Major Code: AAS
BA degree awarded
38 - 44 hours to complete
11 courses required
For the Declaration of Major Form, contact the department:

Requirements

Eleven courses (thirty-eight to forty-four semester hours) are required for the major in African American studies, which includes four to eight semester hours in an internship during the spring semester of the major’s senior year. Emphasizing the rich traditions of African Americans in the humanities and the social sciences, the major is divided into the following interrelated sectors:


Prerequisites: AAS 100, Introduction to African American Studies, is a required course for African American studies majors and minors and should be taken prior to enrolling in other AAS courses.

(1) Introduction to the field (AAS 100): introduces the major disciplines and topics that make up African American studies and provides orientation to faculty, institutional, and community resources, and a foundation for subsequent course work and a research project in the field. AAS 100 is a required course for African American studies majors and minors and should be taken prior to enrolling in other AAS courses.

(2) Areas of study: Africa and the diaspora (two courses required, with one focusing upon continental Africa); expressive arts and culture (three courses required); and identities, ideologies, and institutions (three courses required).

(3) Senior seminar (African American Studies 490): multidisciplinary in nature, the readings of the senior seminar reflect the centrality of the historical and cultural contributions of African Americans to American history and culture.

(4) Internship (African American Studies 496): the internship program encourages majors to become participants rather than simply recipients of the educational process. Majors are assigned to an internship in the fall, and they are enrolled in an internship the spring of their senior year. Majors may earn a maximum of eight credit hours during the period of the internship. Opportunities for internships exist with a number of public and private institutions whose focus is upon African American life and history. These institutions include The Atlanta Project of The Carter Center and the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change. Permission of the director is required.

(5) Contributing courses (one elective): This organizational scheme is designed to provide students with both structure and flexibility, as well as a coherent conceptual framework within which to study African American– and Africandiaspora history and culture.