe be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. Project description and written permission of instructor required before registration. ENG 270, 271, or 272 required as prerequisite. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ENGCW 397RW: Creative Writing: Indep. Study

Credit, variable; maybe be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. Project description and written permission of instructor required before registration. ENG 270, 271, or 272 required as prerequisite. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ENGCW 495R: Creative Writing Honors

Offered every semester. Credit variable; may be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. Prerequisite: academic eligibility and approval of honors project director. A tutorial designed primarily to assist honors candidates in preparing their projects. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ENGCW 495RW: Creative Writing Honors

Offered every semester. Credit variable; may be repeated for a maximum of eight hours credit. Prerequisite: academic eligibility and approval of honors project director. A tutorial designed primarily to assist honors candidates in preparing their projects. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

Environmental Studies

ENVS 120: Living in the Anthropocene

Introduction to environmental sciences through overarching hot-button research topics in earth science, ecology, resilience, and sustainability. Human impact on the environment will be discussed and debated through interdisciplinary analysis of case studies. Appropriate for majors and non-majors. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 125: Ecology, Geology & Nature Obs.

Students are introduced to basic concepts of ecology and geology via examples of field scientists' illustrated field journals; students will also maintain their own journals. Emphasis on learning local geology, hydrology, zoology and botany, but skills applicable for understanding nature anywhere. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 130: Environmental Sciences

This course is an introduction to the concepts and methods related to the study of environmental sciences. Students will be introduced to relevant theories from physical, ecological and social sciences. This course is intended for majors and minors in Environmental Sciences. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 131: Intro.to ENVS Field Studies

Applies and integrates theories and concepts of environmental science through field study. Introduction to Piedmont geology, water, land and forest use, management and policy. Introduction to ENVS research and community engaged learning. This course is required for ENVS majors and minors. Credit Hours: 2.

ENVS 140: Environmental Change & Health

Human and environmental health are incredibly intertwined. This course will introduce the relationships emerging between humans, animals and environmental change and examine health issues, scientific understanding of causes, and possible future approaches to global environmental and health problems. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 190: Fresh Sem:Environmentl Studies

The topics for freshman seminars are variable and change every semester. Past offerings include Climate Change, Global Earth Systems, Interpreting Behavior That You Can't See, Ecological Economics, Plants, People and Places and Ecological Restoration. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 222: Evolutn of the Earth with Lab

History of earth in context of changing global environments. Emphasizes biological systems interacting with global processes: plate tectonics, climate change, sea level; lab exercises on minerals, rocks, fossils, geologic maps. Fulfills Intermediate Earth Science and upper-level lab for ENVS majors. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 120/131, BIOLOX111.

ENVS 225: Institutions & The Environment

Introduces theories of human interaction with the environment. Focus is on holistically examining the factors social science research suggests drives human behavior towards natural resources. Focused on Ostrom's IAD and SES Frameworks. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 227: Environmental Policy

Introduction to basic concepts of American environmental policy. Topics include: history of federal environmental policymaking, environmental policy tools, controversies in environmental policy, and U.S. environmental policy in the age of globalization. Field trips required. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOLOX111/POLS100.

ENVS 227W: Environmental Policy

Introduction to basic concepts of American environmental policy. Topics include: history of federal environmental policymaking, environmental policy tools, controversies in environmental policy, and U.S. environmental policy in the age of globalization. Field trips required. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOLOX111/POLS100.

ENVS 228: Environmental Policy with Lab

Prerequisite: ENVS 131, POLS 100 or permission. An introduction to basic concepts of American environmental policy in the age of globalization. Topics include the history of federal policymaking, policy tools and controversies in environmental policy. Field trips and weekly lab required. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

ENVS 228W: Environmental Policy with Lab

Prerequisite: ENVS 131, POLS 100 or permission. An introduction to basic concepts of American environmental policy in the age of globalization. Topics include the history of federal policymaking, policy tools and controversies in environmental policy. Field trips and weekly lab required. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 5.

ENVS 229: Atmospheric Science with Lab

Meteorology is the science of the atmosphere and the weather it produces. It seeks to understand the dynamics of the system in terms of available energy and how those dynamics produce the daily weather and long-term climate of the globe. This course will include a weekly lab. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 4.

ENVS 230: Fundamentals of Geology w/Lab

Introduction to earth processes. Topics include minerals, the rock cycle, the hydrologic cycle, stream dynamics, glacial and coastal processes, energy resources, plate tectonics, earthquakes and volcanism. Fulfills the Intermediate Earth Science and upper level lab course for ENVS majors. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 232: Fundamentals of Ecology w/Lab

Overview of ecology, including ecosystem structure and function, ecosystem dynamics, methods of ecosystem analysis, energy flow, nutrient dynamics, population and community ecology and human dominated ecosystems. General Education Requirement: SNTL. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131 or ENVS_OX 131 prereq.

ENVS 234: Biophilic and Green Design

Application of basic ecological concepts to the design of architectural structures. In addition, the course will explore the concept of 'biophilia'(inherent love of nature) and 'biomimicry'(using nature to inform design) in architectural design. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 235: Environmental Geology

This course focuses on interactions between human activities and geologic processes. Topics include floods, earthquakes, volcanism, risk and resilience, air and water pollution, mineral and energy resources and climate change. Intermediate Earth Science or upper level elective for ENVS majors. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 239: Physical Oceanography

Overview of ocean processes, including the causes and effects of waves and currents, geology of the sea floor, coastal erosion, and related environmental and economic effects. Fulfills intermediate Earth Science requirement for ENVS majors. May also be used for an ENVS elective requirement. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 240: Ecosystem Ecology

Overview of ecosystem ecology, including dynamics of large scale systems, landscape ecology, ecosystem structure, and function. Topics in the course will include: methods of ecosystem analysis, energy flow, nutrient cycling, community dynamics, issues of scale, models, and ecosystem properties. Fulfills ENVS Intermediate Ecology and Conservation requirement and upper-level lab requirement. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 240L: Ecosystem Ecology Lab

This is the laboratory portion of the ENVS 240 Ecosystem Ecology class. Field studies and laboratory exercises will be conducted in various ecosystems around north Georgia. Credit Hours: 1.

ENVS 241: Mod & Anc Trop Environments

Modern and ancient tropical environments of The Bahamas. Topics: sea level, island biogeography, reef ecology, geology, human effects on environments. Required weekend field trip to Georgia barrier island. Must be taken with ENVS 242 to fulfill ENVS Intermediate Earth Science and ENVS field course. Credit Hours: 1. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 242: Mod & Anc Trop Env Field Crs

Field-based study of modern and ancient tropical environments on San Salvador Island, Bahamas. Topics: terrestrial, intertidal and subtidal environments; rocky and sandy shorelines; hypersaline lakes; caves; reefs; lagoons; biological and geological methods in the field. Fulfills ENVS field course. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 241.

ENVS 247: Ecology

This course provides an overview of the principles of ecology and the study of relationships between organisms and their environment. Processes and properties of individuals, populations, communities, and ecosystems will be emphasized. Lectures will emphasize active and collaborative learning. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142/142L or 152 prereq..

ENVS 247L: Ecology Laboratory

This is the laboratory portion of the Ecology class. Field studies will be conducted in various natural areas in Georgia, including a weekend trip to the mountains. Pre- or corequisite: Biology/ENVS 247. (This course meets the upper-level laboratory requirement for the biology major.). Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: BIOL142 & 247as a Prerequisite.

ENVS 247LW: Ecology Laboratory

This is the laboratory portion of the Ecology class. Field studies will be conducted in various natural areas in Georgia, including a weekend trip to the mountains. Pre- or corequisite: Biology/ENVS 247. (This course meets the upper-level laboratory requirement for the biology major and the WR GER.). General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL142 & 247as a Prerequisite.

ENVS 250: Fundam. of Cartography & GIS

Explores the study and design of maps and geographic information systems (GIS) as a problem-solving tool for geographic analysis with focus on applications of GIS, data collection and processing, cartographic design, and trends in geospatial technology. Fulfills an ENVS elective requirement. Credit Hours: 4.

ENVS 260: Quant Tech in Environ Stdy

Quantitative methods in environmental studies, with a focus on statistical methods. Required for ENVS majors. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: QTM 100 or QTM_OX 100 prereq..

ENVS 275: Nature and Culture in Japan

We examine the interaction between the human and natural world in Japanese cultural and scientific history by looking at maps, literature, scriptures, visual media, and current journalism. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 285: Special Topics

A course designed for second year students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. This course may count as elective credit for the ENVS major and minor; relevant topics may count towards the ENVS Sustainability Sciences or Earth and Atmospheric Sciences minors. See current course atlas. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENVS 285W: Special Topics

A course designed for second year students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. This course may count as elective credit for the ENVS major and minor; relevant topics may count towards the ENVS Sustainability Sciences or Earth and Atmospheric Sciences minors. See current course atlas. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENVS 286: Special Topics w/Lab

A course designed for second year students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. Lecture with weekly lab sessions. This course may count as an upper level lab for the ENVS major; relevant topics may count as elective credit for ENVS minors. See current course atlas. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENVS 286W: Special Topics w/Lab

A course designed for second year students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. Lecture with weekly lab sessions. This course may count as an upper level lab for the ENVS major; relevant topics may count as elective credit for ENVS minors. See current course atlas. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENVS 287: Special Topics w/Field

A course designed for second year students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. Lecture with required field trips. This course may count as an upper level field course for the ENVS major; relevant topics may count as elective credit for ENVS minors. See current course atlas. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENVS 287W: Special Topics w/Field

A course designed for second year students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. Lecture with required field trips. This course may count as an upper level field course for the ENVS major; relevant topics may count as elective credit for ENVS minors. See current course atlas. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENVS 299R: Fundamentals of ENVS Rsrch.

Variable credit. Permission of faculty supervisor required prior to enrollment. Designed primarily for sophomores, this course provides ENVS students with foundational skills for research under the supervision of a faculty member. A stepping stone to more advanced research work. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ENVS 318: Natural Science Illustration

Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 320: Environ Assessment/Managemen

Introduction to Adaptive Natural Resource Management. The course will review existing theories, concepts and methods of adaptive assessment, management, and case histories of systems where adaptive management approaches have been applied. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS131/240/247, BIOLOX111.

ENVS 321: Geology and Human Health

Interdisciplinary course discussing the connections between Earth and human body processes. Examines intrinsic and extrinsic metabolic pathways controlling health, pathogens, disease, pollution, natural resources, and earth and human cycles. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 324: Environmental Economics

This course introduces the fields of environmental and ecological economics. Our focus is on how economic thinking can be used to interpret and inform environmental policy and management of pollution, climate change, fisheries, forestry, water, biodiversity, and food production. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131 & ENVS 260 as prereq..

ENVS 325: Energy and Climate Change

Energy generation and consumption at the individual, regional, national and international level are used as a lens for understanding climate change. Particular attention is paid to the interaction between scientific uncertainty and global decision making. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS131/ 227/377/POL 110.

ENVS 326: Climate Change and Society

This course draws upon the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework on Climate Change (UNFCCC) as a way to explain issues related to the science, policy, and business of climate change from an interdisciplinary perspective. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 328: Intro.to Atmospheric Chemistry

This course will provide knowledge in atmospheric chemistry, focusing on the physical and chemical processes. Students will be able to: 1) explain important atmospheric phenomena from the local to global scale; and 2) critically assess public discussions and media coverage on air pollution. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: PHYS 141/2 or 151/2 PRERQ #726.

ENVS 329: Religion and Ecology

Historical, philosophical, and ethical relationships between religion and ecology; other dimensions include Eastern thought, ecofeminism, animal rights, and literary nature writers. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

ENVS 330: Climatology

Climatology studies the properties of the atmosphere and ocean and the resulting climates. We emphasize the energy cascade of the climate system and climate change. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 331: Earth Systems Science

This course covers how the atmosphere, oceans and land work together to produce the characteristics of the planet, how this synergy has changed in the past, and how human activity affects the system. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 340: Wetland Ecology

This course introduces students to the ecology of wetlands. The course covers factors that influence the hydrology of wetlands, present the ecology of a diverse set of wetland systems and introduce a range of management issues that confront wetland managers. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 342: Barrier Island

Overview of barrier islands, integrates geology and ecology to understand barrier islands as places denoted by dramatic and rapid change. Includes human-related factors related to barrier islands and effects of climate change. Weekend field trip to Georgia barrier islands. Fulfills ENVS Elective.??. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 344: American Environmental History

History of the relationship between the American people, land, weather, and natural resources, with special attention to the environmental movement since 1960. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 345: Conservation Biology

This course focuses on the conservation of biodiversity and introduces students to ways that ecological and evolutionary principles can be used to conserve and protect species and ecosystems at risk. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131, BIOLOX111, BIOL 142.

ENVS 346: Geol.Orig. of Landscapes w/Lab

Introduction to Earth??s surface landforms, produced by tectonic, stream, desert, coastal and glacial processes. Topics include the effects of catastrophic events such as volcanic eruptions, tsunami and landslides. Course includes lab and field experience. Elective for ENVS major and minors. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 347: Landscapes and Geomorphology

Examines cultural and physical landscapes and their temporal and spatial changes using geospatial technologies and methods. Cultural landscape study focuses on the interaction between people and places. Geomorphology focuses on geologic features of Earth's surface and change over time. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131 as prerequisite.

ENVS 348: Sustainable Water Res.with Lab

Topics include the hydrologic cycle, surface and groundwater hydrology, effects of human activity on water quality and supply, water management, water scarcity and conflict. Special emphasis on sustainable practices in water resource management. Upper level lab course elective for ENVS majors. . Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 349: Ecology of Invasions

This course will familiarize students with principles of ecological invasions and methods for assessing the spread and impacts of invasive species on a global scale. Students will also become familiar with major sources of exotic species introductions and methods available for prevention and control. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131, BIOLOX111, BIOL 142.

ENVS 350: Env Thgt:Ethics,Phil. & Issues

This course exposes students to philosophical and ethical dimensions of human-nature relationships. Students will consider their own views toward nature. Philosophical and ethical concepts are examined through readings, discussions, and group activities. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 350W: Env Thgt:Ethics,Phil. & Issues

This course exposes students to philosophical and ethical dimensions of human-nature relationships. Students will consider their own views toward nature. Philosophical and ethical concepts are examined through readings, discussions, and group activities. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 352: Green Business

Explores the role of business in `doing good?? for society, how to develop a vision for sustainability within a company, what it means to work on environmental concerns in a major corporation, and compares the approaches of leading companies. Emphasis on readings, writing assignments and discussion. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 225 or 227 as prereq..

ENVS 352W: Green Business

Explores the role of business in `doing good?? for society, how to develop a vision for sustainability within a company, what it means to work on environmental concerns in a major corporation, and compares the approaches of leading companies. Emphasis on readings, writing assignments and discussion. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 225 or 227 as prereq..

ENVS 359: Ecology & Evolution of Disease

From prehistory to today, pathogens have played a central role in our existence. This course will provide insights into why we get sick and how we heal by examining human disease within the context of ecology and evolution. Required for ENVS BS/MPH students. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 361: Ecosystems Through Time

Introduction to paleoecology and paleoecological methods. Includes geological and paleontological evidence for marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems from past 600 million years; interpreting how ecosystems evolved; comparing ancient ecosystems with modern analogues. Fulfills ENVS Elective. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 362: Mineralogy and Petrology

Mineralogy is the study of mineral identification and classification using symmetry, physical and optical properties and the genesis of minerals, mining processes and mineral use in society. Petrology is the study of minerals and the petrogenesis of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131 as prerequisite.

ENVS 365: Urban Geography

Using Global Cities and Atlanta as "laboratory" this course examines the urban environment and explores issues in urban planning and policy, sustainability, and environmental management while employing the use of geo-spatial computer applications. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 368: Latin American Landscapes

This course explores the history of the environment in Latin America from the pre-Colombian period through the present. It covers the physical and cultural transformation of landscapes across the region, linking environmental change to culture, economics, politics, and ideology. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 370A: Community Bldg & Soc Change I

Open only to undergraduate students by permission of the instructor. Additionally, this course is required for all students seeking to apply for the fellowship in Community Building and Social Change. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 370B: Planning Community Initiatives

Open only to students admitted as fellows in the program in Community Building and Social Change. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

ENVS 370BW: Planning Community Initiatives

Open only to students admitted as fellows in the program in Community Building and Social Change. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 5.

ENVS 370L: Planning Comm.Initiatives-Lab

Open only to students admitted as fellows in the program in Community Building and Social Change. Credit Hours: 1.

ENVS 371: Ecology of the Tropics

Explores the diverse biomes of the tropics. Focus will be on tropical forests and grasslands, with an emphasis on ecological processes, biodiversity, human impact in the tropics, indigenous peoples, and ethnobotany. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: ENVS 131, BIOLOX111, BIOL 142.

ENVS 372: Ecology of the Tropics Field

Permission required. This is the field course to accompany the lecture course on tropical ecology. Field trip will take place during the spring recess. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: ENVS 371, BIOL 371.

ENVS 373: Marine Ecology

Lectures and readings focus on the diversity, structure, and conservation of marine ecosystems, including experimental and analytic approaches to their study. Discussions of primary literature cover current topics such as biological invasions, disease, climate change, and marine protected areas. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 232 or 240 or 247 prereq..

ENVS 377: Int'l Environmental Policy

Focuses on the complexity of policy problems surrounding international environmental issues, the fragility of international environmental institutions, and specific policy problems such as free trade, sustainable development, population growth, climate change, and endangered species. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS131, POLS 110.

ENVS 377W: Int'l Environmental Policy

Focuses on the complexity of policy problems surrounding international environmental issues, the fragility of international environmental institutions, and specific policy problems such as free trade, sustainable development, population growth, climate change, and endangered species. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS131, POLS 110.

ENVS 385: Topics: Environmental Studies

Variable topics that are offered as irregular courses. Past course topics have included: Finding Place: Technology, Stories, and the Environment; Introduction to Botany; Environment, Health, and Development; Conservation and Development; Booms and Busts in Resources of Georgia; and Paleoecology. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENVS 385W: Topics: Environmental Studies

Variable topics that are offered as irregular courses. Past course topics have included: Finding Place: Technology, Stories, and the Environment; Introduction to Botany; Environment, Health, and Development; Conservation and Development; Booms and Busts in Resources of Georgia; and Paleoecology. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENVS 386: Special Topics w/Lab

A course designed for intermediate students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. Lecture with weekly lab sessions. This course may count as an upper level lab for the ENVS major; relevant topics may count as elective credit for ENVS minors. See current course atlas. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENVS 386W: Special Topics w/Lab

A course designed for intermediate students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. Lecture with weekly lab sessions. This course may count as an upper level lab for the ENVS major; relevant topics may count as elective credit for ENVS minors. See current course atlas. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENVS 387: Special Topics w/Field

A course designed for intermediate students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. Lecture with required field trips. This course may count as an upper level field course for the ENVS major; relevant topics may count as elective credit for ENVS minors. See current course atlas. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENVS 387W: Special Topics w/Field

A course designed for intermediate students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. Lecture with required field trips. This course may count as an upper level field course for the ENVS major; relevant topics may count as elective credit for ENVS minors. See current course atlas. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENVS 390R: Sem On Environmental Issues

Credit, two hours. Weekly seminar on topics in Environmental Studies featuring speakers from within and outside the University. Students are required to read published articles authored by each speaker and submit weekly response papers. Group presentations on seminar topics are also required. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 399R: Intro to Independent Research

Variable credit. Permission required. Intended for students who have had some prior introduction to research, either in ENVS 299 or in another class or field. In this individual research course, research skills are developed and refined under supervision of an ENVS faculty member. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ENVS 420: Law and Biodiversity

This course allows students to explore the ecological and legal dimensions of environmental issues of biodiversity conservation, ecosystem management, and sustainable development. The class will combine readings and case studies. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ENVS 131/120, BIOL 111/142.

ENVS 426: U.N.Climate Change Conference

This class is offered to students selected to participate in a one-week fieldwork trip to the U.N. Climate Change Negotiation as a part of Emory??s delegation. The course explores interdisciplinary climate change issues from science, policy, and business perspectives. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: ENVS 326 as prerequisite.

ENVS 442: Ecology of Emory Univ w/Lab

This course will use ecological concepts to investigate the forests of the Emory campus. May be used to fulfill an Elective and Field Course requirement for ENVS students. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131/120, BIOL 111/142.

ENVS 442W: Ecology of Emory Univ w/lab

This course will use ecological concepts to investigate the forests of the Emory campus. May be used to fulfill an Elective and Field Course requirement for ENVS students. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 5. Requisites: ENVS 131/120, BIOL 111/142.

ENVS 443: Ecosystems of Georgia

This course investigates the influence of the physical environment on abundance and distribution of organisms in ecosystems and characterizes ecosystem structure and function for each ecosystem. Students will learn how to identify species and explore the natural history of dominant organisms. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131 as prerequisite.

ENVS 444: Ecosystems:SE U.S. with Lab

This course is focused on the diverse ecosystems of the Southeast, including: Piedmont, coastal barrier island, long-leaf pine, Okeefenokee, lake and river, farmland, and urban ecosystems. Weekend field trips required. Fulfills an ENVS Elective. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 446: Field Studies: Southern Africa

This summer field course will provide students with a hands-on experience in the southern African countries of Namibia and Botswana. Within a conservation biology perspective, students have the opportunity to learn about the unique habitats and conservation issues of southern Africa. Credit Hours: 6.

ENVS 458: Fishers and Fisheries

Advanced seminar exploring the challenges of fishing. Introduces social, economic, and technological aspects of the world's fisheries, then focuses on overfishing and means of controlling overfishing. Credit Hours: 3.

ENVS 459: Urban Ecology & Development

Urban ecology is broadly defined as the study of interactions between organisms and communities with urban environments and of the linkages between them and human activities. By taking a global perspective, this course will provide the foundations of urban ecology. Credit Hours: 4.

ENVS 460: Research Design & Practice

This course will provide the necessary skills and support for students to conduct research in a field of environmental studies through a series of lectures and engaged learning. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 260.

ENVS 483: Spatial Analys.in Disease Ecol

This course examines patterns of health in place and time, application of geospatial technologies for epidemiology, analysis of time-space relations, clusters and diffusion of disease, and the spatial ecology of selected infectious and non-infectious diseases. Fulfills an ENVS Elective requirement. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 250/260.

ENVS 485: Special Topics

A course designed for advanced students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. This course may count as elective credit for the ENVS major and minor; relevant topics may count towards the ENVS Sustainability Sciences or Earth and Atmospheric Sciences minors. See current course atlas. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENVS 485W: Special Topics

A course designed for advanced students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. This course may count as elective credit for the ENVS major and minor; relevant topics may count towards the ENVS Sustainability Sciences or Earth and Atmospheric Sciences minors. See current course atlas. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENVS 486: Special Topics w/Lab

A course designed for advanced students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. Lecture with weekly lab sessions. This course may count as an upper level lab for the ENVS major; relevant topics may count as elective credit for ENVS minors. See current course atlas. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENVS 486W: Special Topics w/Lab

A course designed for advanced students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. Lecture with weekly lab sessions. This course may count as an upper level lab for the ENVS major; relevant topics may count as elective credit for ENVS minors. See current course atlas. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENVS 487: Special Topics w/Field

A course designed for advanced students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. Lecture with required field trips. This course may count as an upper level field course for the ENVS major; relevant topics may count as elective credit for ENVS minors. See current course atlas. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ENVS 487W: Special Topics w/Filed

A course designed for advanced students on topics of interest in environmental sciences. Lecture with required field trips. This course may count as an upper level field course for the ENVS major; relevant topics may count as elective credit for ENVS minors. See current course atlas. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ENVS 491: Svc Learning Course In Envs

Students will apply their accumulated knowledge from their undergraduate experience at Emory to simulate a consultant/client model. The consultant model allows students to apply theories and concepts learned in other classes to a practical situation. Fulfills an ENVS Independent Study. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENVS 131/BIOL_OX 111 as Prereq.

ENVS 492R: Practicum:Comm Bldg & Soc Chng

Open only to students admitted as fellows in the program in Community Building and Social Change. Credit Hours: 2.

ENVS 494R: Individual Research in ENVS

Student research projects developed with the guidance of ENVS faculty. Permisson required. Previous research experience is not required. Fulfills the ENVS independent study requirement. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ENVS 494RW: Individual Research in ENVS

Student research projects developed with the guidance of ENVS faculty. Permisson required. Previous research experience is not required. Fulfills the ENVS independent study requirement. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ENVS 495A: Honors Research

Permission of Honors Coordinator required. Restricted to students accepted into the departmental Honors program. ENVS 495RWR may be used to fulfill a post-freshman writing requirement. Fulfills Independent Study requirement for ENVS majors (4 credit hrs). Does not count for ENVS Elective area credit. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ENVS 495BW: Honors Research

Permission of honors coordinator is required. Course is restricted to students who are accepted into the departmental honors program. Fulfills ENVS Independent Study requirement (4 credit hours).Does not count for ENVS Elective credit. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ENVS 497R: Undergraduate Internship

Variable credit. May be repeated for max 8 hours. ENVS permission and internship pre-approval required. Credit for working as an intern in environmentally-related, approved settings. Fulfills ENVS Independent Study requirement (at least 4 credit hours). Does not count for ENVS Elective requirement. Credit Hours: 3-5.

ENVS 498R: Individual Directed Reading

Variable credit. Permission of ENVS faculty supervisor required prior to enrollment. Course allows for students to work with faculty to explore topics that are not normally offered. May not be used for Elective area credit. Fulfills Independent Study requirement for ENVS majors (4 credit hours). Credit Hours: 1-8.

ENVS 498RW: Individual Directed Reading

Variable credit. Permission of ENVS faculty supervisor required prior to enrollment. Course allows for students to work with faculty to explore topics that are not normally offered. May not be used for Elective area credit. Fulfills Independent Study requirement for ENVS majors (4 credit hours). General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ENVS 499R: Advanced Independent Research

Students design a research project in collaboration with ENVS faculty. Permission required. Intended for students with previous research experience. Fulfills the ENVS Independent Study requirement. Credit Hours: 1-12.

ENVS 499RW: Advanced Independent Research

Students design a research project in collaboration with ENVS faculty. Permission required. Intended for students with previous research experience. Fulfills the ENVS Independent Study requirement. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-12.

ENVS 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Environmental Studies. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Film and Media Studies

FILM 106: Photography I

Introduces fundamental issues in photography & visual thinking using 35mm film cameras & B/W film. Topics: camera use, film developing, darkroom & printing skills, image selection & presentation, an overview of the history of photography, basic philosophy of photography, & interpretation of images. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 107: Intro to Digital Video

Creative as well as technical problems in these related media are examined; techniques in using cameras, projectors, and video editing equipment. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

FILM 190: Freshmen Seminar: Film, Media

Explores various topics in Film Studies or Media Studies. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

FILM 204: Introduction to Media Studies

Examines mass media (photography, film, music, news reporting, radio, TV, video games) through a variety of approaches in the humanities and social sciences. This course is required for the minor in Media Studies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 206R: Photography II

Following a theory-practice model, this course will engage key issues in visual thinking and photographic practice. Rotating topics include documentary photography, the interpretation of urban geography, experimental practices, and photographic books. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 106 as PreReq.

FILM 208: Digital Media & Culture

This class looks at the ways computer and digital technologies have changed how we think, communicate, express ourselves, learn, and interact with the world. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 204 or FILM 270 as prereq.

FILM 213: Cinematography and Lighting

This course combines the theoretical and practical elements of cinematography and lighting. Historical and contemporary trends and styles are examined. Video formats, exposure, camera placement,composition, movement and continuity will be covered. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FILM 107 ARTVIS 107 as prereq..

FILM 270: Introduction To Film

General aesthetic introductions to film as a narrative form, with selected readings in criticism and critical theory. Weekly screenings required. When taught as a WR course, it fulfills the postfreshman writing requirement of the GER. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 270W: Introduction To Film

General aesthetic introductions to film as a narrative form, with selected readings in criticism and critical theory. Weekly screenings required. When taught as a WR course, it fulfills the postfreshman writing requirement of the GER. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 5.

FILM 300R: Filmmaking Practicum

Provides filmmaking students the opportunity to work under the supervision of faculty on a professional quality narrative or documentary film in creative areas(i.e., writing, cinematography, sound, editing, design) or administrative areas(i.e. budgeting, contracting, management, publicity). General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3-4.

FILM 306R: Advanced Photography

In this course, each student will realize an in-depth, self-designed body of work. The course is critique-only, and rigorously paced. All photographic technologies are open to use, and all presentational formats, including exhibition, book, and web/DVD. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 206R as PreReq.

FILM 311: Writing the Short Film

An intro to the theory and craft of dramatic screenwriting of the short film. Explores how a short script is developed from concept to final written form. Class includes lectures, film viewing, and exercises but is primarily a workshop where new writing receives weekly table reads and feedback. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FILM 270 or FILM_OX 270 prereq.

FILM 319: Media,Islam,& Social Movements

How do we understand the events that recently erupted with different degrees of violence in North African and Middle Eastern countries? Why were experts including diplomats, pundits, and politicians taken by surprise? How do media outlets like CNN, BBC, and Al Jazeera cover this "social uprising"?. Credit Hours: 3.

FILM 326: Acting for the Camera

This class explores camera acting, including making the transition from stage to screen. Through on-camera exercises, collaborative projects, and screenings, actors will gain the tools they need to perform in a film, web or television shoot with greater confidence, clarity and freedom. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 376 or THEA 221orTHEA 222.

FILM 343: Ethnographic Cinema

The course offers an introduction to ethnographic cinema. It focuses on classic and contemporary films. Students explore issues concerning the nature of evidence, salvage anthropology, the politics of representation, concepts of participation and collaboration, aesthetics and ethnography. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 355: Film, Media, and Social Change

This course focuses on film and other art-based mediums to explore the function and role media in social change movements and its role in addressing social issues. Students will move between the classroom and working in creative teams to develop a short documentary film or photographic exhibit. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

FILM 356: History Of American Television

This course looks at the nature and development of major institutions of American broadcasting and electronic media in order to ascertain the structure, function, and social significance of television programming in American society. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 359: Melodrama, Culture, Politics

Explores the historical, cultural, political and aesthetic influence of melodrama in all its forms, particularly blockbuster action drama (Harry Potter, Star Wars, The Hunger Games), television serials, and social or family dramas by such figures as Sirk and Fassbinder. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 371: History Of Film To 1954

American and European cinema from its origins in nineteenth-century technological experimentation through the early years of sound and the outbreak of war in Europe. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 372: History Of Film Since 1954

World cinema, including Asian and Eastern European, from World War II and the advent of the modern sound film to the present. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 373: Special Topics in Film

Individual topics on film study focusing on a specific period (e.g., primitive era, transition to sound, post-World War II) or national movement (e.g., Italian neorealism, the nouvelle vague, das neue Kino, Latin American militant cinema). Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 373W: Special Topics in Film

Prerequisite: FILM 270 or consent of instructor. Individual topics on film study focusing on a specific period (e.g., primitive era, transition to sound, post-WWII) or national movement (e.g., Italian neorealism, the nouvelle vague, Latin American militant cinema). Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 374: Animation

This class explores the different facets of animation, including its history, theory, and techniques. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 375: The Russian Avantgarde

Knowledge of Russian is not required. Introduction to interdisciplinary study of 20th-century Russian literature and the visual arts, with focus on issues of art and politics, time, space and identity in symbolist, supermatist, constructivist, socialist realist and post-Soviet "vision". In English. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 376: Narrative Fiction Filmmaking I

Film Studies majors and minors only, and with the consent of the instructor. Hands-on introduction to technical and stylistic foundations of moving image production using a variety of film and video formats and to the economic and professional realities of narrative content creation for film. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270/107 as a Prerequisite.

FILM 377: Narrative Filmmaking II

For the duration of the semester each student authors their own substantial narrative film. Through workshop and critique students study advanced skills in the techniques, technologies and methods learned in FILM 107 and Narrative Filmmaking I. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 376 as a Prerequisite.

FILM 378R: Screenwriting

Prerequisite: FILM 270. A writing-intensive course in the construction and formatting of screenplays for upper-level undergraduates, which also broaches various aspects of pre-production planning. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

FILM 378RW: Screenwriting

Prerequisite: FILM 270. A writing-intensive course in the construction and formatting of screenplays for upper-level undergraduates, which also broaches various aspects of pre-production planning. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 379R: Advanced Screenwriting

An advanced writing-intensive course in the construction and formatting of screenplays for upper-level undergraduates, which also broaches various aspects of pre-production planning. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FILM 378 or FILM 378W prereq..

FILM 379RW: Advanced Screenwriting

An advanced writing-intensive course in the construction and formatting of screenplays for upper-level undergraduates, which also broaches various aspects of pre-production planning. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 378 or FILM 378W prereq..

FILM 380: Video Games

This course will serve as an introduction to the history, frm aesthetics, functions, and culture of video games, across their history from the first arcades in the 1970s to the networked, multiplayer, online, and mobile games of today. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 204 or FILM 270/270W.

FILM 381: Classical Film Theory

Introduction to the basic concepts that dominated what is known as \"classical theory\" in the work of Vachel Lindsay, Hugo Munsterberg, Bela Balazs, Lev Kuleshov, Sergei Eisenstein, V.I. Pudovkin, Rudolf Arnheim, Siegfried Kracauer and Andre Bazin. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 381W: Classical Film Theory

Introduction to the basic concepts that dominated what is known as \"classical theory\" in the work of Vachel Lindsay, Hugo Munsterberg, Bela Balazs, Lev Kuleshov, Sergei Eisenstein, V.I. Pudovkin, Rudolf Arnheim, Siegfried Kracauer and Andre Bazin. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 5. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 382: Contemp. Film & Media Theory

An extension of FILM 381 into the structuralist and post-structuralist era, beginning with the work of Christian Metz and extending through that of Jacques Lacan and Gilles Deleuze. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 383: Music, Film, and Politics

This writing-intensive seminar explores to what end music is used in political films. How does music affect our perception of political films? How does music manipulate our feelings for or against the subject matter?. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

FILM 383W: Music, Film, and Politics

This writing-intensive seminar explores to what end music is used in political films. How does music affect our perception of political films? How does music manipulate our feelings for or against the subject matter?. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 384: Literature & Cultural Studies

An introduction to the relationship between literary studies and the study of cultural theory and popular culture. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

FILM 384W: Literature & Cultural Studies

An introduction to the relationship between literary studies and the study of cultural theory and popular culture. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 385: Documentary Filmmaking I

This course introduces students to basic technical digital video film making skills (camera operation, lighting, sound recording, non-linear editing) and to interview techniques through weekly exercises and study of major, creative documentaries. Weekly studio lab sessions required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 386: Documentary Film Making II

Prerequisite: FILM 385. It will extend the students' knowledge of the field of documentary media production through the screening and criticism of film and video documentaries. Weekly studio lab sessions required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 387: Documentary Filmmaking III

Prerequisite: FILM 385 and 386. This course builds upon FILM 385 and 386 by deepening student knowledge of documentary mediamaking techniques. Students will complete a broadcast-quality television documentary while studying outstanding documentary films. Weekly studio lab sessions required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 388: Classical Hollywood Cinema

The structural dynamics of the studio system as both a film style and mode of production, with special emphasis on the development of narrative form. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 389: Special Topics in Media

Individual topics in Media Studies. Topics could include children and the media, an aspect of television, internet culture and identity, global media, and media convergence. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: FILM/ARTVIS/IDS 204 as prereq..

FILM 389W: Special Topics in Media

Individual topics in Media Studies. Topics could include children and the media, an aspect of television, internet culture and identity, global media, and media convergence. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5. Requisites: FILM/ARTVIS/IDS 204 as prereq..

FILM 390: Children & Media

Electronic screen media occupy vasts amounts of contemporary children\'s time in the US and abroad. This course will examine the role of media in children\'s lives starting with babies and toddles and moving through early and middle childhood and on to the \"tween\" and teen years. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 391R: Studies in Major Figures

An intensive, in-depth study of the work of a recognized major figure in world cinema in the class of Griffith, Dreyer, Ford, Renoir, Welles, Ophuls, Kurosawa, Godard, Antonioni, Hitchcock, or Scorscese. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 392R: Genre Studies

History and theory of one or more major Hollywood genres, such as the Western, the gangster film, the musical, the horror film, film noir, and science fiction and their international analogues (e.g., the American Western and the Japanese chambara film). Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 393: Documentary Film & Media Hist

The history of non-fiction film and media from the perspective of documentary film and media makers. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 394: Screening China

The course explores the history and development of Chinese cinema. It discusses "film in China" and "China in film" by focusing on the function of cinema and reconfigurations of time, space, gender, and history in Chinese films under different historical conditions since the early twentieth century. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

FILM 394W: Screening China

The course explores the history and development of Chinese cinema. It discusses "film in China" and "China in film" by focusing on the function of cinema and reconfigurations of time, space, gender, and history in Chinese films under different historical conditions since the early twentieth century. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 395R: National Cinemas

Close study of the development of a specific national or regional Western cinema (e.g. European, Eastern European) in terms of its aesthetic, theoretical, and sociopolitical dimensions. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 396R: Non-Western National Cinemas

Close study of the development of a specific national or regional non-Western cinema (e.g., Japanese, Indian, Chinese, African, Middle Eastern) in terms of its aesthetic, theoretical, and sociopolitical dimensions. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 399R: Internship

Variable credit; only four hours count toward major or minor. Need a department faculty advisor in advance. The internship must be at least 10 hours a week. Students must regularly meet their faculty advisor and complete writing assignments. Students must be a declared major/minor in the department. Credit Hours: 1-4.

FILM 401: Film and Media Criticism

A writing-intensive course in critical aesthetics for upper-level undergraduates, with a focus on the critical assumptions underlying various methodologies. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 401W: Film and Media Criticism

A writing-intensive course in critical aesthetics for upper-level undergraduates, with a focus on the critical assumptions underlying various methodologies. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 402A: K-12 Media Literacy I

First of a two semester sequence. Learn about media literacy, media education, and basic pedagogy. Become familiar with key theories, methodologies and practices. Begin forging relationships with students in the area through mutual writing and observation. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FILM 270 as prerequisite.

FILM 402B: K-12 Media Literacy II

Second of a two semester sequence. Apply knowledge gained in the first semester by teaching developed curriculum in the classroom and assessing student outcomes. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 402A as prerequisite.

FILM 403: The Biz

Examines American screen entertainment history, specifically the key trends, individuals, institutions and technologies that have shaped these different forms them from the 19th century through the present day. Students perform practical experiments in industrial analysis. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 404: Gender in Film and Media

Films, television programs, and other media forms analyzed in cultural, historical and political perspective with regard to how societal norms, visual style and aesthetics affect the representation of women and how women have used various media for self-representation. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 405R: Experimntl/Avant-Garde Cinema

An historical/theoretical survey of the experimental avantgarde as an alternative to mainstream narrative, with an emphasis on its wide variety of forms. May include a filmmaking component. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 406: Senior Sem:Film & Media Topics

A seminar in film and media historical methods for upper-level undergraduates that involves extensive reading and some primary research. Weekly screenings required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270/371 as a Prerequisite.

FILM 407: Content Creation

Students work with their peers and learn from established creative professionals to obtain critical perspectives on, and practical experience in, generating media content using technologies, techniques and models used by the media industries. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 270 as PreReq.

FILM 408: Media, Time and Space

This course compares depictions of temporality across a range of media in an effort to understand how particular media are suited to particular conceptions of time, what limitations particular media might have in depicting time and how media can enable new ways of thinking about temporal relations. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 411: Spec Project In Film Studies

A supervised project to be determined by the instructor and student in the semester preceding the project. Requires faculty approval prior to registration. Only four credit hours can be applied toward fulfillment of the requirement of the major. Credit Hours: 4.

FILM 473: Adv.Topics in Film & Media St.

This course is designed to give advanced students the opportunity to investigate intensively a specialized topic in film and media studies. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3-4.

FILM 479: Filmmaking Capstone

In this capstone course for seniors, students will create, direct, and executive produce a work that showcases their accumulated experience as filmmakers and film scholars. Students will advance their skills in film analysis, synthesis, directing, casting, and producing. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FILM 107 & 376 & 377 as prereq.

FILM 495R: Honors Thesis

Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program and approval of adviser. Open to students writing honors theses. This course fulfills the postfreshman year writing requirement. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

FILM 495RW: Honors Thesis

Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program and approval of adviser. Open to students writing honors theses. This course fulfills the postfreshman year writing requirement. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-8.

FILM 499R: Directed Research

A supervised project in an area of study to be determined by the instructor and student in the semester preceding the independent study. Requires faculty approval prior to registration. Only four credit hours can be applied toward fulfillment of the requirement of the major. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-5.

FILM 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Film. Credit Hours: 1-99.

French

FREN 101: Elementary French I

Every semester. This beginning-level French language course provides students with new perspectives on French and francophone cultures while building writing, reading, speaking and listening skills. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

FREN 102: Elementary French II

This course is open to students who have had some French (FREN 101 or two years in high school). It is designed to help students build proficiency in French reading, writing, speaking and listening in the context of cultural exploration. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FREN 101 as prerequisite..

FREN 170: Cultural Crossroads

Through images and texts, students are introduced to various aspects of the phenomenon of culture. The syllabus follows a generally historical order and highlights significant historical and political events that reflect and explain cultural divergence. In English. Credit Hours: 3.

FREN 190: Freshman Seminar: French

This freshman seminar will focus on themes in French culture from social history, the arts, and current information media. Cross-cultural comparisons provide a rich basis for discussion. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

FREN 201: Intermediate French

Every semester. Emphasis on oral and written communication skills. Assignments include a thorough review of French grammar, short readings, a French movie, and frequent short compositions. Prerequisites: French 102 or by placement. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FREN 102 as prerequisite..

FREN 202: Advanced Conversation

Based on authentic materials including video and Internet, this course will develop comprehension and oral skills by addressing a variety of cultural issues. Does not count towards the major or minor in French. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FREN 201 as prerequisite..

FREN 203: Advanced French

Emphasis on oral and written communication skills. Assignments include a thorough review of the fine points of French grammar, cultural and literary readings, French films, and frequent compositions. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FREN 201 as prerequisite..

FREN 205: Practical Conversation

Summer. Development of fluency in the spoken language through discussion of contemporary issues in French culture. Emphasis on increasing vocabulary and ease in the manipulation of grammatical structures. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FREN 101 and FREN 102.

FREN 209: French & Business Culture

Through case studies and authentic videos, this course focuses on the language of business, examining issues of cross-cultural awareness. Students practice listening, speaking, reading and writing as they prepare short presentations, role plays, and discussions. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FREN 201 as prerequisite..

FREN 210: Fren For Reading Comprehension

Intensive basic grammar course, with prose selections to develop the reading skill. This course is primarily for graduate students and has no connection with the undergraduate French language sequence. No previous knowledge of French necessary. Does not count toward the major or minor in French. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

FREN 213: Exploring the Cultural Unknown

This intermediate level course gives students the opportunity to further develop proficiency in four language skills- speaking, listening, reading and writing acquired during the first year of language study-- while exploring aspects of French and Francophone cultures of the 21st century. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

FREN 261: French for Health

By placing a great emphasis on grammar, oral and written comprehension, reading, and cultural knowledge, this course prepares students for the practicalities of using French within an international setting while introducing them to issues central to health communities in France. Credit Hours: 2.

FREN 310: Writing Skills

Third-year-level course given in French. Intensive study of written French based on syntactic and lexical analysis of a variety of texts. Bi-weekly compositions with extensive revisions and concern for the process of writing in a foreign language. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FREN 203 as prerequisite..

FREN 310W: Writing Skills

Third-year-level course given in French. Intensive study of written French based on syntactic and lexical analysis of a variety of texts. Bi-weekly compositions with extensive revisions and concern for the process of writing in a foreign language. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FREN 203 as prerequisite..

FREN 311: French Phonetics

Instruction and practice in the correct pronunciation of standard French, including work in transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FREN 203 as prerequisite..

FREN 312: History of France

Summer. Offered through Emory Summer Program in Paris. The history of France as seen through its art and architecture, with teacher guided visits to historical sites and monuments. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FREN 201 as prerequisite..

FREN 313: French and Francophone Culture

Every semester. Various aspects of contemporary French culture and society are studied through newspapers, film, and cultural documents. Discussions will be encouraged, and written skills perfected through short topical papers. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FREN 310 as prerequisite..

FREN 314: What Is Interpretation?

An introduction to the reading and interpretation of a variety of literary and cultural media including poetry, drama, prose fiction, political writings, publicity, films, painting, and architecture. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FREN 310 as prerequisite..

FREN 331: Temporalities

This course focuses on the development of key concepts, ideas, or movements across historical periods and cultural contexts. By retracing their elaboration it serves to highlight continuities and discontinuities in the historical development of French and Francophone literatures and cultures. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FREN 310 and FREN 314 prereq..

FREN 341: Intersections

Through a variety of texts and artifacts, including but not restricted to literature, travelogues, legal documents, medical, historidal, and political treatises, visual arts, students are introduced to specific interdisciplinary issues in French and Francophone Students. Taught in English. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FREN 310 and FREN 314 prereq..

FREN 351: Media and Genres

This course presents topics in French and Francophone studies through diverse media and genres in order to foster critical thinking through specific analysis. The course puts the emphasis on interpretative strategies that take medical forms and properties into consideration. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FREN 310 and FREN 314 prereq..

FREN 361: French Topics in Translation

A study of selected topics in French and/or Francophone literature and culture(s) through readings, lectures, and discussion in English. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

FREN 361W: French Topics in Translation

A study of selected topics in French and/or Francophone literature and culture(s) through readings, lectures, and discussion in English. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

FREN 371R: Study Abroad - EDUCO (Paris)

FREN 371 is a special course number reserved for certain language courses taken in Paris with the EDUCO/ Sciences Po study abroad programs through Emory College . May be used to count toward the major in French Studies. Credit Hours: 4.

FREN 381: Special Topics - Study Abroad

FREN 381 is a special course number reserved for certain courses taken in Paris with the EDUCO/ Sciences Po study abroad programs through Emory College. May be used to count toward the major in French Studies. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 1-4.

FREN 385: Individual and Society

This course will examine a variety of texts reflecting social myths about the relationship of individual and society in French culture. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FREN 310 and FREN 314 prereq..

FREN 385W: Individual and Society

This course will examine a variety of texts reflecting social myths about the relationship of individual and society in French culture. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FREN 310 and FREN 314 prereq..

FREN 391R: Francophone Studies

A survey of literary and cultural creations from the Francophone world, with a special emphasis on Africa, the Caribbean, and South East Asia. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FREN 310 and FREN 314 prereq..

FREN 460: French and Francophone Cinema

Films selected to analyze a range of topics reflecting the development of French and Francophone thought and culture and to familiarize students with visual, acoustic and narrative elements of French and Francophone cinema. Weekly screening required for extra credit. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FREN 310&314& 2-300 level FREN.

FREN 460W: French and Francophone Cinema

Films selected to analyze a range of topics reflecting the development of French and Francophone thought and culture and to familiarize students with visual, acoustic and narrative elements of French and Francophone cinema. Weekly screening required for extra credit. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 5. Requisites: FREN 310&314& 2-300 level FREN.

FREN 471: Topics in French Thought: Civ.

Taught in English, this course examines major French and Francophone intellectual developments, theoretical paradigms and critical methodologies. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: FREN 310&314& 2-300 level FREN.

FREN 471W: Topics in French Thought: Civ.

Taught in English, this course examines major French and Francophone intellectual developments, theoretical paradigms and critical methodologies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5. Requisites: FREN 310&314& 2-300 level FREN.

FREN 488: Topics in French

Courses will include the study of a variety of subjects in French and/or francophone literature and culture. May be repeated for credit. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: FREN 310&314& 2-300 level FREN.

FREN 488W: Topics in French

Courses will include the study of a variety of subjects in French and/or francophone literature and culture. May be repeated for credit. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 1-5. Requisites: FREN 310&314& 2-300 level FREN.

FREN 490: Honors Seminar in French

An advanced seminar on a topic in French literature or cultural studies, supplemented by relevant critical texts. Selective admission. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: FREN 310&314& 2-300 level FREN.

FREN 490W: Honors Seminar in French

An advanced seminar on a topic in French literature or cultural studies, supplemented by relevant critical texts. Selective admission. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FREN 310&314& 2-300 level FREN.

FREN 495A: Honors

Two courses, eight credit hours (of which only four count toward the major); both courses are required for college honors. Critical methods in analysis and interpretation of French literature, familiarization with bibliographic materials and methods of independent research. Selective admission. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: FREN 310&314& 2-300 level FREN.

FREN 495BW: Honors

Two courses, eight credit hours (of which only four count toward the major); both courses are required for college honors. Critical methods in analysis and interpretation of French literature, familiarization with bibliographic materials and methods of independent research. Selective admission. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 1-8. Requisites: FREN 310&314& 2-300 level FREN.

FREN 497R: Individual Directed Research

Every semester. Credit, two to four hours. For students concentrating in French. Registration for this course is permitted only in the semester in which the student expects to complete requirements. Credit Hours: 2-4. Requisites: FREN 310&314& 2-300 level FREN.

FREN 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in French. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Genedrqt

GENEDRQT ICMP: First Year Seminar - Complete

Credit Hours: -4.

GENEDRQT IICMP: First Year Writing - Complete

Credit Hours: -4.

GENEDRQT IIICMP: One Continuing Writing Reqmnt

General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: -4.

GENEDRQT IX: 1st Physical Education Waiver

Credit Hours: -1.

GENEDRQT IXCMP: 2nd PE Waiver - Complete

Credit Hours: -1.

GENEDRQT IXPFCM: Prin of Phys Fitness Waiver

Credit Hours: -1.

GENEDRQT VIIICP: Health Waiver Complete

Credit Hours: -4.

German

GER 100R: Elem German (Indiv Instruc)

Introduction to German language studies with an emphasis on the development reading, writing, speaking, and listening abilities. The course does not fulfill the HAL general education requirement. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GER 101: Elementary German I

Fall, Summer (Vienna). The first of the two-course sequence (101-102) that introduces students to reading, writing, speaking, and understanding the German language through an exploration of the different identities of young adults in the United States and the German-speaking world. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 102: Elementary German II

Spring, Summer (Vienna). The second of the two-course sequence (101-102) that introduces students to reading, writing, speaking, and understanding the German language through an exploration of the different identities of young adults in the United States and the German-speaking world. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 110: Intensive Elementary German

Spring. Credit, eight. Content identical with 101 and 102 but taught in one semester. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 8.

GER 190: Freshman Seminar

In-depth treatment of a topic in language, literature, or culture. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 192R: Beginning Conversation

Fall and spring. Credit, one. Opportunity for beginners to practice German. Credit Hours: 1.

GER 201: Intermediate German I

Fall, Summer (Vienna). The first of the two-course sequence (201-202) that explores how different societal factors have affected German-speaking young adults' coming of age and draws comparisons with English language cultures. Continued focus on development of students' German language abilities. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 202: Intermediate German II

Spring, Summer (Vienna). The second of the two-course sequence (201-202) that explores how different societal factors have affected German-speaking young adults' coming of age and draws comparisons with English language cultures. Continued focus on development of students' German language abilities. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 210: German for Read Comprehension

Fall. Intended for graduate students and others who wish to concentrate on learning to read German. No previous knowledge of German is required. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 211: Intensive - Inter German

Content identical to 201 and 202 but taught intensively in one semester. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 8.

GER 218: Nazi Germany

Course offers an overview of the origins, development, and outcomes of National Socialism. It covers: the rise of Nazi Party, establishment of dictatorship, emergence of racial state, life of Jews and social outsiders, road to war, WWII, occupation of Europe, resistance, euthanasia, the Holocaust. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 230: Yiddish Culture

A broad introduction to the history, literature, and film of Ashkenazi Jewish culture in Europe and America. All texts in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 285: Spec.Topics

Introductory study of issues central to the understanding of history, culture, and politics in German or Yiddish speaking countries. A given topic will provide the focus; the method of inquiry will be interdisciplinary. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 290: Supervised Reading

Supervised study in the reading of cultural and literary texts and/or other aspects of German cultural production. Course may be repeated with a different focus. Credit Hours: 1-3.

GER 300: Continuing Grammar and Comp.

Advanced study of grammar and stylistics; intensive practice in writing German. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 301: German Studies I

Fall. The first part of the GER 301-302 sequence, focusing on the changing portrayal of love in German cultural narratives (prose, drama, essays, poetry, film). The course introduces students to reading and discussing literary texts in German and is designed to foster academic writing in German. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 301W: German Studies I

Fall. The first part of the GER 301-302 sequence, focusing on the changing portrayal of love in German cultural narratives (prose, drama, essays, poetry, film). The course introduces students to reading and discussing literary texts in German and is designed to foster academic writing in German. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 302: German Studies II

Spring. Continuation of GER 301 in its thematic focus on the changing portrayal of love in German cultural narratives. Course materials include a variety of texts (prose, drama, essays, poetry, film). Introduces students to textual analysis and is designed to foster academic writing in German. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 302W: German Studies II

Spring. Continuation of GER 301 in its thematic focus on the changing portrayal of love in German cultural narratives. Course materials include a variety of texts (prose, drama, essays, poetry, film). Introduces students to textual analysis and is designed to foster academic writing in German. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 305: Personal Writing

Discussion of a variety of personal texts and practice of personal writing in its manifold forms, including autobiography, narrative, essay, or opinion piece. May include attention to reader reception and experimentation with expressing the self by relating emotions, experiences, and reactions. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 315: Nazi Medicine and Biology

This course examines medicine in Germany from 1933 to 1945 and the extreme examples of the excesses of modern medical culture it provides. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 315W: Nazi Medicine and Biology

This course examines medicine in Germany from 1933 to 1945 and the extreme examples of the excesses of modern medical culture it provides. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 318: Modern Germany

Political, intellectual, and social history of Germany since the eighteenth century. Particular emphasis on German unification, the Weimar Republic, and Nazi Germany. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 320: Business German I

Fall. Development of linguistic and communication skills needed in the transaction of business in and with German speaking countries, combined with an introduction to the major economic, political, social, and cultural factors affecting such transactions. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 321: Business German II

Spring. Continued development of linguistic and communication skills needed in the transaction of business in and with German speaking countries, combined with an introduction to the major economic, political, social, and cultural factors affecting such transactions. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 330R: German Prose

Reading, discussion, and analysis of selected works of prose fiction from the German-speaking world. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 330RW: German Prose

Reading, discussion, and analysis of selected works of prose fiction from the German-speaking world. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 331: German Drama and Poetry

Thorough analysis of poetic forms in historical perspective. Focus on selected poems and representative dramas from the enlightenment to contemporary experiments and on the act and art of reading. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 332: German Poetry

Close analysis of poetic forms using a variety of approaches. Focuses on literary, cultural, or historical interpretations of selected poems from the Middle Ages to contemporary experiments and on the act and art of reading. Includes attention to form, content, and context. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 340: German Film

Taught in English. History of German cinema and close analysis of selected films. May include silent films, New German Cinema, contemporary film. No knowledge of German language, history, culture, or background in film studies required. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 340W: German Film

Taught in English. History of German cinema and close analysis of selected films. May include silent films, New German Cinema, contemporary film. No knowledge of German language, history, culture, or background in film studies required. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 350: Great German Books

Readings and discussion of major works of German literature and culture organized around theme and/or genre. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 350W: Great German Books

Readings and discussion of major works of German literature and culture organized around theme and/or genre. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 360: Current German Issues

Taught in English. Interdisciplinary course with focus on current issues in German-speaking countries. Seminar format, with occasional lectures. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 369: Jewish Modernities

Explores encounters by Austro-German Jewish musicians and writers with ideas of modernity from 1900 through the 1950s, including responses to the Weimar Republic, the Holocaust, and postwar emigration. Cases studied include Gustav and Alma Mahler, Freud, Arthur Schnitzler and Arnold Schoenberg. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 369W: Jewish Modernities

Explores encounters by Austro-German Jewish musicians and writers with ideas of modernity from 1900 through the 1950s, including responses to the Weimar Republic, the Holocaust, and postwar emigration. Cases studied include Gustav and Alma Mahler, Freud, Arthur Schnitzler and Arnold Schoenberg. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 370A: The Austrian Experience

Summer (Vienna). Intensive study of Austrian culture within a historical framework. Lectures and discussions concern history, art, architecture, music, literature, and everyday life. For full details, see special brochure published annually. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 370B: The Austrian Experience

Summer (Vienna). Intensive study of Austrian culture within a historical framework. Lectures and discussions concern history, art, architecture, music, literature, and everyday life. For full details, see special brochure published annually. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 375: Spec. Topics in German Studies

Taught in English. An interdisciplinary course intended to provide in-depth study of formative elements, influences, and movements in German-speaking culture(s). May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GER 375W: Spec. Topics in German Studies

Taught in English. An interdisciplinary course intended to provide in-depth study of formative elements, influences, and movements in German-speaking culture(s). May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

GER 380: Topics in German Studies

Taught in German. An interdisciplinary course intended to provide in-depth study of formative elements, influences, and movements in German-speaking culture(s). May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GER 380W: Topics in German Studies

Taught in German. An interdisciplinary course intended to provide in-depth study of formative elements, influences, and movements in German-speaking culture(s). May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

GER 385: Topics in German Linguistics

An in-depth study of selected topics in German linguistics (e.g., History of the German language; Analyzing Contemporary German Discourse). May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GER 385W: Topics in German Linguistics

An in-depth study of selected topics in German linguistics (e.g., History of the German language; Analyzing Contemporary German Discourse). May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

GER 392R: German Conversation

Fall, spring. Credit, one. Discussion of current topics. May be repeated for credit. Required for German majors. Credit Hours: 1.

GER 401R: Media Studies

Aims to continue students' development toward advanced language proficiency by an in-depth study of the history of cinema or media, and a close analytics of selected films of digital media. Topic to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3-4. Requisites: GER 301&302 as Prerequisite.

GER 402R: Dichter and Denker

Aims to continue students' development towards advanced language proficiency by the intensive study of an author, genre, or period in literature or philosophy. Topic to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: GER 301&302 as Prerequisite.

GER 402RW: Dichter and Denker

Aims to continue students' development towards advanced language proficiency by the intensive study of an author, genre, or period in literature or philosophy. Topic to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 403R: Cultural Topographies

Aims to continue students' development toward advanced language proficiency by providing a historically informed overview of select German-speaking cities, places, or regions. Topic to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3-4. Requisites: GER 301&302 as Prerequisite.

GER 406R: Yiddish Studies

Aims to continue students' development toward advanced language proficiency by the in-depth, interdisciplinary study of the history, literature, and film of Ashkenazi Jewish culture in Europe and America. Topic to be announced to advance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GER 407R: Contemporary Culture

Aims to continue students' development toward the advanced language proficiency by an interdisciplinary inquiry of the formative elements, influences, and movements of contemporary culture and civilization. Topic to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3-4. Requisites: GER 301&302 as Prerequisite.

GER 408R: Transnational Studies

Aims to continue students' development toward advanced language proficiency by thematically exploring minority culture, including Jewish, Turkish, Afro-German, or exile literature. Topic to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3-4. Requisites: GER 301 and GER 302 as prereq.

GER 409R: Discourse Studies

Introduces students to the basic elements of discourse analysis, and then applied this methodology to German language communication in a range of contexts. The focus of the analyses will be on both the specific linguistic features and the cultural meanings of language use in communication. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: GER 301&302 as Prerequisite.

GER 409RW: Discourse Studies

Introduces students to the basic elements of discourse analysis, and then applied this methodology to German language communication in a range of contexts. The focus of the analyses will be on both the specific linguistic features and the cultural meanings of language use in communication. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

GER 410R: Music and Performance

Aims to continue students' development towards advanced language proficiency by the intensive study of music, theater, opera, or dance. Topic to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: GER 301&302 as Prerequisite.

GER 450R: Internship

Practical application of language abilities in a German-speaking professional setting such as high schools, companies, or governmental agencies of Switzerland, Austria, and Germany. Credit Hours: 1-8.

GER 460R: German Studies Seminar

Taught in English. In-depth study of issues central to the understanding of history, culture, and politics in German-speaking countries. A given topic (e.g., the Weimar Republic, 1968, Martin Luther) will provide the focus; the method of inquiry will be interdisciplinary. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 470: Topics:Ger Cult & Civilization

An interdisciplinary course intended to provide a comprehensive, historically oriented overview of the formative elements, influences, and movements of German culture and civilization. Taught in German. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GER 470W: Topics:Ger Cult & Civilization

An interdisciplinary course intended to provide a comprehensive, historically oriented overview of the formative elements, influences, and movements of German culture and civilization. Taught in German. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

GER 475: Topics:German Lit Translation

Taught in English. Intensive study of an author, genre, or period. Topic to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Recent topics include Thomas Mann, the experimental novel, the Grail, Faust, Portraits of the Artist. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GER 475W: Topics:German Lit Translation

Taught in English. Intensive study of an author, genre, or period. Topic to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Recent topics include Thomas Mann, the experimental novel, the Grail, Faust, Portraits of the Artist. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

GER 480: Adv Top in German Literature

Intensive study of an author, genre, or period. Topic to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Recent topics: German women writers, literature of the German Democratic Republic, the theater in Vienna, Brecht, the experimental novel. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GER 480W: Adv Top in German Literature

Intensive study of an author, genre, or period. Topic to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Recent topics: German women writers, literature of the German Democratic Republic, the theater in Vienna, Brecht, the experimental novel. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

GER 482: German Drama 18th & 19th Cent

In-depth study of dramatic forms from Enlightenment to Naturalism. May focus on one playwright, genre, period, or theme or provide an overview. May include the practice of reading aloud or the staging of a drama. Familiarizes students with genres, concepts, terms, and contexts of stage productions. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 493: Research Workshop

Intensive, hands-on research on a given topic in German-speaking culture. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GER 495A: Honors

Fall, spring. Critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of German texts. Acquisition of independent scholarly research skills to be applied toward an honors thesis. Credit Hours: 3.

GER 495BW: Honors

Fall, spring. Critical approaches to the analysis and interpretation of German texts. Acquisition of independent scholarly research skills to be applied toward an honors thesis. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

GER 497R: Directed Study

Variable credit. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of eight hours. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GER 498R: Supervised Reading

Variable credit, may be repeated for up to 12 Semester Hours. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GER 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in German. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Greek

GRK 101: Elementary Greek I

Fall. Introduction to the fundamental principles of classical Greek. Students will attain as rapidly as possible the ability to read and understand literary works. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

GRK 102: Elementary Greek II

Spring. Continuation of Greek 101. Further study of forms and syntax, followed by reading from one or more authors. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

GRK 110: Intensive Elementary Greek

An intensive introduction to the fundamentals of classical Greek grammar and syntax. Students will attain as rapidly as possible the ability to read and interpret ancient works in Attic Greek. Equivalent to Greek 101 and 102. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 6.

GRK 201: Intermediate Greek: Prose

Fall. A review of grammar and introduction to Greek prose through selections from one or more authors such as Plato, Herodotus, Lysias, and Xenophon. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GRK 202: Intermediate Greek: Poetry

Spring. Selected reading in Homer's Iliad or Odyssey, with attention to poetic art as well as grammar and syntax. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GRK 290R: Supervised Reading

Credit, one to four hours. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GRK 311: Philosophy

Reading of one or more works by philosophical writers such as Plato, Aristotle, or the Sophists, with attention to philosophical content and literary form. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GRK 312: Tragedy

Reading of one or more tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, or Euripides, with attention to language, staging, and dramatic form and meaning. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GRK 313: Historians

Reading of Herodotus, Thucydides, or other historians, with attention to historical aims, critical methods, and literary art. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GRK 314: Epic

Reading in Homer's Iliad or Odyssey, with attention to language, oral style, and poetic interpretation. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GRK 315: Oratory & Rhetoric

Reading of one or more works by the Attic orators, with attention to historical, legal, and literary issues. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GRK 316: Comedy

Reading of one or more plays by Aristophanes, with attention to the political background and dramatic conventions of old Attic comedy. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GRK 317: Lyric Poetry

Reading and discussion of lyric poems, chiefly by Catullus and Horace. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GRK 370: Spec Topics: Greek Literature

Topics will vary; the course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GRK 370W: Spec Topics: Greek Literature

Topics will vary; the course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

GRK 398R: Supervised Reading

Study in Greek under the direct supervision of a faculty member for students who have completed intermediate-level coursework in Greek. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GRK 411: Thucydides

Advanced readings in Thucydides History of the Peloponnesian War, with attention to historical aims and context, critical methods, and literary art. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GRK 412: Aristophanes

Advanced readings in one or more plays by Aristophanes, with attention to the political background and dramatic conventions of Attic Old Comedy. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GRK 413: Sophocles

Advanced readings in one or more plays by Sophocles, with attention to the cultural background and conventions of Greek tragedy. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GRK 414: Lyric Poetry

Advanced readings from the lyric poets of Archaic Greece with discussion of genre, myth, and poetic strategy. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

GRK 487: Special Topics: Greek

May be repeated as topic varies. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GRK 487W: Special Topics: Greek

May be repeated as topic varies. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

GRK 495R: Honors

Honors research in Greek under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Open by invitation only. Credit Hours: 4.

GRK 495RW: Honors

Honors research in Greek under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Open by invitation only. One semester of honors research can be used toward the College's Continuing Writing requirement. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

GRK 498R: Supervised Reading

Credit, one to four hours. Advanced supervised reading in Greek literature. Credit Hours: 1-4.

GRK 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Greek. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Hebrew

HEBR 101: Elementary Modern Hebrew I

First in a series of courses designed to teach speaking, writing, reading, and comprehension of modern Hebrew. No previous knowledge of Hebrew required. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

HEBR 102: Elementary Modern Hebrew II

Prerequisites: Hebrew 101 or permission of instructor. Second in a series of courses designed to teach speaking, writing, reading, and comprehension of modern Hebrew. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

HEBR 201: Intermediate Modern Hebrew I

Prerequisites: Hebrew 102 or permission of instructor. Third in a series of courses designed to teach modern Hebrew, with emphasis on grammatical structure and expansion of vocabulary; includes short stories, newspaper articles, and conversation. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

HEBR 202: Intermediate Modern Hebrew II

Prerequisite: Hebrew 201 or permission of instructor. Fourth in a series of courses designed to teach modern Hebrew with emphasis on grammatical structure and expansion of vocabulary; includes short stories, newspaper articles, and conversation. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

HEBR 290: Supervised Reading

Supervised readings in Hebrew. Credit Hours: 1-12.

HEBR 301: Advanced Modern Hebrew I

Prerequisites: Hebrew 202 or permission of instructor. Fifth in a series of courses designed to teach modern Hebrew, advanced study of grammar, vocabulary, and stylistics; intensive practice speaking and writing Hebrew. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

HEBR 302: Advanced Modern Hebrew II

Sixth in a series of courses designed to teach modern Hebrew, advanced study of grammar, vocabulary, and stylistics; intensive practice speaking and writing Hebrew. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

HEBR 302W: Advanced Modern Hebrew II

Sixth in a series of courses designed to teach modern Hebrew, advanced study of grammar, vocabulary, and stylistics; intensive practice speaking and writing Hebrew. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

HEBR 370: Topics in Hebrew

Close analysis of selected poetry or prose in Hebrew. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HEBR 370W: Topics in Hebrew

Close analysis of selected poetry or prose in Hebrew. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

HEBR 371: Readings in Classical Hebrew

This course intends to train students in close reading of classical Hebrew texts such as the Hebrew Bible, the Mishna, Pirkei Avot, and more. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

HEBR 415R: Reading Modern Hebrew

Designed especially to enable students with background in Biblical Hebrew to read modern publications in the field of Biblical studies. Credit Hours: 3.

HEBR 430R: Modern Hebrew Literature

Readings in modern Hebrew prose, poetry, and drama in the original, with emphasis on literary and social issues. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

HEBR 435R: Hebrew of the Israeli Media

Advanced study of the language used in the Israeli media; includes selections from newspapers, radio, and television broadcasts. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

HEBR 440: History of the Hebrew Language

Prerequisites: Hebrew 302 or equivalent. This course examines the development of the Hebrew language in different periods and in the framework of other Semitic languages using methodologies of historical linguistics and sociolinguistics. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

HEBR 497R: Supervised Reading

Prerequisite: Hebrew 302 or equivalent and approval of MESAS curriculum committee. Can be used for directed study of Hebrew literature in the original or for other interdisciplinary research in Hebrew. Credit Hours: 1-12.

HEBR 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in Hebrew. Credit Hours: 1-99.

History

HIST 100: Perspectives on the Past

This course introduces students to the academic study of History and the varied approaches historians use to make sense of the past. It explores the ways historians scrutinize evidence, use digital methods, analyze images, conduct oral history and borrow from other disciplines to study the past. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 145: The History of Now

The course offers students not only an overview of postwar European history but also introduces them to ways of analyzing current events in regard to their deep roots in the continent's past. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 150: Great Books: History

Part of Emory's Voluntary Core Curriculum. Certain great books have been influential across the centuries, and continue to influence the way we think, act, and understand ourselves today. Major themes of the course are the history of religion, politics, economics, biology, and psychology. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 170: Modern Jewish History

Jewish history in the last two centuries. Emphasizes Jewish development, emancipation, assimilation, identity, and changing status in Europe, America, the Islamic world, and Palestine/Israel. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 185: Spec Topics: History

An introductory course on a selected topic in history. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 185W: Spec Topics: History

An introductory course on a selected topic in history. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

HIST 190: Freshman Seminar

Introduces first-year students to the discipline of history, particularly historical sources and methods; aims to improve critical reading, analytical, and writing skills in small group discussion. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 195: Spec Topics:Transfer/Transient

Selected topics in History for students who transfer to Emory from a different institution or who take courses for transient credit outside of Emory. Maybe be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 196: Special Topics: Cross-listed

Selected topics in history for students in non-history originating (cross-listed) courses. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-3.

HIST 196W: Special Topics: Cross-listed

Selected topics in history for students in non-history originating (cross-listed) courses. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 199: Special Topics: Study Abroad

Selected topics in history for students in study abroad courses offered through Emory's Office of International and Summer Programs. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-3.

HIST 201: Formation of European Society

Examines the early forms of those societies that came to dominate the European continent and explores their early expansion and influence. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 202: The Making of Modern Europe

Examines major themes in European history during the modern era, roughly mid-seventeenth century to the present; special attention to conflicts in economic, political, social, and intellectual life. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 203: The West in World Context

Examines the interaction of European cultures with other world cultures, and considers that interaction's impact both on the "West" and on those regions it sought to dominate. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 204: The SilkRoad & Central Eurasia

Examines history of Central Eurasia as nexus commercial, cultural and political exchange in Eurasia from the Bronze Age to the rise of European Imperialism. Topics include: nomadic empires, oasis merchants, barbarians and empires, Buddhism, Islam, European adventurers, pre-modern globalization. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 211: Latin America: A History

This course explores the history of Latin America from European contact to present. Major themes include Latin America's position in a wider world; class, ethnic, and race relations; state-society relations; the making of regional and national identities. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 215: History of the American West

This course is a study of the American West between the Revolution and the early twentieth century. Themes include: Lewis and Clark, Indian wars, the fur trade, the Mexican war, the California gold rush, cowboys, the Mormon settlement of Utah, and transcontinental railroads. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 218: Nazi Germany

Course offers an overview of the origins, development, and outcomes of National Socialism. It covers: the rise of Nazi Party, establishment of dictatorship, emergence of racial state, life of Jews and social outsiders, road to war, WWII, occupation of Europe, resistance, euthanasia, the Holocaust. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 219: The First World War

This course explores the global military, diplomatic, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of the First World War. It engages with both recent scholarship and an array of textual and visual primary sources in order to understand the conflict and its transformative effects. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 221: The Making of Modern Africa

Traces the gradual incorporation of Africa into an expanding world economy and examines the impact of this incorporation on the development of African societies and modern nation states. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 231: Found of Amer Society to 1877

Considers the development of American society from tentative beginnings to Reconstruction. Special emphasis is given to certain critical periods including colonialism, the American Revolution, and the Civil War. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 232: Making of Mod Am:US Since 1877

The course introduces the social, political, economic, and diplomatic forces that have shaped modern America. Special emphasis on how diverse components of the American population have interacted in American society. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 238: History of Afric.Amer. to 1865

The course examines the experiences of African Americans from the emergence of the transatlantic slave trade to the end of the Civil War. Emphasizes social and cultural history and interpretation of race, class, and gender. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 239: Hist.of Afric.Amer. Since 1865

Examines African American history from 1865 to the present. Emphasizes regional, gender, and class distinction within African American communities, and the ways in which industrial transformations shaped African American life, thought, and resistance. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 239W: Hist.of Afric.Amer. Since 1865

Examines African American history from 1865 to the present. Emphasizes regional, gender, and class distinction within African American communities, and the ways in which industrial transformations shaped African American life, thought, and resistance. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 241: Topics in History and Text

The course demonstrates how literary, artistic, and/or cinematic texts, when understood in relation to the context of their production, can be used to study selected historical themes. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 241W: Topics in History and Text

The course demonstrates how literary, artistic, and/or cinematic texts, when understood in relation to the context of their production, can be used to study selected historical themes. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

HIST 243: Sex, Love, and Marriage

We will read some of the most entertaining works of literature written by Romans and by Greeks living under Roman rule: love poetry, novels, comedies, satires, and even Christian romances, and explore how ancient ideas of love and marriage differed and were similar to our own. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 246: Renaissance Women Writers

Renaissance women left an astonishing textual legacy ranging from letters, speeches and memoirs to poems, plays, and imaginative tales. This course uses selected texts to investigate how Renaissance women used writing to shape, interpret and comment on the world around them. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 246W: Renaissance Women Writers

Renaissance women left an astonishing textual legacy ranging from letters, speeches and memoirs to poems, plays, and imaginative tales. This course uses selected texts to investigate how Renaissance women used writing to shape, interpret and comment on the world around them. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 248: Origins of Capitalism

Our course will examine economic transformations and the forces that drove them between roughly 1650 and 1820, exploring how they laid the foundations for the modern world economy. Students will write short research papers on topics of their choosing. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 248W: Origins of Capitalism

Our course will examine economic transformations and the forces that drove them between roughly 1650 and 1820, exploring how they laid the foundations for the modern world economy. Students will write short research papers on topics of their choosing. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 249: Tropical Encounters

This course examines European encounters with indigenous peoples of the tropical regions, and the uses to which the resultant travel accounts and images were put back in Europe in disputes surrounding notions of race, the nature of humankind, and the practice of politics. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 249W: Tropical Encounters

This course examines European encounters with indigenous peoples of the tropical regions, and the uses to which the resultant travel accounts and images were put back in Europe in disputes surrounding notions of race, the nature of humankind, and the practice of politics. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 251: Intimacy and Terror: Stalinism

Explores the repressions of the Soviet totalitarianism through the experience of those who lived through it. Taking a humanistic approach, this course will focus on autobiography, memoirs, letters, and diaries to explore average Soviet citizens' interior life during Stalinism. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 251W: Intimacy and Terror: Stalinism

Explores the repressions of the Soviet totalitarianism through the experience of those who lived through it. Taking a humanistic approach, this course will focus on autobiography, memoirs, letters, and diaries to explore average Soviet citizens' interior life during Stalinism. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 253: US Politics/Popular Culture

An introduction to the study of popular culture--movies, pulp fiction, music, and television--in the context of historical analysis. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 253W: US Politics/Popular Culture

An introduction to the study of popular culture--movies, pulp fiction, music, and television--in the context of historical analysis. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 260: East Asia: 1500 to Present

This course will emphasize transnational aspects of East Asian history, focusing on how the East Asian international system interacted with Southeast Asia, South Asia, Inner Asia, as well as with Europe and the U.S. from 1500 to the present. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 263: Plantation to Postcolonial

"Plantation America", stretching from the American South, through the Caribbean to northern Brazil, comprises a geographical area that, as its name suggests, was dominated by the economic system of plantation monoculture. This course will attempt two inter-related tasks: it will firstly survey the unity and variety of the plantation as a form of socio-economic organization; secondly it will explicate the unity and variety of the political and cultural forms that have evolved alongside the plantation. The course will be interdisciplinary in nature, using texts from history, literature and anthropology. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 263W: Plantation to Postcolonial

"Plantation America", stretching from the American South, through the Caribbean to northern Brazil, comprises a geographical area that, as its name suggests, was dominated by the economic system of plantation monoculture. This course will attempt two inter-related tasks: it will firstly survey the unity and variety of the plantation as a form of socio-economic organization; secondly it will explicate the unity and variety of the political and cultural forms that have evolved alongside the plantation. The course will be interdisciplinary in nature, using texts from history, literature and anthropology. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 265: Making of Modern South Asia

This course is designed to introduce students to important aspects of the colonial encounter on the Indian subcontinent. It is a survey of social and political movements that occurred during British colonial rule in India. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 267: The Civil Rights Movement

An exploration and analysis of the struggle for African American equality with an emphasis on the Civil Rights Movement's development, successes, failures and legacy. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 267W: The Civil Rights Movement

An exploration and analysis of the struggle for African American equality with an emphasis on the Civil Rights Movement's development, successes, failures and legacy. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 270: Survey Of Jewish History

This course offers a general overview of the history of Jews and Judaism, beginning with the Biblical period and ending with modern times. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 278: Revolutions & Republics: China

Spanning the period that covers the First Sino-Japanese War (1895) through present, this course will explore the major transformations reshaping and reinventing cultural, political, and economic life in China through the shifting meanings of "revolution" and "republic.". General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 279W: Post-Mao? China After 1976

This course introduces students to the history, culture, society, and politics of China since 1976 through an exploration of the continuities and discontinuities knitting pre and post 1976 China. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 285: Topics: Historical Analysis

An introductory course on the nature and methods of history. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 285W: Topics: Historical Analysis

An introductory course on the nature and methods of history. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

HIST 295: Spec.Topics:Transfer/Transient

Selected topics in History for students who transfer to Emory from a different institution or who take courses for transient credit outside of Emory. Maybe be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 296: Special Topics: Cross-listed

Selected topics in history for students in non-history originating (cross-listed) courses. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-3.

HIST 296W: Special Topics: Cross-listed

Selected topics in history for students in non-history originating (cross-listed) courses. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 299: Special Topics: Study Abroad

Selected topics in history for students in study abroad courses offered through Emory's Office of International and Summer Programs. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-3.

HIST 301: Greek World:Achilles to Alex.

Illuminates through art, literature, and archaeology the unfolding of the first European civilization, which gave rise to many enduring aspects of our world, including philosophy, natural science, urban planning, and the art of government. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 301W: Greek World:Achilles to Alex.

Illuminates through art, literature, and archaeology the unfolding of the first European civilization, which gave rise to many enduring aspects of our world, including philosophy, natural science, urban planning, and the art of government. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 302: History of Rome

History of Rome and its civilization from earliest times to the accession of Constantine. Traces Rome's evolution from small town to world empire and the development of the arts and manners of the Greco-Roman world. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 303: History of Byzantine Empire

History of the Byzantine Empire from Justinian to the fall of Constantinople in 1453. Explores artistic, religious, and political achievements of one of the most magnificent and little-known civilizations in the Western tradition. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 304: Emperors, Barbarians, & Monks

This course covers the period 200-900 CE/AD and focuses on political, social and religious change in the late Roman empire and early medieval Europe. Topics include: the rise of Christianity, the fall of Rome and the barbarian invasions of the 4th-7th centuries. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 305: High Middle Ages: 1000-1350

Analyzes social, cultural, and political developments in medieval western Europe from circa 1000 to circa 1350, mainly through discussion of primary sources, including poems, biographies, histories, letters, and legal documents. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 306: The Italian Renaissance

History 201 recommended as background. Examines developments in politics, society, and the economy that created a new cultural style in Italy between 1350 and 1530. Students have the option of some readings in Italian. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 307: Europe:Reformatn - Enlightenmt

History 201 recommended as background. Breakup of Renaissance civilization amid wars of religion, economic crises, constitutional struggles, and growing skepticism. Terminates with origins of the Enlightenment, based on new scientific and philosophical systems, and development of strong constitutional or absolutist states. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 308: Revolutionary France,1750-1815

Causes, events, and consequences of the Revolution in France, and spread of the revolutionary movement through the Western world. The personality, statecraft, military triumphs and defeats, and significance of Napoleon. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 309: Europe in the Age of Empire

Examines the growth of cities, the intensification of consumer culture among the middle classes, the revolutionary and ??mass?? politics of (and directed at) the working classes, anti-Semitism, imperialism, and fin-de-siecle cultural crisis. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 310: Eur Era of Total War:1900-1945

Emphasizes social and cultural repercussions of the two world wars; origins of communism and fascism; and emergence of contemporary problems in European politics and society. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 311: Euro Nuclear Age: 1945-Present

Postwar renaissance in European politics and culture; evolution of communism and social democracy; and internal and international forces for stability and change in Europe today. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 312: Medieval & Renaissance England

Analysis of socioeconomic, political, and religious developments from 1272 to 1603. Topics include bastard feudalism, the Black Death, parliamentary government, the Reformation, Puritanism, and the Tudor state. Readings emphasize primary sources. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 313: Making of Britain: 1550-1750

A survey of key social, economic, and ideological shifts between the Elizabethan era and the British Englightenment. Topics include religious dissent, the origins and effects of civil war, English hegemony in Scotland and Ireland, science, law, and the growth of an imperial outlook. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 314: Topics: British History

Examines the fate of the different Celtic communities of the British Isles in response to growing English influence between the Middle Ages and the turn of the nineteenth century. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 314W: Topics: British History

Examines the fate of the different Celtic communities of the British Isles in response to growing English influence between the Middle Ages and the turn of the nineteenth century. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

HIST 315: Nazi Medicine and Biology

This course examines medicine in Germany from 1933 to 1945 and the extreme examples of the excesses of modern medical culture it provides. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 315W: Nazi Medicine and Biology

This course examines medicine in Germany from 1933 to 1945 and the extreme examples of the excesses of modern medical culture it provides. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 316: Modern France: History in Film

French history since the Revolution portrayed through feature film, with emphasis on the tensions between tradition and change in French politics and culture. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 317: Disease & City:Hist/Hlth Paris

The history of public health and disease prevention in France with special attention to Paris from the Middle Ages to the 20th century considers how epidemics reshape societies, how theories of disease causation change over time, how French ideals have influenced American medicine and public health. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 318: Modern Germany

Political, intellectual, and social history of Germany since the eighteenth century. Particular emphasis on German unification, the Weimar Republic, and Nazi Germany. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 319: Imperial Russia

Russian history from Peter the Great to the Revolution, with emphasis distributed among political, socioeconomic, intellectual, and cultural aspects, as well as external relations. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 319W: Imperial Russia

Russian history from Peter the Great to the Revolution, with emphasis distributed among political, socioeconomic, intellectual, and cultural aspects, as well as external relations. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 320: The Soviet Union

Elements of continuity and change in twentieth century Russia. Focuses on twilight of the Old Regime; the 1917 revolution and civil war; Lenin's dictatorship and Stalin's transformation; the impact of World War II; and post-Stalin conservatism. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 320W: The Soviet Union

Elements of continuity and change in twentieth century Russia. Focuses on twilight of the Old Regime; the 1917 revolution and civil war; Lenin's dictatorship and Stalin's transformation; the impact of World War II; and post-Stalin conservatism. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 321: Holy Roman Empire, 1500-1806

The Holy Roman Empire from Martin Luther to Napoleon. Topics include the Reformation, the Thirty Years' War, the rise of Prussia and Austria, and the German Enlightenment. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 322: Herod the Great

Herod the Great ruled Palestine between 40-4 BCE. He changed the face of the land by building magnificent structures, some still standing, across the land and the region. The course explores the historical-cultural backgrounds to this period, his successes and failures, and what motivated him. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 322W: Herod the Great

Herod the Great ruled Palestine between 40-4 BCE. He changed the face of the land by building magnificent structures, some still standing, across the land and the region. The course explores the historical-cultural backgrounds to this period, his successes and failures, and what motivated him. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 323: Reformation Europe

Examines the breakup of Christianity in sixteenth-century Europe. Analyzes political, social, and economic causes and consequences of religious change, as well as different theological viewpoints. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 324: Age of Religious Wars

Course examines the interplay of religion, war, and politics in early modern Europe. Major topics include Ottoman expansion, the expulsion of the Jews and Moriscos in Spain, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the French Wars of Religion, the Thirty Years War, and the rise of toleration. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 324W: Age of Religious Wars

Course examines the interplay of religion, war, and politics in early modern Europe. Major topics include Ottoman expansion, the expulsion of the Jews and Moriscos in Spain, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the French Wars of Religion, the Thirty Years War, and the rise of toleration. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 325: Classical Trad & Amer Founding

A study of the role of the Greco-Roman legacy during formative decades of the American republic and in shaping civic values in the United States. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 325W: Classical Trad & Amer Founding

A study of the role of the Greco-Roman legacy during formative decades of the American republic and in shaping civic values in the United States. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 326: Medieval and Muscovite Russia

Russian history from its beginning to Peter the Great: first appearance of Eastern Slavs, Kievan Russia, Mongol conquest, rise of Moscow, and Muscovy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 326W: Medieval and Muscovite Russia

Russian history from its beginning to Peter the Great: first appearance of Eastern Slavs, Kievan Russia, Mongol conquest, rise of Moscow, and Muscovy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 327: The Soviet World War 1939-1945

The military, political, economic, social, diplomatic and cultural effects of the Second World War on the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union experienced the worst casualties during the war and made the largest contribution to the defeat of Nazism. This class examines that story. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 327W: The Soviet World War 1939-1945

The military, political, economic, social, diplomatic and cultural effects of the Second World War on the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union experienced the worst casualties during the war and made the largest contribution to the defeat of Nazism. This class examines that story. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 329: American Jewish History

Survey of American Jewish history from colonial period to present, Jewish immigration to the United States, patterns of religious and cultural adjustment, social relations and antisemitism, Jewish politics, the construction of Jewish identities. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 330: Brazilian Cultural Imaginaries

This course will provide a firm foundation for understanding S??o Paulo's unique cultural identity in the Americas and for analyzing its history in a Brazilian and global context. The course it is designed to introduce students to key political and economic developmentsthat have influenced contemporary Brazil. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 330W: Brazilian Cultural Imaginaries

This course will provide a firm foundation for understanding S??o Paulo's unique cultural identity in the Americas and for analyzing its history in a Brazilian and global context. The course it is designed to introduce students to key political and economic developments that have influenced contemporary Brazil. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 331: Immigration and Human Rights

The course combines classroom and experiential learning to examine the history and current challenges of Latin American migration to the U.S. Students attend a seminar and work 3hrs/week with immigrants in schools, citizenship classes, family services, and legal advocacy organizations. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 332: Gandhi: Non-Violence & Freedom

This course introduces you to the complexities of Gandhi's thought and his political action, his spiritual heights and his idiosyncrasies. We will read Gandhi's own writings, which include his autobiography, his Hind Swaraj, and several seminal articles from his journal Harijan. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 332W: Gandhi: Non-Violence & Freedom

This course introduces you to the complexities of Gandhi's thought and his political action, his spiritual heights and his idiosyncrasies. We will read Gandhi's own writings, which include his autobiography, his Hind Swaraj, and several seminal articles from his journal Harijan. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 333: Russia in War and Revolution

This course will concentrate on the causes, course and consequences of the Russian Revolution from 1900 to the formation of the Soviet Union and Vladimir Lenin's death in 1924. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 333W: Russia in War and Revolution

This course will concentrate on the causes, course and consequences of the Russian Revolution from 1900 to the formation of the Soviet Union and Vladimir Lenin's death in 1924. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 335: Diplom History U.S. Since 1914

Traces confrontations between the United States and Wilhelmine Germany, imperial preference Britain, Japan, the Soviet Union, and revolutionary new societies. Interacting domestic and international forces are emphasized. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 336: US Women's Multicultrl History

Examines the lives of diverse groups of women in the United States in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, focusing on race, class, ethnic, and regional differences among women. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 338: Jews of Eastern Europe

On the eve of the Holocaust, a majority of world Jewry lived in Eastern Europe (esp.Poland, USSR).This course explores the origins, dynamic growth, and near destruction of East European Jewry from the Middle Ages to the Holocaust and the challenges to Jewish life in this region in the post-WWII era. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 338W: Jews of Eastern Europe

On the eve of the Holocaust, a majority of world Jewry lived in Eastern Europe (esp.Poland, USSR).This course explores the origins, dynamic growth, and near destruction of East European Jewry from the Middle Ages to the Holocaust and the challenges to Jewish life in this region in the post-WWII era. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 341: Era of the American Revolution

Examines the intellectual and social context of the American Revolution. Issues covered include the causes and development of revolutionary sentiment, the military conflict, diplomacy, economics, and American constitutional government. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 342: The Old South

Examines the South from its colonial origins to the Civil War, with emphasis on the social, political, and economic development of a slave society. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 344: American Environmental History

History of the relationship between the American people, land, weather, and natural resources, with special attention to the environmental movement since 1960. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 345: United States Since 1945

An examination of modern America as a legacy of the New Deal and World War II. Attention given to political, diplomatic, economic, and sociocultural aspects, with emphasis on reform traditions, national security concerns, and presidential leadership. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 347: The Industrial Revolution

Humanity has become more productive, wealthier, and healthier than ever before in the last 250 years. Many of these achievements can be traced to the industrial revolution, which began in Britain, spread to Western Europe and the United States, and now is being emulated through much of the world. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 348: Ethnic Experience in America

African Americans, Indians, Irish, and Jews in recent American history. Explores patterns of immigration and the limits of assimilation. Also treats anti-ethnic reactions such as racism and anti-Semitism. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 349: The New South

The agrarian South and the growth of an industrial ideal, segregation, dilemmas of political reform, race and politics, assaults upon segregation and its defenders, and modernization and change. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 350: East Asian Martial Arts

East Asian martial arts are often portrayed as ancient, timeless, and even mystical, but they have a history. In this course we explore how military techniques intended for use in war, policing, and banditry came to be practiced as methods of moral, spiritual, and physical self-cultivation. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 350W: East Asian Martial Arts

East Asian martial arts are often portrayed as ancient, timeless, and even mystical, but they have a history. In this course we explore how military techniques intended for use in war, policing, and banditry came to be practiced as methods of moral, spiritual, and physical self-cultivation. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 351: Topics:Non-US Economic History

Topics related to economic change outside the United States or in which the U.S. is only one area of comparison. Slave trade, global economies, economic thought, colonialism, or comparative economic systems. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 351W: Topics:Non-US Economic History

Topics related to economic change outside the United States or in which the U.S. is only one area of comparison. Slave trade, global economies, economic thought, colonialism, or comparative economic systems. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

HIST 352: European Economic History II

Economic development in the nineteenth century and the spread of a world economy; economic consequences of the world wars; economic aspects of socialism and fascism; and economic nationalism and internationalism in the twentieth century. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 353: History of Rape in Wartime

This course examines the history of rape in major wars in the twentieth century to the present. We will learn about sexual violence in WWI the Holocaust, WW2, Vietnam, the civil war in Yugoslavia, and today's wars. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 353W: History of Rape in Wartime

This course examines the history of rape in major wars in the twentieth century to the present. We will learn about sexual violence in WWI the Holocaust, WW2, Vietnam, the civil war in Yugoslavia, and today's wars. A research paper is a key component of the course. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 354: US Legal & Constitutional Hist

Examines the place and significance of law and lawyers in American history and the evolution of the Constitution from Marshall to Burger. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 355: Politcl Economy:American South

Economic history of the American South from the colonial era to the present. Topics include the development of the antebellum economy, Reconstruction, and the twentieth-century resurgence of the Southern economy. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 and BUS 201 as Prereq.

HIST 355W: Politcl Economy:American South

Economic history of the American South from the colonial era to the present. Topics include the development of the antebellum economy, Reconstruction, and the twentieth-century resurgence of the Southern economy. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ECON 101 and BUS 201 as Prereq.

HIST 356: Devlpmnt. of Mod U.S. Economy

Examines the post-1800 development of industrial America. Topics covered include the rise of manufacturing, banking, the labor movement, agriculture, and foreign trade. Special attention is paid to the role of the government sector in the economy. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ECON 101 and BUS 201 as Prereq.

HIST 357: Drugs & American Culture

Course examines 20th century U.S. history via the century's most notable pharmaceutical drugs. Covers changing definitions and expectations of drugs; influence of race, gender, class, and culture on drug use and promotion; and relationship between drugs and the definition of disease over time. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 357W: Drugs & American Culture

Course examines 20th century U.S. history via the century's most notable pharmaceutical drugs. Covers changing definitions and expectations of drugs; influence of race, gender, class, and culture on drug use and promotion; and relationship between drugs and the definition of disease over time. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 358: War and Chinese Society

How did war transform Chinese society? From 1937-1949, China was engulfed in war. Using a wide range of primary and secondary sources, we explore both the major players and problems in wartime China, as well as the longterm social and cultural implications of war and society. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 358W: War and Chinese Society

How did war transform Chinese society? From 1937-1949, China was engulfed in war. Using a wide range of primary and secondary sources, we explore both the major players and problems in wartime China, as well as the longterm social and cultural implications of war and society. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 359: American Routes

Explores the variety of traditional musical cultures in the United States, their historical and geographical influences on each other, and their influences on contemporary popular music. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 360: Mexico: Aztecs to Narcos

This course examines 500 plus years of Mexican history, from the Aztec Empire to today's "Narco State." Major themes include empire; colonialism; neocolonialism; class and ethnic relations; modernization; popular resistance; revolution; national identity; migration; neoliberalism; and drug trafficking. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 361: Brazil: Country of the Future

Covering the history of Brazil since Portuguese colonization, this course addresses conquest, colonial structures and legacies, questions of race and identity, political institutions, and migration. Themes include slavery, cultural diversity, economic development, and Brazil's role in the world. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 362: History of the Caribbean

Development of the major islands of Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico, from colonial times to the present. Emphasizes evolution of plantation societies, slavery and race relations, international rivalries, economic dependence, political independence, and social revolutions. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 362W: History of the Caribbean

Development of the major islands of Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico, from colonial times to the present. Emphasizes evolution of plantation societies, slavery and race relations, international rivalries, economic dependence, political independence, and social revolutions. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 363: Sugar and Rum

Sugar and rum were for centuries the quintessential Caribbean products, commodities which created fortunes for planters and merchants, while changing the lifestyles of the European working classes. This class will examine not only the development of sugar and rum production and its effect on the Caribbean??s socio-economic organization in the form of the plantation, but also how these commodities have come to define social status in the metropolis through changing patterns of consumption. Students will use materials from a variety of genres and disciplines, from social history to advertising, and from anthropology to popular music and film. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 363W: Sugar and Rum

Sugar and rum were for centuries the quintessential Caribbean products, commodities which created fortunes for planters and merchants, while changing the lifestyles of the European working classes. This class will examine not only the development of sugar and rum production and its effect on the Caribbean??s socio-economic organization in the form of the plantation, but also how these commodities have come to define social status in the metropolis through changing patterns of consumption. Students will use materials from a variety of genres and disciplines, from social history to advertising, and from anthropology to popular music and film. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 364: Afric.Civilztn.Tranatl.Slave

Political, social, economic, and cultural history of sub-Saharan African civilizations, from the rise of the Sudanic empires through the impact of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 364W: Afric.Civilztn.Tranatl.Slave

Political, social, economic, and cultural history of sub-Saharan African civilizations, from the rise of the Sudanic empires through the impact of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 366: Afghanistan and Central Asia

Survey of the history, cultures, and religions of Afghanistan and Central Asia including Tibet from antiquity to modern times. Topics will include the Silk Road, Buddhist, Christian, and Islamic cultures of the religion, and medieval, colonial, and modern history and politics. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 367: The Making of South Africa

Evolution of South Africa from a society based on the principle of systematic racial segregation to a multiracial democracy. Origins of racial segregation and apartheid, nationalist struggles, challenges of post-apartheid development. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 368: Latin American Landscapes

This course explores the history of the environment in Latin America from the pre-Colombian period through the present. It covers the physical and cultural transformation of landscapes across the region, linking environmental change to culture, economics, politics, and ideology. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 369: The Near East: 1914 to Present

Topics include the fall of the Ottoman Empire; British presence and departure from Egypt; World War I diplomacy; the rise and development of Arab nationalism; the emergence of the Arab states of Turkey, Iran, Israel, and the Arabian peninsula countries; Islamic resurgence; inter-Arab political history; oil; and the Arab-Israeli conflict. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 370: History of Modern Israel

Evolution and growth of Israel. Equal emphasis on Ottoman Palestine and on the mandatory and Israeli statehood periods. Topics include Zionism, Arab-Jewish relations, the British colonial presence, Israeli domestic issues, and foreign policy. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 371: Medieval & Early Modern Japan

An introductory survey of medieval and early modern Japan (1100-1850), covering the Kamakura and Muromachie shogunates, the warring states era, and the Tokugawa periods. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 372: History of Modern Japan

An introductory survey of modern Japan (1850-1950), covering the late Tokugawa shogunate, the creation of the Meiji state, and the rise and fall of the Japanese empire. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 373: History of Modern China

China since the Opium War. Nineteenth-century dynastic decline, Western impact, and modernization efforts; Republican, Nationalist, and Communist revolutions of the twentieth century; and the development of the People's Republic of China since 1949. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 374: Choson: Last Dynasty of Korea

This course is designed to take a comprehensive look at the social, political, cultural, and material lives of Choson Korea (1392-1910). This course aims to familiarize students with the core issues in Choson historiography, which will eventually help students to enrich their own research. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 374W: Choson: Last Dynasty of Korea

This course is designed to take a comprehensive look at the social, political, cultural, and material lives of Choson Korea (1392-1910). This course aims to familiarize students with the core issues in Choson historiography, which will eventually help students to enrich their own research. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 375: The Pacific War: 1941-1945

Land, sea, and air campaigns of the Japanese American conflict. Attention also given to home front factors, representative personalities, and roles of China and the British Commonwealth. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 376: Euro Intellect Hist:1789-1880

A close reading of primary texts. Topics include reactions to the French Revolution, German idealism, romanticism, English liberalism, Marxism, and the ??unofficial opposition?? of Flaubert, Dostoyevsky, and Nietzsche. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 377: Euro Intellectual History/1880

A close reading of primary texts. Topics include reactions to positivism, avant-garde culture, flirtations with communism, existentialism, structuralism, feminism, and postmodernism. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 377W: Euro Intellectual History/1880

A close reading of primary texts. Topics include reactions to positivism, avant-garde culture, flirtations with communism, existentialism, structuralism, feminism, and postmodernism. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 381: Race & the American Presidency

This course explores the historical relationship between Blacks and chief executives and the range of presidential attitudes and actions pertaining to the problems of slavery and emancipation, segregation, discrimination, and economic exploitation. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 382: Race & American Political Dev

This course explores the ideological and structural foundations of race in American political culture. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 383: The Arab-Israeli Conflict

Progression of the conflict from the 19th century to the present is reviewed in a multidisciplinary manner. Topics include political history, communal disparities, and the various wars and their diplomatic outcomes. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 384: Slavery in US Hist & Culture

An in-depth study of the current historical knowledge of 19th century slavery in the southern United States; and how slavery has been depicted in popular culture, films and literature in the 20th and 21st centuries. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 385: Spec Topics: History

Selected topics in history for advanced students. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 385W: Spec Topics: History

Selected topics in history for advanced students. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

HIST 386: Seminar on the Holocaust

An analysis of the sociopolitical background and the horror of the Holocaust, followed by the popular as well as the theological responses of the Jewish and Christian communities. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 387RW: GA Civil Rights Cold Cases

Intermediate level workshop in writing and researching Southern Georgia's Civil Rights history. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 395: Spec.Topics:Transfer/Transient

Selected topics in History for students who transfer to Emory from a different institution or who take courses for transient credit outside of Emory. Maybe be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 396: Special Topics: Cross-listed

Selected topics in history for students in non-history originating (cross-listed) courses. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-3.

HIST 396W: Special Topics: Cross-listed

Selected topics in history for students in non-history originating (cross-listed) courses. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 398R: Research Tutorial

Variable credit. Prerequisite: approval of project by instructor. Focused on students' pursuing projects of their own design or gaining research skills through work with the instructor. Credit Hours: 1-3.

HIST 398RW: Research Tutorial

Variable credit. Prerequisite: approval of project by instructor. Focused on students' pursuing projects of their own design or gaining research skills through work with the instructor. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 399: Special Topics: Study Abroad

Selected topics in history for students in study abroad courses offered through Emory's Office of International and Summer Programs. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-3.

HIST 401W: Alexander:Life, Legacy, Legend

Jr/Sr Colloquium. The course covers: 1) the life and career of Alexander III (`The Great??) of Macedon 2) the legacy of Alexander??s conquests in the ancient Mediterranean world 3) the legends of Alexander??s exploits from various cultures, in various media, ancient and modern. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 403W: Roman Imperialism

"Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course takes an in-depth look at ancient Rome as an imperial power, from the late second century BCE, after the Romans had defeated all their external enemies, to the extension of Roman citizenship to all free inhabitants of the Empire in the early third century. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 404W: Women and the Family in Rome

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course looks at women and family relations in Rome, including the relationship between law and "real life" and the use of legal texts for doing social history. Topics include: marriage and divorce, parent/child relations, and slaves and freed people in the household. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 407W: Love & Sex Renaissance Europe

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course uses the social practices associated with courtship, marriage, and sexuality in Renaissance Europe (1400 to 1600) as a lens through which to view the cultural values, legal systems and lived experiences of the period. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 409W: Mozart's World, Mozart's Women

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course uses Mozart's biography, personal letters, and operas as vehicles for exploring themes in European cultural history on the eve of the French Revolution. Special attention is given to the shifting perceptions of women that marked the period. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 411W: Jane Austen's World

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course looks at global history through the works of Jane Austen. It treats new gender roles, imperialism and the material life of the era. Students write research papers on topics of their choosing to meet the department and College requirements. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 412W: Music and Politics

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the connections between music and politics since 1750. Students will write independent research papers on topics of their choosing, using professional formats, strong evidence, and polished prose. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 414W: Facing French Rev:Germany/GB

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course examines European politics and culture in the years immediately following the French Revolution. To do so it explores a broad spectrum of British and German textual and visual sources from the multiple perspectives of political, intellectual, and cultural history. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 417W: Germany after 1945

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course explores the history of Germany after 1945, paying special attention to the circumstances under which two independent German states emerged and how they developed diverging societies and independent policies during the Cold War. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 420W: Stalin & Stalinism

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This class will study not simply the rise and rule of Iosef Stalin??one of the Twentieth Century's most sanguinary rulers-but also the deep social, political and cultural revolutions he wrought that still shape post-Soviet Russia and the world. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 421W: The Soviet Gulag

Jr/Sr Colloquium. Investigates he most infamous symbol of Soviet Communism, the forced-labor camps-the Gulags. From the intake of millions of "dekulakized" peasants to the killing fields of wartime Gulag to the Party's ""purged,"" the Gulag evolved and had a history. Here, we focus on that history. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 422W: Women in Russia

Jr/Sr Colloquium. Concentrate on the experience of women across the broad scope of Russian history. Will investigate women's roles in the Russian aristocracy, serfdom, revolutionary movement, Communist state and post-Soviet embrace of capitalism and gender subordination. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 423W: Islam in Russia

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course will examine Russia and its Muslims over a long chronological span (with particular emphasis on the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries) and broad geographical focus (the Volga, the Caucasus and Central Asia, as well as the Russian heartland). General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 426W: Gender & Modern Jewish History

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This seminar will explore gender and sexuality in modern Jewish society and culture, and ask how modernity affected marriage, love, education, and family. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 427W: The Modern Blood Libel

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This seminar will explore continuities and innovations between the medieval and modern blood libels, especially how the modern accusation was a product of post-Enlightenment politics, fears, and conventional social knowledge. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 438W: Professions in U.S. History

Jr/Sr Colloquium. The Colloquium will consider the origins, development, and meaning of the professions in America from the Revolution to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the evoluion of professional lawyers, doctors, ministers, artists, and sports figures. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 441W: Jimmy Carter's America

Jr./Sr. Colloquium. A research seminar that examines the life and times of President Jimmy Carter. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 443W: Crime/Punishment in US Culture

Jr./Sr. Colloquium. A study of the cultural and historical causes of the punitive turn in the United States, the ratcheting up of incarceration and other forms of punishment in the late 20th century. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 449W: Uncovering Emory's Past

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This seminar will provide an opportunity for students to master and apply the techniques of historical research, analysis, and writing through an exploration of the history of Emory University from its founding as Emory College in 1836 to the present. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 453W: China and the World

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course examines China's relations with and connections to the rest of the world, with a focus on China's relations with Europeans, focusing on the period 1400 -1911. It is a writing-intensive course, and the writing of a history research paper is the primary goal. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 454W: Global History

Jr/Sr Colloquium. Offers an introduction to the field of global history, focusing on key debates and historiographical interventions. The course also focuses on the production of a history research paper. It is recommended that students have taken at least one or two college-level history courses. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 456W: Capitalism and Anthropocene

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course is an exploration in world history, with a particular interest in how humans have altered planetary processes such as climate. A central issue will be understanding the historical development of capitalism. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 459W: A History of Hunger

Jr/Sr Colloquium. In the nineteenth century, journalists, activists, and policy-makers transformed hunger into a social problem. This course examines that history, tracking hunger's changing meanings over the past two hundred years. We take a global approach and choose key case studies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 460W: Race & Nation in Latin America

Jr/Sr Colloquium. Using in-depth case studies to guide us, we will unravel puzzles about race, ethnicity, and national identity in Latin America. They revolve around the central question: how have particular configurations of racial and ethnic hierarchy emerged in these countries?. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 463W: Cuba in World History

Jr/Sr Colloquium. This course addresses the impact of geo-political and global economic forces on Cuba, with particular attention to Spanish colonial policies, slavery and emancipation, the US presence, the Cold War, and post-socialist markets. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 466W: India: The Home and the World

Jr/Sr Colloquium. We study the history of India from the home, instead of the government or political leadership. What does the history of family and home tell us about changing roles and expectations, race and class hierarchies, social and economic advance, education, democracy and politics?. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 487R: Jr/Sr Colloquium: Europe

All history majors except those who complete the Honors Program must take two colloquia (HIST 487, 488 or 489). Each colloquium treats a special theme by reading, discussion, and writing of papers. Enrollment in each is limited to twelve; non-majors are welcome within space limitations. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 487RW: Jr/Sr Colloquium: Europe

All history majors except those who complete the Honors Program must take two colloquia (HIST 487, 488 or 489). Each colloquium treats a special theme by reading, discussion, and writing of papers. Enrollment in each is limited to twelve; non-majors are welcome within space limitations. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 488R: Jr./Sr. Colloquium: U.S.

All history majors except those who complete the Honors Program must take two colloquia (HIST 487, 488 or 489). Each colloquium treats a special theme by reading, discussion, and writing of papers. Enrollment in each is limited to twelve; non-majors are welcome within space limitations. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 488RW: Jr./Sr. Colloquium: U.S.

All history majors except those who complete the Honors Program must take two colloquia (HIST 487, 488 or 489). Each colloquium treats a special theme by reading, discussion, and writing of papers. Enrollment in each is limited to twelve; non-majors are welcome within space limitations. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 489R: Jr/Sr Coll: LatAm&NonWest Wrld

All history majors except those who complete the Honors Program must take two colloquia (HIST 487, 488 or 489). Each colloquium treats a special theme by reading, discussion, and writing of papers. Enrollment in each is limited to twelve; non-majors are welcome within space limitations. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 489RW: Jr/Sr Coll: LatAm&NonWest Wrld

All history majors except those who complete the Honors Program must take two colloquia (HIST 487, 488 or 489). Each colloquium treats a special theme by reading, discussion, and writing of papers. Enrollment in each is limited to twelve; non-majors are welcome within space limitations. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 494R: History Internship

Prerequisite: prior approval of instructor. Supervised learning experience in a history related job in a state, federal, or local historical agency. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: HIST course 200 level or above.

HIST 495A: Intro Historcl Interpret I

For honors students in history. Addresses historiographical and methodological issues, and offers practical guidance in thesis design and research, with details and emphases at discretion of instructor. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 495BW: Intro Historcl Interpret II

For honors students in history. Addresses historiographical and methodological issues, and offers practical guidance in thesis design and research, with details and emphases at discretion of instructor. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

HIST 496: Special Topics: Cross-listed

Selected topics in history for students in non-history originating (cross-listed) courses. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-3.

HIST 496W: Special Topics: Cross-listed

Selected topics in history for students in non-history originating (cross-listed) courses. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 497: Directed Research

For upper-level history majors with prior approval of instructor. Intensive research that results in the writing of a research paper of 8,000-10,000 words (30-40 pages) or scholarly equivalent. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HIST 497W: Directed Research

For upper-level history majors with prior approval of instructor. Intensive research that results in the writing of a research paper of 8,000-10,000 words (30-40 pages) or scholarly equivalent. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HIST 498R: Supervised Reading

Variable credit (one to four hours). For senior history majors who have permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HIST 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-equivalent transfer course in History. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Human Health Program

HLTH 100: It's Your Health

It is increasingly evident that individual involvement in personal health has profound benefits. This course provides students the opportunity to become involved in a personalized approach to health and well-being with strategic approaches for the implementation of a healthy lifestyle. General Education Requirement: HTH. Credit Hours: 1.

HLTH 105R: Translational Proj in Hmn Hlth

After completing HLTH 100, students may work on specific translational health projects within the Emory community. These intensive interactive experiences will be guided by student health mentors with faculty oversight. May be repeated for up to 3 CU. Credit Hours: 1-3.

HLTH 140: Explorations in Drug Discovery

For millennia, humans have relied on environmental resources like plants and animal products for their medicines. Some of the great scientific journeys that have contributed to the rediscovery of these important natural medicines provide a view on what it takes to find the medicines of the future. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 185: Special Topics: Human Health

Seminar or lecture series on topics of interest in human health at an introductory level. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HLTH 185W: Special Topics: Human Health

Seminar or lecture series on topics of interest in human health at an introductory level. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

HLTH 190: Freshman Seminar Human Health

Seminar on various human health topics. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 200: Peer Health Training

A course training students to be peer health partners for the HLTH 100 course. Strong focus on health education and working as a peer partner. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 205: Integrated Perspectives Health

This course offers students interactions and hands-on experience with a diverse group of individuals at Emory and in the community to expand their understanding of the science of health and to consider strategic approaches for the development and implementation of healthy behaviors and choices. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 207: Fundamentals of Epidemiology

Epidemiology is the study of disease patterns, and determinants, within a population and the application of this information to mitigate public health problems. Students will learn to apply basic principles of epidemiology and biostatistics to identification and analysis of public health problems. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 210: Predictive Health and Society

This course introduces the evidence base for the science of health and emphasizes STEM educational translations to the population, clinic and individual levels. Innovative efforts are needed to drive changes in health care from a reactive, disease-focused system to a proactive health-focused one. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 220: Intro.to Nutrition Science

This class focuses on the science of nutrition, with emphases on functions and interactions of micronutrients and how they affect human physiology, how dietary requirements for individuals and specific populations are developed, issues of food safety and policy are considered. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 141orCHEM141orCHEM 150.

HLTH 221: Contemporary Nutrition

The science of nutrition will be explored as it relates to individual food choice and overall health. Application topics include digestion, obesity, metabolism, sports nutrition, nutritional genomics, and predictive health. Nutritional needs will be addressed using a functional approach. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 230: Health and Humanities

Health is a fundamental human experience with multifaceted intersections in areas of humanistic inquiry. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 240: Integrative Health

Health is personal, encompassing a range of physical, emotional, mental, social, spiritual and environmental influences, influenced by culture. This seminar will consider the evidentiary base for alternative and complementary approaches to health and well-being. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 250: Foundations of Global Health

An introduction to the overall field of global health, its history, methods, and key principles, with case studies illustrating the burden of disease in nations with strikingly different political-economic contexts. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 260: French for Health

By placing a great emphasis on grammar, oral and written comprehension, reading, and cultural knowledge, this course prepares students for the practicalities of using French within an international setting while introducing them to issues central to health communities in France. Credit Hours: 2.

HLTH 261: French for Global Health

This course aims to introduce students to issues in Francophone global health and provide them with the necessary vocabulary and concepts to interact in French in a variety of health-related contexts. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 285: Topics in Human Health

Special Topics course. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HLTH 285W: Topics in Human Health

Special Topics course. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

HLTH 290: Special Topics Taken Abroad

Variable topics course in the study abroad program. Credit Hours: 1-8.

HLTH 300R: Peer Health Partners

This course provides students the opportunity to become involved in a personalized approach to health and well-being by sharing with peers strategic approaches for the implementation of a healthy lifestyle. Offered Yearly. Repeatable for up to Twelve Semester Hours. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: HLTH 200 as prerequisite.

HLTH 307: Epidemiological Methods

This course covers basic epidemiologic methods used in public health research. Topics to be covered include basic study design, measures of disease frequency, measures of effect, types of bias, and options for control of co-variates with an introduction to modeling. Credit Hours: 1.

HLTH 308: Practicing Epidemiology

This course covers basic epidemiologic methods used in public health research. Topics to be covered include basic study design, measures of disease frequency, measures of effect, types of bias, and options for control of covariates with an introduction to modeling. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 310: Defining Health: Biocult.Persp

Evolutionary perspectives provide a background for understanding the limitations imposed by biomedical frameworks in our understanding of human biological variability. Flexibility in gene expression and human phenotypes reflect the importance of biocultural influences on health. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 312: Predicting Lifespan Health

This is a research seminar exploring the intersection of genomics, the environment, and lifestyle/behavior as it pertains to human health from a developmental perspective with the aim of understanding human health over the lifespan. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 314: The Science of Sleep

Getting a good night's sleep is critical in promoting health and well-being. To better understand this link, we will examine how inadequate sleep may contribute to a range of disorders and examine current research efforts to understand why we need sleep and how the body regulates sleep. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 141 and 142 as Pre-Req.

HLTH 317: Microbiome in Health & Disease

Trillions of symbiotic microbes composing the human microbiota are crucial for our health. We will examine the vital functions provided by the human microbiome, as well as its association with disease states, including obesity, insulin resistance, inflammatory bowel disease, asthma, and more. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: BIOL 142 as prerequisite.

HLTH 320: Nutrition and Chronic Disease

Nutrition and Chronic Disease provides an overview of the role of nutrition in chronic disease prevention, development and treatment. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: HLTH 220 as prerequisite.

HLTH 321: Nutrition Across Life Cycle

This course examines the physiological basis for changing nutrient needs throughout the life cycle. Topics may include growth and development, nutrition assessment, age-specific dietary recommendations for optimal health and disease prevention, and sociocultural influences on dietary patterns. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: HLTH 220 or HLTH 221 as prereq.

HLTH 323: Nutrition for Exercise & Sport

This course addresses how nutrition helps individuals meet exercise goals, promote health, and achieve optimal performance through examination of the physiological roles of nutrients and dietary components, basic principles of exercise science, and conventional and contemporary fueling strategies. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 331: Disability & Bioethics

This course explores bioethical issues related to disability. Focuses on foundational theories of bioethics, disability, and disability studies and apply these to contemporary concerns. Examines traditional biomedical and bioethical perspectives, as well as those from disability studies literature. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 332: Health & Human Rights

This course will examine various human rights theories and apply them to issues related to population and individual health. The course will focus on human health as a human rights issue and relationships between health and other human rights issues, and environmental impacts on health/health care. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 333: American Healthcare Ethics

The goal of this course is to better understand and articulate our ethical views on the American healthcare system. The class includes an overview of classic ethical theories and principles, but focuses on the application of these theories and principles to a variety of healthcare contexts. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 340: Food, Health, and Society

Human health is intrinsically linked to dietary practices. The pharmacological properties of foods will be examined and case studies of dietary complexes will be examined in order to better understand the food-medicine continuum as a determinant of health and well-being. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 350R: Core Issues in Global Health

This course emphasizes core issues in global health, explores the identification of global health priorities, the nature of global health organizations and the challenges to finding and implementing solutions. The focus changes with the instructor. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ANT205/GHCS250/HLTH250 prereq..

HLTH 350RW: Core Issues in Global Health

This course emphasizes core issues in global health, explores the identification of global health priorities, the nature of global health organizations and the challenges to finding and implementing solutions. The focus changes with the instructor. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HLTH 351: Exporting Mental Health

This course aims to explore the issues that arise when placing Western concepts of mental health and disorder in non-Western cultures, psychiatric diagnoses as they are represented in various cultural environments and how people experience and interact within various psychiatric healing systems. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 357: Drugs & American Culture

Course examines 20th century U.S. history via the century's most notable pharmaceutical drugs. Covers changing definitions and expectations of drugs; influence of race, gender, class, and culture on drug use and promotion; and relationship between drugs and the definition of disease over time. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 357W: Drugs & American Culture

Course examines 20th century U.S. history via the century's most notable pharmaceutical drugs. Covers changing definitions and expectations of drugs; influence of race, gender, class, and culture on drug use and promotion; and relationship between drugs and the definition of disease over time. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

HLTH 360: Sant?? et bien-??tre

Not only is France pivotal in the scientific history of public health and modern medicine, but concepts of health are embodied in French life styles that are only now seeking articulation in modern health discourse. The class explores these cultural influences on health and health policy. Credit Hours: 4.

HLTH 362: Disease & City:Hist/Hlth Paris

The history of public health and disease prevention in France with special attention to Paris from the Middle Ages to the 20th century considers how epidemics reshape societies, how theories of disease causation change over time, how French ideals have influenced American medicine and public health. Credit Hours: 4.

HLTH 363R: Directed Study Abroad

France is the site of historically significant issues and discoveries in health. Students are offered the opportunity to focus on a topic of thei choice to pursue under faculty guidance while taking benefit of the environment that Paris offers for hands-on experiences. Credit Hours: 2.

HLTH 370: Health Policy

The course covers the US health care system, including the factors responsible for increasing health care spending, the purpose of regulation in the individual insurance market, the role of Medicare and Medicaid, and pros and cons of horizontal and vertical integration among providers and hospitals. Credit Hours: 2.

HLTH 385: Special Topics: Human Health

Seminar of lecture series of topics in human health. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit varies from one to four hours. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HLTH 385W: Special Topics: Human Health

Seminar of lecture series of topics in human health. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Credit varies from one to five hours. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

HLTH 390: Special Topics Taken Abroad

Variable topics course in the study abroad program. Credit Hours: 1-8.

HLTH 397R: Directed Reading

Variable Credit. Registration by permission of faculty supervisor and health program educational director. Credit Hours: 1-12. Requisites: HLTH 210 as prerequisite.

HLTH 399R: Directed Research

Variable Credit. Registration by permission of faculty supervisor and health program educational director. Credit Hours: 1-12. Requisites: HLTH 210 as prerequisite.

HLTH 405R: Trans Projects in Human Health

Students who complete Health 300 initiate science-based health projects while further developing mentoring skills. Projects are selected by faculty from proposals submitted in prior semester. Project teams may include students who successfully complete Health 100 with faculty guidance. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 2-4. Requisites: HLTH 210 as prerequisite.

HLTH 406: Psychoneuroimmunology

Stress is an interface between health and disease/ Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) is the study of the interface between the brain, behavior, and immunity. This course will provide an overview of current theories, empirical findings, and "hot topics" in the growing field of PNI. Credit Hours: 2. Requisites: BIOL 141 and 142 as Pre-Req.

HLTH 407: The Science of Stress

Acute stress can have protective properties while chronic stress can have detrimental effects on our health. This course will explore the physiological response to real and perceived stress to understand the mechanisms underlying these responses. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 410: Contemporary Health Challenges

Predictive health is a paradigm change in the science of health. This class focuses on the challenges posed by this changing perspective, and involves critical analysis and consideration of solutions to present day health issues. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ANT 231 or HLTH 210 as prereq.

HLTH 411: Many Diseases, Few Causes

A new science of health is emerging. The evolutionary background for generic processes will be discussed and the challenges posed by modern lifestyles will be the focus of this class. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ANT 231/HLTH 210+BIOL 141/142.

HLTH 412R: Predictive Health Internship

Internship by application only. Credit Variable. Credit Hours: 1-12. Requisites: Add HLTH 210 and HLTH 310 prer.

HLTH 414: Origins of Health

This seminar presentes data supporting developmental processes as an important basis for health and well being and addresses a way forward with which to confront the challenge of chronic diseases increasing globally. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: Add HLTH 312 or HLTH 411 prer.

HLTH 415: Future Health

This is the required capstone course for the Human Health major, to be taken in the final year. Students will be expected to undertake a focused project that will demonstrate proficiency from problem solving approaches to multidisciplinary aspects of health. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: HLTH 210 & HLTH 230 & HLTH 250.

HLTH 416: Genome, Exposome, & Health

This course aims to introduce students to emerging concepts and approaches for understanding human health and disease in terms of interactions between the genome and the exposome. Methodological aspects will be emphasized and a systems biology view will be presented. Credit Hours: 2.

HLTH 417: Concepts of Risk in Health

This courses considers the meaning and nature of risk in health from the viewpoints of epidemiology, society, and culture, in historical perspective. Discussion will focus on the definitions of risk, disease, and health and how the categorization of a behavior as a risk factor is determined. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: HLTH210/ANT231+HLTH230+QTM100.

HLTH 420: Mythbusters:Nutri Fact/Fiction

Nutrition is at the center of a cultural dialogue about health. The line between scientific knowledge and cultural ideology is increasingly unclear. This course will systematically cover many misnomers, myths and fads in our society in contrast to the science of nutrition. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: HLTH220 & BIOL141/CHEM141/150.

HLTH 430: The Nature of Evidence in MH

The nature of evidence, cases studies for clinical trials, informs classification and determination of mental health and mental illness. Psychological, neurological, historical, and cultural perspectives are considered in the context of an increasing public health concern with mental health. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: HLTH210/ANT231+HLTH230+HLTH310.

HLTH 440: Botanical Medicine & Health

Mankind has long recognized that plants are extremely useful as source of medicine. Medical traditions based on botanical sources are found in all human cultures and date back to prehistory. In this course both ancient and modern day botanical traditions across many cultures will be examined. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 450: Health, History and Culture

We examine issues affecting population health across time and place with tools from public and predictive health, and identify the influence of economics, politics, culture, and society on biomedical and epidemiological criteria of disease causality. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: HLTH210/ANT231+HLTH250+HLTH310.

HLTH 468: Colonial Medicine and Empire

This course explores a range of topics and texts related to the theory, practice and experience of medical matters in the Hispanic world of colonial-imperial medicine. Topics may include epidemics; gender and medicine; indigenous medical knowledge; diet and food; and doctors and curander@s. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 468W: Colonial Medicine and Empire

This course explores a range of topics and texts related to the theory, practice and experience of medical matters in the Hispanic world of colonial-imperial medicine. Topics may include epidemics; gender and medicine; indigenous medical knowledge; diet and food; and doctors and curander@s. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

HLTH 469: Medical Discourse in Latin Am.

This course examines how narratives about the body, health, medicine, and well-being are constructed, naturalized, and circulated in Latin America. Credit Hours: 3.

HLTH 485: Variable Topics Human Health

Seminar or lecture in various topics on human health. May be repeated for credit (up to 9 hours) when topic varies. Credit Hours: 1-4.

HLTH 485W: Variable Topics Human Health

An advanced seminar or lecture course on selected topics in health. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

HLTH 495A: Honors Research

This class is a requirement for students invited into the honors program during which they focus on their independent honors' research under the guidance of faculty. Credit Hours: 3-4. Requisites: HLTH 210 & HLTH 230 & HLTH 250.

HLTH 495BW: Honors Research

This class is a requirement for students invited into the honors program during which they focus on their independent honors' research under the guidance of faculty. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 3-6. Requisites: HLTH 210 & HLTH 230 & HLTH 250.

HLTH 497R: Independent Reading

Under faculty mentorship, students propose a focused research question and design a reading plan to explore the available evidence in depth through independent study. Students will write a semester paper which describes our current understanding of the topic and critiques the available evidence. Credit Hours: 1-12. Requisites: HLTH 210 as prerequisite.

HLTH 499R: Independent Research

Variable Credit. Registration by permission of faculty supervisor and health program educational director. Credit Hours: 1-12. Requisites: HLTH 210 as prerequisite.

HLTH 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-Equivalent Transfer Course in Human Health. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Hindi

HNDI 101: Elementary Hindi I

First in a series of courses that seek to develop listening, reading, speaking, writing, and cultural skills in Hindi. Primarly for students with no previous knowledge of Hindi. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

HNDI 102: Elementary Hindi II

Prerequisites: Hindi 101 or permission of instructor. Second in a series of courses that seek to develop listening, reading, speaking, writing, and cultural skills in Hindi. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

HNDI 201: Intermediate Hindi I

Prerequisites: Hindi 102 or permission of instructor. Third in a series of courses that seek to develop listening, reading, speaking, writing, and cultural skills in Hindi. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

HNDI 202: Intermediate Hindi II

Prerequisites: Hindi 201 or permission of instructor. Fourth in a series of courses that seek to develop listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills in Hindi. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

HNDI 301: Advanced Hindi

Prerequisites: Hindi 202 or permission of instructor. Fifth in a series of courses that seek to develop listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills in Hindi. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

HNDI 302: Advanced Hindi II

Prerequisites: Hindi 301 or permission of instructor. Sixth in a series of courses that seek to develop listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills in Hindi. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

HNDI 410R: Advanced Language and Culture

Study and discussion of written and audio-visual texts dealing with Hindi literature and literary traditions, as well as various aspects of Indian culture and society. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

HNDI 497R: Directed Study

Prerequisites: Hindi 302 or equivalent and approval of MESAS curriculum committee. Can be used for directed study of Hindi literature in the original or for other interdisciplinary research in Hindi. Credit Hours: 1-12.

HNDI 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-Equivalent Transfer Course in History. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Interdisciplinary Studies

IDS 190: Fresh Sem: IDS

Variable topics using interdisciplinary approaches from the humanities and social sciences. Topics represent current interests of the instructor. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 200: Interdisciplinary Foundations

IDS 200 examines the origins and development of distinct disciplines in contemporary universities through the lens of what counts as evidence in different fields of human knowledge. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 200W: Interdisciplinary Foundations

IDS 200 examines the origins and development of distinct disciplines in contemporary universities through the lens of what counts as evidence in different fields of human knowledge. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENG 223 as corequisite.

IDS 201: Top:Interdisciplinary Problems

IDS 201 examines the origins and development of distinct disciplines in contemporary universities through the lens of what counts as evidence in different fields of human knowledge. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-3.

IDS 201W: Top:Interdisciplinary Problems

IDS 201 examines the origins and development of distinct disciplines in contemporary universities through the lens of what counts as evidence in different fields of human knowledge. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-4. Requisites: ENG 223 as corequisite.

IDS 204: Introduction to Media Studies

Examines mass media (photography, film, music, news reporting, radio, TV, video games) through a variety of approaches in the humanities and social sciences. This course is required for the minor in Media Studies. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 4.

IDS 205: Science&the Nature of Evidence

IDS205 addresses: What is the nature of scientific evidence? How does it compare to other types of evidence? What counts as evidence in science? In other disciplines? What are the histories of the answers to these questions? How do they affect our everyday lives? Co-requisite: ENG 223. General Education Requirement: SNT. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 205W: Science&the Nature of Evidence

IDS205 addresses: What is the nature of scientific evidence? How does it compare to other types of evidence? What counts as evidence in science? In other disciplines? What are the histories of the answers to these questions? How do they affect our everyday lives? Co-requisite: ENG 223. General Education Requirement: SNTW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENG 223 as corequisite.

IDS 206: Foundations of Sustainability

Through readings, and discussions led by faculty from the social sciences, natural sciences, and humanities, this course provides a panoramic survey of sustainability; critical integration of these interdisciplinary approaches yields a strong foundational understanding of sustainability. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 207: Foundation Development Studies

Introduces students to the growing field of development studies and provides a solid foundation for subsequent course work in the Minor. Key topics include human rights, gender, environment, poverty and inequality, democratic reforms and governance, market reforms, rural development, and conflict. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 210: The Culture of The University

Introduces a wide range of approaches to cultural inquiry and an array of research techniques through the close examination of the university as an intellectual, political, historical, economic, educational, and social institution. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 216: Visual Culture

History of the use of visual images in Western culture. Study of tools necessary to read images, including still and moving images, performance, and display. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 216W: Visual Culture

History of the use of visual images in Western culture. Study of tools necessary to read images, including still and moving images, performance, and display. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ENG 223 as corequisite.

IDS 220R: ORDER Seminar

On Recent Discoveries by Emory Researchers (ORDER) engages graduate and postdoctoral students to teach their research to undergraduates. Recommended for sophomores; open to others. Refer to Course Atlas for specific topics of a given semester, articulated by the teacher-scholar team. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 220RW: ORDER Seminar

On Recent Discoveries by Emory Researchers (ORDER) engages graduate and postdoctoral students to teach their research to undergraduates. Recommended for sophomores; open to others. Refer to Course Atlas for specific topics of a given semester, articulated by the teacher-scholar team. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

IDS 250: Ethics of Leadership

This course surveys intellectual traditions of leadership and engages students in the form of leadership that is public scholarship. In addition to introducing students to forms and questions of leadership through readings in literature, philosophy, and history, the course will also introduce students to influential leaders who have a special relationship with Emory and the ILA. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 263: Intro to African Studies

Introduction to the African humanities and social sciences through in-depth study of three African regions. Explores major historical trends and their impact on culture, including the slave trade, colonialism, and postcolonial international contacts. Content is drawn from literature (both written literature and oral traditions), film, history, religion, anthropology, sociology, and art. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 285: Intro.Interdisciplinary Topics

An introduction to interdisciplinary analysis through topics that are best understood through multiple methodologies and forms of evidence. The ILA and IDS program support interdisciplinary inquiry across Emory College; this course will frequently be cross-listed with other departments. Credit Hours: 1-4.

IDS 285W: Intro.Interdisciplinary Topics

An introduction to interdisciplinary analysis through topics that are best understood through multiple methodologies and forms of evidence. The ILA and IDS program support interdisciplinary inquiry across Emory College; this course will frequently be cross-listed with other departments. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

IDS 290: Interdisciplinary Sidecar

A side-car course brings together a subset of students from two courses that overlap in methodologies, topics, etc., to create a short interdisciplinary course that runs simultaneously with its two sponsoring courses. One credit, S/U only. Schedule and format arranged by sponsoring professors. Credit Hours: 1.

IDS 315: Nazi Medicine and Biology

This course examines medicine in Germany from 1933 to 1945 and the extreme examples of the excesses of modern medical culture it provides. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 315W: Nazi Medicine and Biology

This course examines medicine in Germany from 1933 to 1945 and the extreme examples of the excesses of modern medical culture it provides. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

IDS 350: Freud & Dreams

A seminar centered on detailed study of Freud's major writings on dreams, with goals of illuminating Freud's theory of the mind and understanding the nature of dreams, including our own. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 385: Special Topics

Highly focused courses, drawing on multiple disciplines of the humanities and social sciences; may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Credit Hours: 1-4.

IDS 385W: Special Topics

Highly focused courses, drawing on multiple disciplines of the humanities and social sciences; may be repeated for credit when topics vary. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

IDS 390: Interdiscpl. Research Design

Required of AMST and IDS majors spring semester of junior year, this course focuses intensively on the design and initiation of the senior research process. Students' projects are honed, refined, workshopped--bibliography, outline, budget, etc. Students are readied for required senior year research. Credit Hours: 4.

IDS 391: Sustainability CapstoneSeminar

A seminar for Sustainability Minors in which capstone research projects and professional development portfolios are completed. Shared readings and project presentations will support broad integration of the economic, environmental, and social dimensions of the minor. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 392: Capstone Development Studies

This course culminates the minor in Development Studies, with common readings and class meetings and a final presentation of completed projects to the Faculty Capstone Committee. The steering committee will approve service learning opportunities, internships, and research projects. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 420R: ORDER Senior Seminar

On Recent Discoveries by Emory Researchers (ORDER) engages graduate and postdoctoral students to teach their research to undergraduates. Recommended for seniors. Refer to Course Atlas for specific topics of a given semester, articulated by the teacher-scholar team. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 420RW: ORDER Senior Seminar

On Recent Discoveries by Emory Researchers (ORDER) engages graduate and postdoctoral students to teach their research to undergraduates. Recommended for seniors. Refer to Course Atlas for specific topics of a given semester, articulated by the teacher-scholar team. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

IDS 485R: Internship for IDS

Prerequisite: prior approval of director of undergraduate studies for IDS. Credit Hours: 1-6.

IDS 489: Advanced Special Topics

Examination of interdisciplinary issues at an advanced level; typically appropriate for seniors. This course number is used for piloting new courses or cross-listing. Credit Hours: 1-4.

IDS 489W: Advanced Special Topics

Examination of interdisciplinary issues at an advanced level; typically appropriate for seniors. This course number is used for piloting new courses or cross-listing. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-5.

IDS 490R: Supervised Reading and Study

Prerequisite: consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies for IDS. Credit Hours: 1-4.

IDS 491: Senior Seminar

IDS 491 senior seminar serves as the capstone experience for all each class of interdisciplinary undergraduate scholars. Students write and present a portion of their senior project, read contemporary debates about interdisciplinarity, and design a shared unit of interdisciplinary study. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 491W: Senior Seminar

IDS 491 senior seminar serves as the capstone experience for all each class of interdisciplinary undergraduate scholars. Students write and present a portion of their senior project, read contemporary debates about interdisciplinarity, and design a shared unit of interdisciplinary study. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

IDS 492R: Senior Research

Prerequisite: consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies for IDS. Credit Hours: 1-12.

IDS 495R: Honors

Independent research and writing for students in the Honors Program. Credit Hours: 3.

IDS 495RW: Honors

Independent research and writing for students in the Honors Program. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 1-8.

IDS 499R: Senior Research

Independent research and writing on topic associated with concentrations of majors. Limited to majors. Credit Hours: 1-4.

IDS 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-Equivalent Transfer Course in Interdisciplinary Studies. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Emory College Internship

INTERN 496R: Experiential Links to Major

Students have an opportunity to integrate knowledge derived from their academic studies with experiences gained from real-world work settings. A pre-internship workshop and post-internship reflection assignment help students think critically about the connections between their major and career goals. Credit Hours: 1.

INTERN 497R: Advanced Practicum for Major

The Advanced Practicum provides an opportunity to further explore career interests while applying knowledge and skills learned in the classroom to a professional setting. Pre-and post-internship assignments help students think intentionally about their internship, goals, professional development. Credit Hours: 1. Requisites: INTERN 496R as prerequisite.

Italian

ITAL 101: Language & Culture, Elem I

This introductory course is for students who have no prior study of the Italian language. ITAL101 is designed to help students build basic communication skills in Italian. We emphasize all four language skills:speaking, listening, reading, and writing as well as cross-cultural competency. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

ITAL 102: Language & Culture, Elem. II

This course focuses on elementary communication skills through a systematic introduction to the basic grammatical patterns and vocabulary of the Italian language. The goal is to widen the fundamental skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing within a cultural context. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

ITAL 110: Intensive Elementary Italian

Innovative eBook Italian Virtual Class: engaging approach to language learning, full immersion in Italian culture, literature and art with authentic materials; development of analytical, critical skills, cross-cultural competency and higher than norm linguistic fluency. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 8.

ITAL 170: Intro to Italian Studies I

Interdisciplinary survey I: antiquity to Humanism. Investigating a variety of Italian culture topics course examines intersections of Liberal Arts perspectives to enhance global understanding of others and self, critical reasoning skills and cross-cultural awareness fostered. In English, no pre-req. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 170W: Intro to alian Studies I

Interdisciplinary survey I: antiquity to Humanism. Investigating a variety of Italian culture topics course examines intersections of Liberal Arts perspectives to enhance global understanding of others and self, critical reasoning skills and cross-cultural awareness fostered. In English, no pre-req. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ITAL 171: Intro to Italian Studies II

Interdisciplinary survey II: Humanism to 21st century. Investigating variety of Italian culture topics course examines intersections of Liberal Arts perspectives to enhance global understanding of others and self, critical reasoning skills. cross-cultural awareness fostered. In English, no pre-req. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 171W: Intro to Italian Studies II

Interdisciplinary survey II: Humanism to 21st century. Investigating variety of Italian culture topics course examines intersections of Liberal Arts perspectives to enhance global understanding of others and self, critical reasoning skills. cross-cultural awareness fostered. In English, no pre-req. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

ITAL 190: Freshmen Seminar: Italian

Seminar designed to engage freshmen in aspects of inquiry and research into areas of Italian culture through mutual exploration of subject matter. Primary mode of classroom discourse is dialogue and group projects. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 201: Language & Culture, Inter. I

This course is a continuation of Elementary Italian sequence.This intermediate-level Italian language course provides students with new perspectives on Italian culture while building writing, reading, speaking and listening skills in a cultural context. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

ITAL 202: Language & Culture, Inter. II

Utilizing authentic texts, this engaging content-based approach to language learning focuses on a historically sequenced in-depth study of Italian art, history, and literature, developing analytical-critical skills, cross-cultural competency and higher than norm linguistic fluency. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

ITAL 205: Practical Conversation

Development of cultural-linguistic fluency in the spoken language through discussions of contemporary issues in Italian culture. Emphasis on increasing vocabulary and ease in the manipulation of grammatical structure. Also used to designate language classes taken on semester programs in Italy. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3-8.

ITAL 210: Italian for Read Comprehension

Designed for students, preferably with some knowledge of other Romance languages, who wish to develop necessary skills in reading Italian for research purposes. Other skills practiced. No prior knowledge of Italian required. Recommended for graduate students or research faculty working in Italy. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 270R: Italy: Cultr and Civilization

Taught in English, this course is recommended for students interested in an in-depth immersion into Italian history and culture. Beginning in Rome with the rise and fall of the Roman Empire, we then travel to different regions every year examining over 3000 years of human achievement. Italy is explored from a cultural, historical, artistic, and archaeological perspective with Emory faculty from across the disciplines and benefiting by local experts. Through investigation of a wide variety of topics and themes in Italian culture, the goal of the course is to teach students to examine how an intersection of Liberal Arts perspectives enhances a more global understanding of others and of self. Together with cross-cultural awareness students sharpen critical analysis and reasoning skills. No knowledge of Italian required, with new content course may be repeated. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 4.

ITAL 290: Supervised Reading

Intermediate supervised study in the reading of literary texts or other aspects of Italian culture. Course may be repeated with a new research focus. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ITAL 300: Survey of Italian Literature

Chronological survey of Italian literature from 13th through 21st centuries that introduces students to representative Italian authors and their significant writings contextualized within genre and literary-historical-cultural background. In Italian. Prereq: Instructor???s approval or Ital 302. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 301: Language & Culture, Adv. I

Utilizing authentic texts, this engaging content-based approach to language learning focuses on a historically sequenced in-depth study of Italian art, history, and literature, developing analytical-critical skills, cross-cultural competency and higher than norm linguistic fluency. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 301W: Language & Culture, Adv. I

Utilizing authentic texts, this engaging content-based approach to language learning focuses on a historically sequenced in-depth study of Italian art, history, and literature, developing analytical-critical skills, cross-cultural competency and higher than norm linguistic fluency. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

ITAL 302: Language & Culture; Adv. II

Utilizing authentic texts, this engaging content-based approach to language learning focuses on a historically sequenced in-depth study of Italian art, history, and literature, developing analytical-critical skills, cross-cultural competency and higher than norm linguistic fluency. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 302W: Language & Culture; Adv. II

Utilizing authentic texts, this engaging content-based approach to language learning focuses on a historically sequenced in-depth study of Italian art, history, and literature, developing analytical-critical skills, cross-cultural competency and higher than norm linguistic fluency. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

ITAL 315: Romance Languages (In English)

This course compares and contrasts the Romance languages by investigating the sociocultural and linguistic aspects of their evolution from Latin. No previous study of linguistics required. Two semesters of Romance languages recommended. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 317: Vergil and Dante

Reading of Vergil's Aeneid and Dante's Divine Comedy in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 317W: Vergil and Dante

Reading of Vergil's Aeneid and Dante's Divine Comedy in English translation. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ITAL 340R: Italian Cinema:Liter Adaptatn

A survey of Italian cinema, with emphasis on its relationship to literature. Examines how a text is put into film and how cultural references operate with respect to issues of style, technique, and perspective. Course may be repeated with a new syllabus. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 350: The Rise of Humanism

Introduction to the historical period, major works, innovations, and lasting influence of the three most significant authors of Italian literature during the Middle Ages: Dante, Petrarca, and Boccaccio. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 350W: The Rise of Humanism

Introduction to the historical period, major works, innovations, and lasting influence of the three most significant authors of Italian literature during the Middle Ages: Dante, Petrarca, and Boccaccio. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ITAL 360: Iss In The Italian Renaissance

General introduction to some of the major issues and trends of this cultural era as well as the contributions and principal works of the writers involved in the development and crisis of Renaissance culture in Italy. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 360W: Iss in the Italian Renaissance

General introduction to some of the major issues and trends of this cultural era as well as the contributions and principal works of the writers involved in the development and crisis of Renaissance culture in Italy. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ITAL 370: Noodle Narratives/Silk Road

There are unmistakable similarities between Italian and Chinese cultures regarding the noodle. In fact, the noodle evokes family traditions, rituals, symbolism, and emotional connection in both cultures. Our class explores how identity, assimilation and cultural integration are manifested in food. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 370W: Noodle Narratives/Silk Road

There are unmistakable similarities between Italian and Chinese cultures regarding the noodle. In fact, the noodle evokes family traditions, rituals, symbolism, and emotional connection in both cultures. Our class explores how identity, assimilation and cultural integration are manifested in food. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 4.

ITAL 372: Top.in Italian Culture in Ital

Summer. Offered through Emory Summer Abroad Program in Bologna. Cultural topics to be announced each summer. Course taught in Italian. May be repeated for credit when syllabus changes. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3. Requisites: ITAL 102 as prerequisite.

ITAL 372W: Top.in Italian Culture in Ital

Summer. Offered through Emory Summer Abroad Program in Bologna. Cultural topics to be announced each summer. Course taught in Italian. May be repeated for credit when syllabus changes. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4. Requisites: ITAL 102 as prerequisite.

ITAL 375: Tops in Ital Lit in Trans

Topics to be announced each semester. Course taught in English. May be repeated for credit when syllabus changes. Focus on developing critical analysis and reasoning skills. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ITAL 375W: Tops in Ital Lit in Trans

Topics to be announced each semester. Course taught in English. May be repeated for credit when syllabus changes. Focus on developing critical analysis and reasoning skills. General Education Requirement: HAPW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ITAL 376: Top in Italian Cultr in Trans

Topics to be announced each semester. Course is offered in English. Course content will vary, including topics of literature, history, culture, art history, political thought, current trends, and more. May be repeated for credit when syllabus changes. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ITAL 376W: Top in Italian Cultr in Trans

Topics to be announced each semester. Course is offered in English. Course content will vary, including topics of literature, history, culture, art history, political thought, current trends, and more. May be repeated for credit when syllabus changes. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ITAL 397R: Supervised Reading

Credit is variable. Advanced supervised study in the reading of literary texts or other aspects of Italian culture. Course may be repeated with a new research focus. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 1-12.

ITAL 470: Topics in Italian Literature

In Italian. Intensive study of a single author, genre, literary movement, or period. Topic to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Italian 302 or permission of program director. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 1-4.

ITAL 470W: Topics in Italian Literature

In Italian. Intensive study of a single author, genre, literary movement, or period. Topic to be announced in advance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Italian 302 or permission of program director. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 1-5.

ITAL 495A: Honors

Course engages in critical methods in analysis and interpretation of literature and cultural studies, bibliographic materials and methods of independent research. Course culminates in an honors thesis, written in Italian, demonstrating the application of principles learned. Course carefully follows the College guidelines for writing requirement. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

ITAL 495BW: Honors

Critical methods in analysis and interpretation of literature and cultural studies, bibliographic materials and methods of independent research; honors thesis demonstrating the application of principles learned. Course carefully follows the College guidelines for writing requirement. General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 1-8.

ITAL 497R: Individual Directed Study

Independent research for students majoring in Italian Studies. Advanced directed studies in Italian literature and culture. Course may be repeated for a different project. Credit Hours: 1-16.

ITAL 999XFR: Non-Equivalent Transfer Course

Non-Equivalent Transfer Course in Italian. Credit Hours: 1-99.

Japanese

JPN 101: Elementary Japanese I

This course is designed to introduce students to the everyday language of Japan. Lessons will be organized around natural conversational topics, leading students from fundamental aspects of grammar to readings in simple texts. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

JPN 102: Elementary Japanese II

Continuation of Japanese 101. Students will learn vocabulary, expressions, and sentence structures to become able to meet basic communication needs in Japanese. All four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) will be incorporated, and accurate and appropriate language use will be emphasized. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 5.

JPN 114: Element Studi Abroad

This course is exclusively for students studying elementary Japanese through Emory-affiliated summer abroad intensive language programs. It is equivalent to JPN 101. Credit Hours: 4.

JPN 115: Sty.Abroad:Elementary Japanese

This course is exclusively for students studying elementary Japanese through Emory-affiliated summer abroad intensive language programs. It is equivalent to JPN 102. Credit Hours: 4.

JPN 190: Fresh Sem: Japanese

Focus on special aspects of Japanese culture or language. General Education Requirement: FSEM. Credit Hours: 3.

JPN 201: Intermediate Japanese I

Continuation of Japanese 102. This course aims to further develop language skills and increase familiarity with Japanese society. The emphasis is on accurate communication in Japanese, both spoken and written, that is appropriate to the given context. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

JPN 202: Intermediate Japanese II

Continuation of Japanese 201. This course is designed to complete the introduction and practice of basic grammar of Japanese. More authentic language material will be introduced. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 4.

JPN 214: Supervised Reading Abroad

This course is exclusively for students studying intermediate Japanese through Emory-affiliated summer abroad intensive language programs. It is equivalent to JPN 201. Credit Hours: 4.

JPN 215: Intermed Studi Abroad

This course is exclusively for students studying intermediate Japanese through Emory-affiliated summer abroad intensive language programs. It is equivalent to JPN 202. Credit Hours: 4.

JPN 232: Lang Usage in Japanese Society

Prerequisite: Japanese 201 or consent of instructor. Provides an in-depth knowledge of the Japanese language in relation to culture and society, focusing on Japanese modes of thinking that lie behind language usage. Taught in English. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

JPN 234: Intro to Japanese Linguistics

This course examines aspects of Japanese language from a linguistic perspective. It will introduce basic concepts in linguistics such as phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, using examples from Japanese language. It aims to provide opportunities to deepen the understanding of the Japanese language as well as to deepen the understanding of world languages by examining Japanese. This course should be of interest to students who are learning Japanese and are interested in the structural aspect of the language and to those who are interested in broadening their knowledge of different languages. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

JPN 250: Intro to East Asian Studies

Required for East Asian Studies Majors and Minors. An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to major topics and methodologies in East Asian Studies, with an emphasis on writing, research, and critical thinking. Themes include history, literature, religion, and the arts. Credit Hours: 3.

JPN 250W: Intro to East Asian Studies

Required for East Asian Studies Majors and Minors. An interdisciplinary course that introduces students to major topics and methodologies in East Asian Studies, with an emphasis on writing, research, and critical thinking. Themes include history, literature, religion, and the arts. General Education Requirement: WRT. Credit Hours: 4.

JPN 270: Intro to Japanese Culture

This course explores various aspects of life and society in Japan, including writing, gender, memory and history, geography and the environment, aesthetics, and the formation of national identity. General Education Requirement: HSC. Credit Hours: 3.

JPN 270W: Intro to Japanese Culture

This course explores various aspects of life and society in Japan, including writing, gender, memory and history, geography and the environment, aesthetics, and the formation of national identity. General Education Requirement: HSCW. Credit Hours: 4.

JPN 275: Nature and Culture in Japan

We examine the interaction between the human and natural world in Japanese cultural and scientific history by looking at maps, literature, scriptures, visual media, and current journalism. General Education Requirement: HAP. Credit Hours: 3.

JPN 301: Adv Conversation & Composition

Prerequisite: Japanese 202 or consent of instructor. This course is designed to develop fluency in spoken Japanese as well as enhance writing skills. Cross-cultural awareness will be emphasized and close attention will be paid to developing sophisticated expressions and nuances in the language. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

JPN 302: Adv Conv & Composition II

Prerequisite: Japanese 301 or consent of instructor. This course provides opportunities for reading and discussion of authentic materials, as well as for learning how to write with systematic instruction on composition. Students will write essays on topics such as jibun-shi (autobiography). General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

JPN 302W: Adv Conv & Composition II

Prerequisite: Japanese 301 or consent of instructor. This course provides opportunities for reading and discussion of authentic materials, as well as for learning how to write with systematic instruction on composition. Students will write essays on topics such as jibun-shi (autobiography). General Education Requirement: HALW. Credit Hours: 4.

JPN 303: Reading Literature in Japanese

This class helps students develop the skills necessary to read Japanese-language texts without the aid of an instructor. Assignments emphasize vocabulary building and kanji recognition, strategies for decoding complex sentence structures, and the nuances of language and literary style. General Education Requirement: HAL. Credit Hours: 3.

JPN 314R: Study Abroad - Language

This course is exclusively for students studying advanced Japanese through Emory-affiliated summer abroad intensive language programs. It is equivalent to JPN 301. Credit Hours: 4.

JPN 315R: Study Abroad - Non Language

This course designates any study abroad non-language course that does not have an Emory equivalent. Repeatable. Credit Hours: 4.

JPN 316R: Soc.Su/Sci/ Tech Study Abroad

Social Science, Science, Technology Study Abroad in Japan. Credit Hours: 4.

JPN 360: Japanese Modern Women Writers

This course familiarizes students with the multiplicity of the female