Major Code: ECON
BA degree awarded
36 hours to complete
12 courses required
For the Declaration of Major Form, contact the department:

Requirements

A.    Mathematics 111 and Mathematics 112 (or equivalents)

B.    Economics 101, 112, 201, 212, 220 and 420

C.    Completion of four elective economics courses, of which at least eight hours must be at the 400 level and no more than four hours at the 200 level (215 or 231).

Areas of Concentration

Students are encouraged, although not required, to choose their economic electives (Requirement D) to fit one of the nine areas of concentration. Upon request, the Department of Economics will issue a certificate to any student completing an area of concentration. The nine areas are:

Law and Economics. Four courses to include:

  • Law and Economics (Econ 442)

  • TWO of the following: Industrial Organization (Econ 405), Public Finance (Econ 434), Economics of Regulation (Econ 440), or Public Choice (Econ 443)

  • ONE of the following: Business and Government (Econ 341),Health Economics (Econ 371), Health Policy & Economics (Econ 372)

International Economics. Four courses to include:

  • Introduction to Global Trade & Finance (Econ 231)

  • International Trade (Econ 431)

  • International Finance (Econ 432)

  • Four-hour economics course at or above the 300-level

Business Policy. Four courses to include:

  • ONE of the following: Econometrics (Econ 420) or Economic Forecasting (Econ 422)

  • ONE of the following: Stocks, Bonds, and Financial Markets (Econ 215), Business and Government (Econ 341), or Development of the Modern U.S. Economy (Econ 356)

  • ONE of the following: Managerial Economics (Econ 400), Industrial Organization (Econ 405), Economics of Labor Markets (Econ 430), or Housing and Mortgage Markets (Econ 446)

  • Four-hour economics course at or above the 200-level

Public Policy. Four courses to include:

  • EITHER two of the following: Contemporary Economic Issues (Econ 309), Business and Government (Econ 341), Environmental Economics & Policy (Econ 365) or Health Policy & Economics (Econ 372) OR eight hours of Washington Policy Semester (Econ 394)

  • TWO of the following: Industrial Organization (Econ 405), Public Finance (Econ 434), Economics of Regulation (Econ 440), Law and Economics (Econ 442) Public Choice (Econ 443) or Housing and Mortgage Markets (Econ 446)

Financial Economics. Four courses to include:

  • Stocks, Bonds, and Financial Markets (Econ 215)

  • TWO of the following: Topics in Macroeconomics (Econ 410), Money and Banking (Econ 411), Economic Forecasting (Econ 422), International Finance (Econ 432), or Housing and Mortgage Markets (Econ 446)

  • Four-hour economics course at or above the 300-level

Behavioral Economics. Four Courses to include:

  • TWO of the following: Economics of Life (Econ 305), Experimental Economics (Econ 310), Economics and Psychology (Econ 315), or Health Economics (Econ 371)

  • Neuroeconomics (Econ 481)

  • Game Theory and Economic Activity (Econ 487)

Health Economics. Four courses to include:

  • Health Economics (Econ 371)

  • Health Policy and Economics (Econ 372)

  • TWO of the following:  Econometrics (Econ 420), Economics of Labor Markets (Econ 430), Public Finance (Econ 434), or Neuroeconomics (Econ 481)

Economic Development. Four courses to include:

  • Economic Development (Econ 362)

  • International Finance (Econ 432)

  • ONE of the following:  Political Economy of the American South (Econ 355), Development of the modern US Economy (Econ 356), Latin American Economics (Econ 364), or Development Issues for Africa (Econ 366)

  • Four-hour economics course at or above the 400-level

Economic History. Four courses to include:

  • TWO of the following:  Non-European Economic History (Econ 351), European Economic History (Econ 352), Political Economy of the American South (Econ 355), or Development of the Modern US Economy (Econ 356)

  • TWO of the following:  Industrial Organization (Econ 405), Economics of Labor Markets (Econ 430), International Trade (Econ 431), Public Finance (Econ 434), Economics of Regulation (Econ 440), or Law and Economics (Econ 442)

Note that an Empirical Course (Econ 420 or 422) cannot be double-counted to serve as both an elective and an empirical requirement.

Additional Information

  • At most two Economics courses can be exempt with AP credit.

  • Courses must be taken for a letter grade, except for Economics 394, and students must maintain an overall 2.0 (C) grade point average in courses used to complete a major.

  • Students in Economics 394, Washington Economic Policy Semester, must register S/U instead of L/G.  The credits earned for this course will be counted as 200/300 level elective(s).

  • Economics 449, Economics Internship, is offered to economics majors and minors only and must be taken on an S/U basis.

  • Economics 101 and 112 are prerequisites for higher numbered courses in Economics and for admission to the undergraduate program in the Business School. Economics 101 must be completed before enrolling in Economics 112.  Business 201 can substitute for Economics 101.

  • Generally, Economics 20l, 2l2, and 220 are taken at Emory.  Only under extraordinary circumstances may these courses be taken at other institutions; prior written approval of the director of undergraduate studies is required.

  • Courses taken at another institution, before or after enrolling at Emory, will not count toward the major unless written permission is given by the director of undergraduate studies, even if the College has accepted credit for the courses.

  • At most four semester hours of Economics 397R, Directed Reading in Economics, may be counted toward the major requirements in Economics.

  • Up to eight semester hours of credit earned at non-Emory overseas study programs may be counted toward the major requirements in Economics, mostly as 300 level elective(s).  Prior written approval of the Economics Department’s Study Abroad Coordinator is required.

  • Economics majors anticipating graduate work in Economics at a minimum should complete Mathematics 112 and Mathematics 211.  They also should give serious consideration to taking mathematics courses in real analysis and differential equations.

  • We strongly recommend that students who plan to write an honors thesis complete Economics 201, 212, 220, and one empirical course (Requirement C) by the end of their junior year.

  • If Economics 420 or 422 is taken to fulfill the empirical requirement (Requirement C) then it cannot double count as an elective (Requirement D).  Alternately, if  Economics 420 or 422 is taken as an elective (Requirement D) it cannot double count as an empirical course (Requirement C).

Students who seek a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Studies must complete eleven courses in four areas: Foundation Courses, Intermediate Breadth Courses, Upper Level Electives, and Independent Study. One Field Course and one Upper Level Lab course are required as part of, but not in addition to, this coursework. An additional 5 courses in chemistry, math and physics and/or biology are also required. Except for courses listed under the BS course options, no 100-level courses may be applied toward the major. Foundation Courses (three required): the foundation consists of three courses (ENVS 131, 260 and 390) designed for students seeking a major.  Intermediate Breadth Courses (three required): at least one 200-level course in each of three discipline areas: Ecology/Conservation, Earth Science, and Social Science and Policy. Upper Level Electives (four required): students will choose four courses (200 level and above) to form a focus in a particular area. Students are given a great deal of flexibility and responsibility in choosing their elective courses. The Upper Level Elective area course options include courses offered in the department and those cross-listed with other departments. Elective courses are intended to provide students with the opportunity to focus their studies in a given area. Focus area choices are guided by a student’s interests and in consultation with the faculty advisor. A limited number of study abroad courses, Emory courses outside the department, or transfer courses may be counted for the major, subject to ENVS department approval.
Foundation Courses (three courses required) Student must complete ENVS 131: Introduction to Environmental Studies (with lab) ; ENVS 260: Quantitative Methods in Environmental Studies, and ENVS 390:  Environmental Studies Seminar. Intermediate Breadth Courses (three courses required; one course from each category A-C) A. Earth Science ENVS 222: Evolution of the Earth (with lab)  ENVS 230: Fundamentals of Geology (with lab) ENVS 235: Environmental Geology ENVS 241: Modern and Ancient Tropical Environments (1 credit) and ENVS 242: Modern and Ancient Tropical Environments Field Course (3 credits) [Note: That both ENVS 241 and ENVS 242 are required to fulfill the Earth Science Category. ENVS 241/ENVS 242 also fulfills the field course component of the major] B. Social Science and Policy ENVS 215: Human Ecology ENVS 225: Institutions and the Environment ENVS 227: Environmental Policy C. Ecology and Conservation ENVS 232: Integrated Methods in Ecology (with lab) ENVS 240: Ecosystem Ecology (with lab) ENVS 247: Ecology (with lab) Upper –Level Electives (four courses required, courses must be at the 200-level or above) The following are examples of ENVS courses that satisfy the upper-level electives: ENVS 250, ENVS 320, ENVS 321, ENVS 324, ENVS 325, ENVS 329, ENVS 330, ENVS 331, ENVS 339, ENVS 340, ENVS 342, ENVS 3442, ENVS 344, ENVS 345, ENVS 346, ENVS 348, ENVS 349, ENVS 350, ENVS 359, ENVS 361, ENVS 371, ENVS 372, ENVS 377, ENVS 383, ENVS 384, ENVS 385, ENVS 399, ENVS 410, ENVS 420, ENVS 442, ENVS 444, ENVS 446, ENVS 458, ENVS 483. Independent Study (one four hour course required) The following courses satisfy the independent study requirement: ENVS 491, ENVS 495R, ENVS 497R, ENVS 498R, ENVS 499R Field Study Courses (one 4 hour course) Students must complete four hours in an approved field study course. A field course may also be used to satisfy one other ENVS requirement (Intermediate area or an upper-level elective requirement). ENVS 241 and ENVS 242 ENVS 371 and 372 ENVS 442 ENVS 444 ENVS 446 Upper level lab requirement (one 4 hour ENVS 200-level or above course “with lab”) Students must complete an upper-level lab course within ENVS course offerings. The course may also be used to satisfy one other ENVS requirement (Intermediate area or an upper-level elective requirement). Additional B.S. Requirements: Five additional courses in chemistry, math and physics and/or biology are also required. At least one course from each of the three categories, then two courses from any category. Math and Computer Science: MATH 107 MATH 111 MATH 112 MATH 115 MATH 116 CS 170 Natural Science: Biology/Physics: BIO 141 BIO 142 PHYS 141 PHYS 142 PHYS 151 PHYS 152 Natural Science: Chemistry CHEM 141 CHEM 142 CHEM 221z/CHEM 226L CHEM 222z/CHEM 227L