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Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program

The Program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies promotes a multidisciplinary understanding of culture, history, and contemporary issues in the region. Students take courses that examine the region from a wide array of disciplinary perspectives, while simultaneously deepening their knowledge of Latin America and the Caribbean within a disciplinary concentration. A student who completes this program receives a degree in Latin American and Caribbean Studies with a concentration in a single discipline. Students are encouraged to pursue part of their education studying abroad in Latin America or the Caribbean. A maximum of sixteen credit hours of foreign study can be applied towards the major, with the approval of the program's Director of Undergraduate Studies. In addition to its course offerings, the Program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies regularly sponsors lectures, seminars, exhibitions, and films. It also hosts visiting scholars and encourages student internships.

Faculty

Chair/Director
Robert Goddard
P4593957
Lecturer

Education

  • BA, Oberlin College, 1984
  • PhD, Emory University, 2005

Departments

  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty
  • Spanish and Portuguese, Core Faculty

Academic Interest

  • Caribbean nationalism (specifically the links between creole ideologies and sugar capitalism)
Director of Undergraduate Studies
Robert Goddard
P4593957
Lecturer

Education

  • BA, Oberlin College, 1984
  • PhD, Emory University, 2005

Departments

  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty
  • Spanish and Portuguese, Core Faculty

Academic Interest

  • Caribbean nationalism (specifically the links between creole ideologies and sugar capitalism)
Core Faculty
Peggy Barlett
P6100059
Goodrich C White Professor

Education

  • BA, Grinnell College, 1969
  • PhD, Columbia University, 1975

Departments

  • Anthropology, Core Faculty
  • American Studies, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interests

  • economic anthropology
  • agricultural systems
  • gender
  • sustainable development
  • Latin America
  • United States
C Monica Capra
P1805634
Associate Professor

Education

  • Other, Pearson College, 1989
  • BA, Franklin and Marshall College, 1992
  • PhD, University of Virginia, 1999

Departments

  • Economics, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty
  • Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology, Associated Faculty

Academic Interests

  • experimental economics
  • development
Maria Carrion
P5127079
Professor

Education

  • BA, University of Puerto Rico, 1981
  • MS, University of Puerto Rico, 1983
  • MA, University of Tennessee, 1985
  • MPhil, Yale University, 1987
  • PhD, Yale University, 1990

Departments

  • Spanish and Portuguese, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty
  • Medieval Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interests

  • Renaissance and Baroque Spanish literature
  • gender studies
Hernan Feldman
P3553394
Associate Professor

Education

  • BA, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1997
  • MA, Indiana University, 2001
  • PhD, Indiana University, 2005

Departments

  • Spanish and Portuguese, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interests

  • nineteenth- and twentieth-century Southern Cone literature
  • cultural studies
  • visual culture
  • music
Carla Freeman
P8764315
Associate Professor

Education

  • AB, Bryn Mawr College, 1983
  • PhD, Temple University, 1993

Departments

  • Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interests

  • gender
  • feminist anthropology
  • modernity and development
  • transnational culture and economy
  • labor and consumption
  • Caribbean
  • anthropology and women's studies
Robert Goddard
P4593957
Lecturer

Education

  • BA, Oberlin College, 1984
  • PhD, Emory University, 2005

Departments

  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty
  • Spanish and Portuguese, Core Faculty

Academic Interest

  • Caribbean nationalism (specifically the links between creole ideologies and sugar capitalism)
Ricardo Gutierrez-Mouat
P3139523
Professor

Education

  • PhD, Princeton University, 1978

Departments

  • Spanish and Portuguese, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty
Vialla Hartfield-Mendez
P7329677
Professor of Pedagogy

Education

  • BA, University of Southern Mississippi, 1983
  • MA, University of Virginia, 1986
  • PhD, University of Virginia, 1989

Departments

  • Spanish and Portuguese, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interests

  • contemporary Spanish and Latin American literature and culture
  • Hispanic culture of the United States
  • literacy and community outreach programs
Jeffrey Lesser
P7378942
Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor

Education

  • BA, Brown University, 1982
  • MA, Brown University, 1984
  • PhD, New York University, 1989

Departments

  • Jewish Studies, Core Faculty
  • History, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interests

  • modern Latin American history
  • ethnicity
  • immigration
  • race (especially in Brazil)
Valerie Loichot
P5258365
Associate Professor

Education

  • BA, Universite de Franche- Comte, 1989
  • MA, Universite de Franche- Comte, 1990
  • PhD, Louisiana State University, 1996

Departments

  • French and Italian Studies, Core Faculty
  • American Studies, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interest

  • Francophone and postcolonial literature, culture, and theory
David Nugent
P6658716
Professor

Education

  • BA, Michigan State University, 1977
  • MA, Columbia University, 1980
  • MPhil, Columbia University, 1982
  • PhD, Columbia University, 1988

Departments

  • Anthropology, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interests

  • political and economic anthropology
  • symbolism and power
  • race and inequality
  • Latin America
  • indigenous North America
Mary Odem
P7099561
Professor

Education

  • BA, Washington University, 1980
  • MA, University of California, Berkeley, 1984
  • PhD, University of California, Berkeley, 1989

Departments

  • History, Core Faculty
  • American Studies, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interests

  • history of women, gender, and family in the United States
  • history of immigration and ethnicity
Jose Quiroga
P6550405
Professor

Education

  • BA, Boston University, 1980
  • MPhil, Yale University, 1987
  • PhD, Yale University, 1989

Departments

  • Spanish and Portuguese, Core Faculty
  • Comparative Literature, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interests

  • contemporary Latin American
  • Latino and Caribbean studies
  • contemporary poetry
  • gender
Dierdra Reber
P4769596
Assistant Professor

Education

  • BA, Columbia University, 1996
  • PhD, University of Pennsylvania, 2005

Departments

  • Spanish and Portuguese, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interests

  • twentieth- and twenty-first century Latin American literature and film
  • literary and cultural theory
Jeffrey Staton
P4745880
Winship Distinguished Associate Professor

Education

  • BA, University of Richmond, 1996
  • MA, Washington University, 1999
  • PhD, Washington University, 2002

Departments

  • Political Science, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interests

  • comparative judicial politcs
  • institutional theory
  • politics of law
  • courts in the United States and other countries (Mexico in particular)
  • areas such as human rights protection, citizenship and nationality, and the politics of dictatorship
Karen Stolley
P7794681
Associate Professor

Education

  • BA, Middlebury College, 1977
  • MA, Yale University, 1980
  • PhD, Yale University, 1985

Departments

  • Spanish and Portuguese, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interests

  • colonial Latin American literature
  • eighteenth-century studies
Rebecca Stone
P2118382
Massee-Martin/NEH Distinguished Teaching Professor

Education

  • BA, University of Michigan, 1979
  • MA, Yale University, 1982
  • PhD, Yale University, 1987

Departments

  • Art History, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interest

  • ancient American art
Kristin Wendland
P9927561
Senior Lecturer

Education

  • BM, Florida State University, 1978
  • MM, College- Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati, 1982
  • PhD, City University of New York, 1991

Departments

  • Music, Core Faculty
  • Latin American and Caribbean Studies, Core Faculty

Academic Interest

  • theory

Courses

Latin American and Caribbean Studies 100-Level Courses
LACS 101: Intro To Lat American Studies
General Information
Credit Hours
3
GERs
HSC
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

An interdisciplinary introduction to Latin America and the Caribbean and to the LACS Program at Emory. The course provides historical background and familiarizes students with contemporary political, social, economic, and cultural issues.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Lecture
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Scheduled Related Component
Film Screening with discussion
Weekly Contact Minutes in Related Component
50 - 90
LACS 190: Fr Sem:Lat Amer & Caribbn Stds
General Information
Credit Hours
3
GERs
FSEM
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

Introduces first-year students to Latin America and/or the Caribbean, and to different disciplinary approaches. Topics and regions covered vary.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Seminar
Weekly Contact Minutes
150
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
Latin American and Caribbean Studies 200-Level Courses
LACS 263: Plantation to Postcolonial
General Information
Credit Hours
3
GERs
HSC
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

¿Plantation America¿, stretching from the American South, through the Caribbean to northern Brazil, comprises a geographical area that, as its name suggests, was dominated by the economic system of plantation monoculture. This course will attempt two inter-related tasks: it will firstly survey the unity and variety of the plantation as a form of socio-economic organization; secondly it will explicate the unity and variety of the political and cultural forms that have evolved alongside the plantation. The course will be interdisciplinary in nature, using texts from history, literature and anthropology.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Lecture
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
LACS 263W: Plantation to Postcolonial
General Information
Credit Hours
4
GERs
HSCW
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

¿Plantation America¿, stretching from the American South, through the Caribbean to northern Brazil, comprises a geographical area that, as its name suggests, was dominated by the economic system of plantation monoculture. This course will attempt two inter-related tasks: it will firstly survey the unity and variety of the plantation as a form of socio-economic organization; secondly it will explicate the unity and variety of the political and cultural forms that have evolved alongside the plantation. The course will be interdisciplinary in nature, using texts from history, literature and anthropology.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Lecture
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
Writing Requirement
Yes
LACS 265: Visitor Meets Native
General Information
Credit Hours
3
GERs
HSC
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

The Caribbean is the most intensively exploited tourism destination in the world, and yet the significance of the industry to the area is less well understood than comparable experiences such as plantation agriculture, slavery and colonialism. This course will bring together existing research to examine tourism as at one time an economic enterprise and also as a deeply significant cultural experience that has played an under-recognized part in shaping the cultural mores and lifestyles of both the island destinations and the home countries. The course will address such complex and controversial questions as how much does tourism contribute to economic development, especially when sustainability issues are considered; what are the links between tourism and crime, especially drugs and prostitution; and how real are the supposed threats of tourism to national identity. The course will be interdisciplinary in nature, with sources from anthropology, history, literature and popular culture, and will also include selections from music and film.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Lecture
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
LACS 265W: Visitor Meets Native
General Information
Credit Hours
4
GERs
HSCW
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

The Caribbean is the most intensively exploited tourism destination in the world, and yet the significance of the industry to the area is less well understood than comparable experiences such as plantation agriculture, slavery and colonialism. This course will bring together existing research to examine tourism as at one time an economic enterprise and also as a deeply significant cultural experience that has played an under-recognized part in shaping the cultural mores and lifestyles of both the island destinations and the home countries. The course will address such complex and controversial questions as how much does tourism contribute to economic development, especially when sustainability issues are considered; what are the links between tourism and crime, especially drugs and prostitution; and how real are the supposed threats of tourism to national identity. The course will be interdisciplinary in nature, with sources from anthropology, history, literature and popular culture, and will also include selections from music and film.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Lecture
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
Writing Requirement
Yes
LACS 270: Topics: Latin Americn Issues
General Information
Credit Hours
3
GERs
HSC
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

Topics vary.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Lecture
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
LACS 270W: Topics: Latin Americn Issues
General Information
Credit Hours
4
GERs
HSCW
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

Topics vary.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Lecture
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
Writing Requirement
Yes
Latin American and Caribbean Studies 300-Level Courses
LACS 362: History of the Caribbean
General Information
Credit Hours
3
GERs
HSC
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
HIST 362: History Of The Caribbean
Course Description

Development of the major islands of Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico, from colonial times to the present. Emphasizes evolution of plantation societies, slavery and race relations, international rivalries, economic dependence, political independence, and social revolutions.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Lecture
Weekly Contact Minutes
150
LACS 362W: History of the Caribbean
General Information
Credit Hours
4
GERs
HSCW
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
HIST 362W: History Of The Caribbean
Course Description

Development of the major islands of Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico, from colonial times to the present. Emphasizes evolution of plantation societies, slavery and race relations, international rivalries, economic dependence, political independence, and social revolutions.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Lecture
Weekly Contact Minutes
150
Writing Requirement
Yes
LACS 363: Sugar and Rum
General Information
Credit Hours
3
GERs
HSC
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

Sugar and rum were for centuries the quintessential Caribbean products, commodities which created fortunes for planters and merchants, while changing the lifestyles of the European working classes. This class will examine not only the development of sugar and rum production and its effect on the Caribbean¿s socio-economic organization in the form of the plantation, but also how these commodities have come to define social status in the metropolis through changing patterns of consumption. Students will use materials from a variety of genres and disciplines, from social history to advertising, and from anthropology to popular music and film.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Lecture
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
LACS 363W: Sugar and Rum
General Information
Credit Hours
4
GERs
HSCW
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

Sugar and rum were for centuries the quintessential Caribbean products, commodities which created fortunes for planters and merchants, while changing the lifestyles of the European working classes. This class will examine not only the development of sugar and rum production and its effect on the Caribbean¿s socio-economic organization in the form of the plantation, but also how these commodities have come to define social status in the metropolis through changing patterns of consumption. Students will use materials from a variety of genres and disciplines, from social history to advertising, and from anthropology to popular music and film.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Lecture
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
Writing Requirement
Yes
LACS 385: Sp Top:Lat Amer & Caribbn Stds
General Information
Credit Hours
3
GERs
None
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

Topics vary.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Lecture
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
LACS 385W: Sp Top:Lat Amer & Caribbn Stds
General Information
Credit Hours
4
GERs
None
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

Topics vary.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Lecture
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
Writing Requirement
Yes
Latin American and Caribbean Studies 400-Level Courses
LACS 490R: Adv Sem:Lat Amer & Caribbn Std
General Information
Credit Hours
3
GERs
HSC
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

Topics vary. Each colloquium treats a different theme in depth, often combining reading and seminar discussion with research and writing. If listed as WR, fulfills the post-freshman writing requirement.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Seminar
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
LACS 490RW: Adv Sem:Lat Amer & Caribbn Std
General Information
Credit Hours
4
GERs
HSCW
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

Topics vary. Each colloquium treats a different theme in depth, often combining reading and seminar discussion with research and writing. If listed as WR, fulfills the post-freshman writing requirement.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Seminar
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
Writing Requirement
Yes
LACS 495A: Honors Thesis I
General Information
Credit Hours
4
GERs
HSC
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

Fall, Spring. For LAS honors students only. Credit for undertaking supervised research and writing of the honors thesis, over the course of two semesters.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Independent Honors research
Weekly Contact Minutes
200
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
LACS 495BW: Honors Thesis II
General Information
Credit Hours
1 - 8
GERs
WRT
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

Fall, Spring. For LAS honors students only. Credit for undertaking supervised research and writing of the honors thesis, over the course of two semesters.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Independent Honors research
Weekly Contact Minutes
variable
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
Writing Requirement
Yes
LACS 497R: Independent Study
General Information
Credit Hours
1 - 8
GERs
None
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

Variable credit. Prerequisite: prior approval of instructor or LAS director of undergraduate studies. Supervised study of the region for students pursuing directed reading under the guidance of a faculty member. Credit may also be granted for courses taken abroad and/or for internships, with prior approval of the LACS Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students who wish to receive credit for academic projects conducted outside of a degree-granting institution, including internships and independent research undertaken abroad, must arrange for an Emory faculty member to serve as project director. In addition, students will produce a scholarly paper to be reviewed and approved by the project director and LACS director of undergraduate studies.

Contact Hour Information
Course Type
Undergraduate research
Weekly Contact Minutes
variable
Additional Course Plus Component
Not Applicable
Additional LACS Core Courses
SPAN 300: Read In Spanish:Text & Context
General Information
Credit Hours
4
GERs
HALW
Variable GER
None
Pre-Requisites
None
Co-Requisites
None
Cross-Listed
None
Course Description

Every semester. The foundation course for the major and minor. A course in Hispanic cultural literacy that also strengthens written and oral language skills.

Contact Hour Information

Honors Program

See “Honors Program” under the curriculum section of the catalog and consult the department for further details.

For more information, see Honors Program | Academic Policies & Regulations.